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Ka:’yu:’k’t’h’/Chek’tles7et’h’ First Nation Treaty Vote Result

October 21, 2007

KYUQUOT—Our people have spoken, we are pleased and excited to become Self Governing, Self Sufficient and to regain our identity.

Over the past few years we have negotiated a treaty on behalf our Ha’wiih for the future of our children and grandchildren to come.

This Treaty gives us the opportunity and tools to become Self Determining and Independent Nations. It gives the responsibility of Governing our Nations back to our Ha’wiih and places them in Government.

by NationTalk on October 24, 20071077 Views

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Human Rights Conference in Saskatoon, Nov.1-2, 2007

The Ariel F. Sallows Human Rights Activism Conference, Chains & Links is being held at the Parktown Hotel and is sponsored by the College of Law, University of Saskatchewan. Everyone must pre-register online and a $15 cash registration fee is payable at the door.

CHAINS & LINKS
HUMAN RIGHTS ACTIVISM CONFERENCE
NOVEMBER 1st and 2nd 2007
Saskatoon, Saskatchewan

Visit website for more information or to register.

by NationTalk on October 24, 2007961 Views

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ITK President Mary Simon Launches Cross Canada Speaking Tour “Inuit and the Canadian Arctic: Sovereignty Begins at Home”

Tuesday October 23, 2007 – Ottawa, Ontario – Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami President Mary Simon today launches a Cross Canada Speaking tour titled, “Inuit and the Canadian Arctic: Sovereignty Begins at Home.” The national launch is being held at the Canadian Club of Ottawa luncheon at the historic Chateau Laurier in Ottawa.

“Our concept of asserting Canadian sovereignty in the Arctic goes well beyond the much needed military and legal measures anticipated and recently announced by the Government of Canada,” says Mary Simon. “My purpose in speaking to Canadians in all provinces and territories is to make the case that the best way to assert Canadian sovereignty in the Arctic is through its residents who live in the region. The Inuit approach to asserting sovereignty is holistic in nature and calls for the development of healthy people and healthy communities alongside the military and legal measures.”

by NationTalk on October 24, 20071172 Views

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Support our languages, Kitikmeot Inuit demand -CBC

Support our languages, Kitikmeot Inuit demand

Last Updated: Tuesday, October 23, 2007 | 9:48 AM CT
CBC News

Inuit in the Kitikmeot region in western Nunavut say they want the territory’s proposed education act to recognize their languages.

Meeting in Cambridge Bay last week, members of the Kitikmeot Inuit Association passed a resolution calling for the act to include the dialects of Inuinnaqtun and Nattilikmiun as languages to be taught in all Nunavut schools.

http://www.cbc.ca/canada/north/story/2007/10/23/kia-lang.html

by NationTalk on October 24, 2007706 Views

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College Student Assembly Collecting Items for Families in Kashechewan -Timmins Daily Press

College student assembly collecting items for families in Kashechewan

Posted By Chelsey Romain
Posted 11 hours ago

Growing up in neighbouring Attawapiskat, Robin Kebokee is familiar with life in Kashechewan.

She has experienced the high cost of living and the hardships of the community, but now she said she is ready to give back.

Today, Kebokee is a student of Northern College’s Porcupine campus and holds the position of social and cultural affairs representative on the college’s Native Student Assembly.

http://www.timminspress.com/ArticleDisplay.aspx?e=745425&auth=Chelsey+Romain

by NationTalk on October 24, 2007788 Views

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Share Gambling Revenues with Aboriginal Communities: Hampton -CBC

Share gambling revenues with aboriginal communities: Hampton

Last Updated: Tuesday, October 23, 2007 | 8:47 AM ET
The Canadian Press

The province is discriminating against a northern aboriginal charitable casino by not allowing it to offer card tables, NDP Leader Howard Hampton said Monday as he called on the Ontario government to restart negotiations aimed at sharing gambling revenues with aboriginal communities.

