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23 (Sat)
Event Details
Start Date/Time 21st Jun Thursday AM 9:00 (GMT -5)
End Date/Time 24th Jun Sunday PM 5:00 (GMT -5)
Location Ottawa, ON
Contact info@ottawasummersolstice.ca
Categories
Author pmnationtalk
Type Public
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Summer Solstice Indigenous Festival

Anishinabe aking ate awaso kikinawadjichigan. (This land we are upon is the traditional territory of the Algonquin people.) Ottawa was called many things before Queen Victoria named it Canada’s capital. It was called Bytown, Unitytown, Outaouais and other names too. “Ottawa” is an Anishinabe word that means “to trade.” Odawa is actually how we spell it. This is a First Nation as well. Algonquin people refer to themselves as “Anishinabe” in their original language. It is commonly believed by the original people of this region that French explorer Samuel de Champlain overheard an East Coast First Nation, the Maliseet people, refer to us as, “They who are our allies” and/or “They who are dancing.” He wrote this in his diary as the name for the people of this area. The word “Algonquin” came to be a more widely known term for the language grouping of First Nations representing the Anishinabe, Odawa, Ojibwe, Omamawinini, Kitchesipirini, Micmac, Maliseet, Cree, Saulteaux, Potawatami, and others. Long before first contact with Europeans, Indigenous people had a name for this landbase: “Kitche Zibi,” or Great River. Today this river is called the Ottawa River. There were four directions that people came here to gather for ceremony and trade. East and west and south by way of the present day Gatineau river, and north by way of the Rideau river which flows north. There are sacred ceremonial sites throughout this region. This area came to have what were called “Peace and Friendship Treaties.” These were not land surrenders. The use of the wampum belt was a form of agreement whereby the newcomers and original people, the Iroquois and the Anishinabe, would continue living by hunting and gathering in their traditional territories like they had for millenia. This is why today we refer to the City of Ottawa as Unceded land. It was never surrendered to any Crown from overseas.

Event Details
Start Date/Time 23rd Jun Saturday AM 9:00 (GMT -4)
End Date/Time 24th Jun Sunday PM 5:00 (GMT -4)
Location Sarnia, ON
Contact twilliams@aamjiwnaang.ca
Categories
Author pmnationtalk
Type Public
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Aamjiwnaang First Nation 57th Annual Pow-Wow

June 23 - June 24 Location: 1972 Virgil Ave., Sarnia, Ontario (Bear Park behind the Community Centre) Gates Open: 10 am both days Registration closes Saturday 11:45am Grand Entry: SAT 12 pm and 6pm, SUN 12pm Admission Fee:  $8.00 per day ages 6 to 54, Seniors 55+, Kids 5 and under are FREE ALL DANCERS MUST REGISTER IN PERSON for all dance categories including Tiny Tots, Baby Contest & Specials. Dance and Drum Contests over $52,000 in Prizes (All prizes are paid in cash) Special Declarations: Committee is not responsible for theft, accidents, lodging, inclement weather or lack of travelling funds. ABSOLUTELY NO DRUGS, ALCOHOL OR PETS ALLOWED ON THE PREMISES.  Rough camping and showers available. Contact: Tracy Williams at twilliams@aamjiwnaang.ca or Tanya Williams at tanya.williams@aamjiwnaang.ca or 519-336-8410

Event Details
Start Date/Time 23rd Jun Saturday AM 9:00 (GMT -5)
End Date/Time 23rd Jun Saturday PM 5:00 (GMT -5)
Location ON
Contact admin@nameres.org
Categories
Author pmnationtalk
Type Public
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Na-Me-Res Annual Traditional Pow Wow

Annual Traditional Pow Wow

Na-Me-Res is the proud host of Toronto’s Annual Traditional Pow Wow in recognition of National Aboriginal Day and the Summer Solstice.  Every year, thousands of people attend the celebration to enjoy traditional food and watch over 100 drummers and dancers perform. Come explore the information booths, meet First Nations crafters and vendors, and participate in activities and giveaways. Admission to the Pow Wow is free, open to the general public, and a great event for families.

2018 Pow Wow Poster

After the Grand Entry, the rest of the day is a wealth of traditional dancing and drumming, a shared feast, and the gathering of communities across Turtle Island. Traditional food includes vegetarian and meat tacos, and corn soup with bannock. Non-traditional fare includes hamburgers and hot dogs. Any donations on the day directly support Na-Me-Res programming. To learn how you can participate in next year’s Pow Wow, please contact powwow@nameres.org or call (416) 651-6750 x 2233 For media inquiries, please write to admin@nameres.org.

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