Chief Ken Skead, from the Wauzhushk Onigum First Nation, and the community’s lawyer will be at the Ontario legislature Tuesday to pressure the province to allow for the casino’s expansion.

http://www.cbc.ca/canada/toronto/story/2007/10/23/hampton-casinos.html

by NationTalk on October 24, 2007742 Views

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Circle Of Care Campaign Exceeds Goal Thanks To Manitobans Who Opened Their Hearts And Homes: Child And Family Services Authorities

Manitoba News Release
……………………………………………………
October 23, 2007
– – –
Extended Campaign to Focus On Siblings, Special-needs Children: CFS Authorities

The hundreds of Manitobans who responded to an appeal to become foster parents and joined the Circle of Care were recognized and thanked today by Manitoba’s Child and Family Services Authorities and Family Services and Housing Minister Gord Mackintosh as they marked National Foster Family Week.

“Our heartfelt thanks goes out to those who came forward,” said Rose McKay, CEO of the First Nations of Northern Manitoba Child and Family Services Authority. “Last November, we had hoped to recruit 300 beds. Today, we have exceeded that target. We now have 500 new foster-care beds.”

by NationTalk on October 24, 20071384 Views

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BMO Financial Group Joins Canadian Aboriginal and Minority Supplier Council – CAMSC

TORONTO, Oct. 23 – BMO Financial Group announced today that it has joined the Canadian Aboriginal and Minority Supplier Council – CAMSC – an initiative that demonstrates BMO’s commitment to enhancing access for Aboriginal and visible minority suppliers and that strengthens its ability to foster brand loyalty with the most rapidly growing groups of consumers in Canada. Membership in CAMSC allows the bank to be responsive to this important market by providing both financial services and new business opportunities to help them grow their businesses.

“Aboriginal and minority-owned businesses represent an emerging source of competitive and innovative suppliers,” said Michael Thornburrow, Senior Vice President, Corporate Real Estate and Strategic Sourcing, BMO Financial Group. “Our membership in CAMSC will reinforce our role as a corporate leader in support of diversity initiatives and will help us build both supplier and customer relationships and new business opportunities in the Aboriginal and visible minority market.”

by NationTalk on October 23, 20072655 Views

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Canadian paediatricians Join International Efforts to Eradicate Poverty

OTTAWA, Oct. 22 – The Canadian Paediatric Society is part of a global effort spearheaded by the Council of Science Editors to raise awareness, understanding and further research on poverty throughout the world. Paediatrics & Child Health, the CPS journal, is one of 233 peer reviewed publications publishing papers on the topic this month.

The October issue of Paediatrics & Child Health examines poverty from a Canadian perspective. Exploring issues such as poverty during pregnancy, its relation to obesity and its impact on educational outcomes for children, the journal examines what paediatricians, family physicians and other child health professionals can do to break the cycle.

by NationTalk on October 23, 20071036 Views

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ITK President Encouraged by Support for Arctic Sovereignty Following Globe & Mail Online Discussion

Monday October 22, 2007 – Ottawa, Ontario – Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami President Mary Simon participated in a live online discussion today on the Globe and Mail web site relating to Arctic Sovereignty, a prominent theme in last week’s Throne Speech. During the hour long live discussion, over a dozen questions were answered from readers across Canada and the United States.

“I am encouraged by the interest from Canadians on this topic, and further on the level of support for the Inuit in the Arctic on this issue,” said Mary Simon following the online session. “Tomorrow I will launch a cross Canada speaking tour on the issue of Arctic Sovereignty and I will mention this in my opening event at the Chateau Laurier in Ottawa. I am eager to meet Canadians from coast to coast to coast and engage in positive and progressive discussions about sovereignty, and a host of issues facing Inuit in the Arctic today.”

by NationTalk on October 23, 20071004 Views

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The North “like Darfur” -CMAJ

Poverty and human development
The North “like Darfur”

Ann Silversides
Toronto

Most of the time, Nick Finney’s job is to respond to rapid-onset humanitarian disasters — floods, earthquakes and health emergencies. But in First Nations communities in northern Canada last winter he witnessed “the slowest evolved disaster that I’ve ever worked in.”

Finney, based in Britain, is Save the Children’s acting head of emergency capacity. He was invited by the remote communities to visit and conduct international aid–style assessments. “At first, it seemed like my work in Kenya after the flood — creating a multidisciplinary team of locals and others, taking a plane to remote communities,” he said in a telephone interview from London. “But this disaster goes back to the last century. The level of deprivation is truly shocking. We visited a damp, 1-bedroom house with a family of 25 living in it.”

http://www.cmaj.ca/cgi/content/full/177/9/1013?ct

by NationTalk on October 23, 2007896 Views

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Maa-nulth pact faces clear sailing at legislature -Times Colonist

Maa-nulth pact faces clear sailing at legislature
Liberals and NDP both support treaty worth up to $500 million, but federal election could delay Tsawwassen and west Island deals

Jeff Rud, Times Colonist
Published: Tuesday, October 23, 2007

Provincial politicians are preparing to debate a second treaty agreement during the current sitting of the legislature, now that the Maa-nulth First Nations have voted strongly in favour of their deal.

Aboriginal Affairs and Reconciliation Minister Mike de Jong said yesterday his government plans to introduce ratification legislation similar to that introduced for the Tsawwassen treaty last week.

http://www.canada.com/victoriatimescolonist/news/story.html?id=b88eb6af-7107-426e-b225-5961bcae39cb

by NationTalk on October 23, 2007822 Views

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Much work ahead in treaty process: Minister -Globe and Mail

Much work ahead in treaty process: Minister

ROD MICKLEBURGH
October 23, 2007

VANCOUVER — Aboriginal Relations Minister Mike de Jong said yesterday that the provincial government is under no illusion the latest native treaty is a breakthrough for the laborious process that has spent a billion dollars over 14 years with only two agreements to show for it.

“Do we interpret [the weekend’s treaty acceptance by the Maa-nulth First Nations] as meaning all the stars have aligned and a quick successful end to the treaty process is now in sight? No,” said Mr. de Jong.

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/story/LAC.20071023.BCTREATY23/TPStory/National

by NationTalk on October 23, 2007845 Views

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First Nations Want a Stop to Building Permits for Subdivision; Developer Agrees… -The Sun Times

First Nations want a stop to building permits for subdivision; Developer agrees to indemnify municipality for legal actions by bands

Posted By By PHIL McNICHOL
Posted 10 hours ago

Northern Bruce Peninsula council has taken steps to protect itself and its ratepayers from the cost of any legal actions after refusing a Saugeen Ojibwa request that it stop issuing building permits for a subdivision on the Lake Huron shoreline.

The municipality and the developer of the Greenough Harbour subdivision, in the Stokes Bay area, have signed an indemnification agreement obligating the developer to cover the cost of any “claims or proceedings” taken by the Saugeen Ojibwa as a result of the municipality’s continued issuance of building permits “for any of the lots” up to a cost of $25,000.

http://www.owensoundsuntimes.com/ArticleDisplay.aspx?e=745088&auth=By+PHIL+McNICHOL

by NationTalk on October 23, 2007855 Views

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Aboriginals not Central in Throne Speech -The Leader-Post

Aboriginals not central in throne speech

Doug Cuthand, The Leader-Post
Published: Monday, October 22, 2007

The speech from the throne is hyped by the media as the last word from the government of the day when in reality it is only the first. Normally throne speeches are treated as statements in which the government puts forward its agenda for the coming session of Parliament and not something that holds the confidence of the government in power.

Throne speeches are followed by the details and legislation and it is at this point where the confidence of the government is on the line. Prime Minister Stephen Harper has made the throne speech an issue of confidence that could take the country to an election nobody, except for a few political junkies, wants.

http://www.canada.com/reginaleaderpost/news/city_province/story.html?id=6d30db5a-b787-409a-9741-5c76279df954

by NationTalk on October 23, 2007894 Views

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Aboriginal Literature Awards Handed out -The StarPhoenix

Aboriginal literature awards handed out

The StarPhoenix
Published: Monday, October 22, 2007

The Ânskohk Aboriginal Literature Festival announced winners in four categories and gave out the Lifetime Achievement Award on Friday night in Saskatoon. The festival is sponsored by the Saskatchewan Native Theatre Company.

The Lifetime Achievement Award was presented to Basil Johnston, a respected author, storyteller and preserver of the Anishinaubae language. Johnston has written more than 20 books, a novel and numerous articles for newspapers, anthologies and periodicals. He worked at the Royal Ontario Museum from 1970 to 1994 in the department of ethnology, is a history teacher and has lectured at various universities and colleges across Canada. He has also been inducted into the Order of Canada, won the 2004 National Aboriginal Achievement Award and has honorary doctorates from the University of Toronto and Laurentian University.

http://www.canada.com/saskatoonstarphoenix/news/lifestyle/story.html?id=c85a83b3-9b5d-43c9-a886-9a8acb8640a2

by NationTalk on October 23, 2007810 Views

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Cultures and Caribou Explored Together -StarPhoenix

Cultures and caribou explored together

Wendy Gillis, The StarPhoenix
Published: Monday, October 22, 2007

In her study of Saskatchewan’s woodland caribou, University of Saskatchewan biology master’s student Naomi Carriere is not only working toward the preservation of a species at risk, she’s challenging the way it has traditionally been done.

Originally from the Cumberland House Métis community, Carriere combines her scientific education with her aboriginal heritage to create a unique approach to the study of woodland caribou, a species currently threatened in Saskatchewan.

http://www.canada.com/saskatoonstarphoenix/news/story.html?id=2433ba7f-b218-4151-9c4a-0385e8e70710

by NationTalk on October 23, 2007757 Views

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Private Member’s Bill Designed to Protect First Nations Cultural Sites -Times Colonist

Private member’s bill designed to protect First Nations cultural sites

Rob Shaw, Victoria Times Colonist
Published: Monday, October 22, 2007

The provincial opposition will try to reform B.C.’s much-criticized Heritage Conservation Act today by introducing a private member’s bill designed to push the government into helping cover the cost of protecting First Nations cultural sites threatened by development.

The bill proposes modernizing government laws that First Nations groups have called ineffective in preserving their spiritual places and grave sites, said NDP MLA Maurine Karagianis (Esquimalt-Metchosin). Thousands of such sites dot the B.C. coastline.

http://www.canada.com/victoriatimescolonist/news/story.html?id=d08602e5-fd60-46de-9852-b162d3c901c5&k=5920

by NationTalk on October 23, 2007773 Views

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Opposition planning heritage act changes to ease natives’ fears -The Province

Opposition planning heritage act changes to ease natives’ fears

The Province
Published: Monday, October 22, 2007

The opposition will try to reform B.C.’s much-criticized Heritage Conservation Act today by introducing a private member’s bill designed to push the government into helping cover the cost of protecting First Nations cultural sites threatened by development.

The bill proposes modernizing laws that First Nations groups have called ineffective in preserving their spiritual places and gravesites, said NDP MLA Maurine Karagianis (Esquimalt-Metchosin).

http://www.canada.com/theprovince/news/story.html?id=1a810f16-0346-436c-b2aa-ecc4479d59e4

by NationTalk on October 23, 2007717 Views

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The East Has Seen Positive Projects, Too -Daily News

The east has seen positive projects, too

CANDY PALMATER

This is the fourth story in a five-part series by Candy Palmater. It explores the Mi’kmaq nation specifically and matters affecting aboriginal people in general and will appear in The Daily News every Monday of Mi’kmaq History Month this October. This week: aboriginal rights

When I watch the national and local news, I often see stories about aboriginal people, but rarely do those stories take place here on the East Coast. If we were to believe what we see in the media, we would think the only positive activity is happening on the West Coast.

http://www.hfxnews.ca/index.cfm?sid=73320&sc=89

by NationTalk on October 23, 2007667 Views

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Ontario First Nations Policy Forum

October 23, 2007

Dear Leadership,

It is with great pleasure that I invite all Chiefs, Councillors, Education, Justice and Social Services employees to attend and provide their input at the Policy Forum.

The Chiefs of Ontario office is planning a Policy Forum to be held December 4-6, 2007 in Toronto at the Marriott Hotel Yorkville located at 90 Bloor Street East, Toronto, Ontario.

The purpose of the Policy Forum is to provide the opportunity for First Nations leadership, technicians and policy staff to engage in a dialogue and provide feedback on important policy issues toward the development of policy positions. The Policy Forum will not be a decision-making forum and no resolutions will be passed. It is an opportunity to share information and obtain feedback from First Nations on the Final Report of the Ipperwash Inquiry, Education, and Social Services.

by NationTalk on October 23, 20071018 Views

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Continued Support For Highway Of Tears Initiative Urgently Needed

Attention: Assignment Editor, News Editor, Government/Political Affairs Editor

PRINCE GEORGE, BC, PRESS RELEASE–(Oct. 23, 2007) – On October 12, the RCMP stated that their investigation of missing and murdered women in the Highway of Tears investigation had expanded from nine to 18 women. Their review expanded the geographic scope of the Highway of Tears from the 800 kilometers between Prince George and Prince Rupert to now include the Kamloops to Prince George corridor.

by NationTalk on October 23, 20071085 Views

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INAC’s First Nation Housing Program

Revised: 2007-10-22

In the 1960s, INAC introduced a housing program to assist in the construction and renovation of housing on reserves. The program provided subsidies for new residential construction and the renovation and rehabilitation of existing houses.

With the introduction of a 1996 On-Reserve Housing Policy, certain restrictions on the use of the subsidies were removed providing First Nations with greater flexibility and control over housing policies and programs in their communities.

by NationTalk on October 23, 20071687 Views

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Climate Change Leaders Promote North America’s Green Future

October 23, 2007

WINNIPEG, Man.—Manitoba Premier Gary Doer, Arizona Gov. Janet Napolitano and British Columbia Premier Gordon Campbell today reaffirmed their commitment to work together to deal with climate change and embrace the new economic opportunities associated with increasing renewable energy and energy efficiency.

The three leaders, who are all members of the international Western Climate Initiative and the Climate Registry, spoke about the importance of positive leadership by regional governments in Canada and the United States at an event hosted jointly by the Winnipeg Chamber of Commerce and the Government of Manitoba.

by NationTalk on October 23, 20071051 Views

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S-VOX/VisionTV: Canadian Independent Specialty Channels Urge CRTC to Preserve Diversity of Television System

TORONTO, ONTARIO–(Oct. 23, 2007) – Joint submission recommends putting independents in digital “basic” package to offset impact of concentration, integration.

The diversity of the Canadian television system depends on preserving a place for small, independent specialty services, according to a submission to the federal broadcast regulator filed jointly by a group of these channels.

The broadcasters have called upon the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) to require that cable companies and other broadcast distribution undertakings (BDUs) continue to provide a mandatory “basic” package in the digital television universe – one in which independent Canadian channels have “must-carry” status.

by NationTalk on October 23, 20071082 Views

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Campbell, Doer Sign Agreement On Climate Action

NEWS RELEASE
For Immediate Release
2007OTP0163-001351
Oct. 23, 2007

Office of the Premier
Province of Manitoba

WINNIPEG – Manitoba and British Columbia will join forces to deal with climate change, improve conditions for Aboriginal citizens, and further international relations and trade under an agreement signed today by Premier Gordon Campbell and Manitoba Premier Gary Doer.

“Manitoba and B.C. recognize the need for partnership and collective action on climate change, labour mobility, international trade and relations and closing the social and economic gaps for First Nations,” Campbell said. “Through this agreement, we will share information, new technologies and speak with a collective voice on issues of national and continental importance.”

by NationTalk on October 23, 20071113 Views

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Global Warming, Increasing Exploitation Of Natural Resources, Dispossessing Indigenous Peoples Of Ancestral Lands

Sixty-second General Assembly
Third Committee
19th Meeting (AM)

Small Number of Isolated Communities at Risk of Physically Disappearing

Despite recent progress, as seen in new norms and institutions as well as policies at all levels addressing the rights of the world’s indigenous peoples, there was still an “implementation gap” between those norms and practice, and a number of negative trends vis-à-vis that marginalized population, the Third Committee (Social, Humanitarian and Cultural) heard today as it held its discussion on the rights of indigenous peoples.

“Extractive activities, large commercial plantations and non-sustainable consumption patterns have led to widespread pollution and environmental degradation,” Rodolfo Stavenhagen, the Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights and fundamental freedoms of indigenous peoples, told the Committee today as he presented the findings of his recent studies. The end result, he said, was that indigenous peoples, whose lives were closely linked to their lands, were dramatically affected by such trends, which had in turn led to their forced displacements.

In addition, Mr. Stavenhagen continued, various Arctic peoples were now suffering the direct consequences of global warming. And further compounding all of the negatives already cited was the criminalization of the social organizations of indigenous peoples which defended their rights. That by itself had generated new human rights violations, he observed.

The Special Rapporteur underscored that the decrease of territory belonging to indigenous peoples had been intensified by the dynamics of the globalized economy and its attendant increase in water and energy exploitation. A small number of isolated communities were actually at risk of physical disappearance because of those trends, he warned.

Many delegates mentioned the landmark status of the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples in enumerating the rights of that marginalized population, and reiterated their hopes that countries would work faithfully towards its implementation. Through the Declaration, many said that the international community had begun repayment of a historic debt to indigenous peoples.

The representative of Finland (on behalf of the Nordic countries), said that there should be more elaboration of how a human rights-based approach to development could serve the needs of indigenous peoples, including achieving the Millennium Development Goals. Focus also had to be maintained on the rights of indigenous women, who suffered from discrimination both as women and as indigenous people, he noted. Ecuador’s representative, on the other hand, welcomed the broad debate in the General Assembly on the devastating effects of global warming on indigenous peoples.

The representative of the Philippines said his delegation had helped push for the early adoption of the Declaration, and had played a key role in guiding positions to a middle ground while ensuring the approval of this landmark document that addressed the needs and rights of “our indigenous brethren”. If nations worked together to preserve and protect marginalized and indigenous peoples, the international community would be able to preserve and protect cultural diversity — a special hallmark of the human race, he said.

The representative of the United States said his country had voted against the Declaration because many of its core provisions had been unclear. He added that, in renewing the mandate of the Special Rapporteur in September, the Human Rights Council had made clear that he was only supposed to promote the Declaration “where appropriate”. That meant that the Special Rapporteur had no mandate to promote the Declaration in States that had voted against its adoption at the General Assembly.

by NationTalk on October 23, 20071015 Views

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Refocusing Indigenous Health

By Lindsay Waterman
Science and Technology Writer

An article in the October issue of the American Journal of Public Health found a strong correlation between social support and health in Canadian indigenous people. It may not seem remarkable, but the finding of this correlation has set an important precedent for research that focuses on the positive.

Since social problems in indigenous communities such as violence and alcohol abuse were first identified, research has dwelt on causes rather than solutions. Instead of studying why indigenous peoples’ health is often poor, this paper examines the factors that improve aboriginal health, focusing on the idea of “thriving” – how the communities flourish in response to adversity.

by NationTalk on October 23, 20071065 Views

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Premier Roland Announces Ministerial Portfolio Assignments

YELLOWKNIFE (22 October, 2007) – Indicating the government’s attention to maintain a full and active agenda, Premier Floyd Roland announced the portfolio assignments for the new Cabinet today.

Premier Roland said, “This government will begin working for the people immediately and vigorously. We have a lot to accomplish in the next four years and intend to get to work right away.”

by NationTalk on October 23, 20071073 Views

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NWT Premier Floyd Roland Responds to the Throne Speech

YELLOWKNIFE (18 October, 2007) – The Speech from the Throne delivered on Tuesday contained good news for Northerners said Premier Floyd Roland today.

“We are very encouraged by the federal government’s attention to the North. We clearly heard their intention to act on devolution and bring an agreement to a close, an issue which should be high on the agenda for the new territorial government.”

by NationTalk on October 23, 20071352 Views

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AHRC – Our National Office has a New Home

(AHRC — October 22, 2007)

Effective October 26, 2007 our national office will be located at:

Aboriginal Human Resource Council
708 – 2nd Avenue
Saskatoon, SK S7K 2E1

Please adjust your council mailing and courier contact information. Phone, fax, email and website contact information will remain the same.

>See full contact information

AHRC gratefully acknowledges a landmark donation of $25,000 from RBC Financial toward the purchase of our new office building. A plaque recognizing contributors will be profiled in the building entrance.

by NationTalk on October 23, 2007960 Views

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APTN Congratulates 2007 Gemini Award Winners

Monday, 22 October 2007

Aboriginal Peoples Television Network (APTN) is pleased to recognize and congratulate those programs associated with the network which recently received award recognition by the Academy of Canadian Cinema & Television during the announcement of the Gemini Lifestyle, Children’s and Youth winners on October 16th at the Liberty Grand Entertainment Complex in Toronto.

Wapos Bay was awarded the Gemini for Best Children’s or Youth Fiction Program or Series and Sara Snow won Best Writing in a Children’s or Youth Program or Series for renegadepress.com IV “Blackout” episode. This is the second and third consecutive year that Wapos Bay and renegadepress.com have won Gemini awards respectively.

by NationTalk on October 23, 20071634 Views

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Sierra Noble Spending This Years Christmas in Afghanistan

POSTED ON: 2007-10-22

Sierra Noble has been invited by General Hillier and his staff to travel to the Kandahar Military Base in Afghanistan to spend Christmas Day with our Canadian troupes as well as of course put on a show for them. This once in a lifetime trip will only add more compassion and support in Sierra’s heart toward the troupes after her travels to Belgium and France in 2005 with Veterans Affairs Canada, and her travels to Vimy Ridge for the 90th Anniversary of the Battle to perform “The Warriors Lament” in April She will be sure to give a detailed blog of her time in Afghanistan when she returns.

by NationTalk on October 22, 2007977 Views

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Residential School Survivors are Attractive Targets

The Residential School Survivors who are receiving payouts are at high risk of being abused, scammed and re-victimized by the slime of greed. A number of aboriginal communities, organizations and RCMP are trying to prepare for the wave of problems that rise with the large amounts of cash that are going to flood one of our most vulnerable groups, the elderly.

With the average Residential Schools Settlement payout at $28,000 this is no small task. When speaking with residential school survivors many are excited by the opportunities that this money will provide such as fixing poor housing conditions, buying a better vehicle, and traveling to spiritual gatherings. One couple has decided to attend treatment as they have struggled with addiction and desire a better quality of life; they have hope for a new beginning. But sadly, creating a financial plan or personal goals has become the least of the survivor’s worries.

by NationTalk on October 22, 20071599 Views

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Overview of First Nations Gaming – Results of Legislative Assembly September 19, 2007

Results from the Gaming Framework
Agreement – Review Period
Approved by FSIN Legislative Assembly
September 19, 2007

FSIN Gaming
Office of First Vice Chief
Morley Watson
Prepared by FSIN Gaming

Table of Contents
1. Background to the Review Period
2. Review Period Results
3. Negotiated Amendments

by NationTalk on October 22, 2007858 Views

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Sens Foundation Makes Largest One-Day Donation

Impact to the Community Nearing $50 Million

OTTAWA, ONTARIO–(Oct. 22, 2007) – With its donation of $840,000 to 32 local charitable organizations today at Scotiabank Place, the Sens Foundation and the Ottawa Senators Hockey Club drew nearer to achieving $50 million in contributions to community initiatives in the National Capital Region since the hockey club’s return to the National Hockey League in 1992.

Under the ownership of Eugene Melnyk since August 2003, the Ottawa Senators together with the Sens Foundation, alumni, partners and fans, have contributed more than $35 million to community initiatives. Among the organization’s many accomplishments are the creation of Roger’s House, a pediatric and palliative care facility located on the grounds at CHEO, which opened in April 2006, and the construction of Bell Sensplex, a multi-use facility that has welcomed minor hockey, figure skating, soccer and other sports and community events since December 2004.

by NationTalk on October 22, 20071173 Views

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British Columbia Lottery Corporation: Win the First Tickets to the Vancouver 2010 Olympic Winter Games

VANCOUVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA–(Oct. 22, 2007) – Today, British Columbia Lottery Corporation (BCLC) is pleased to release First Tickets to 2010, a new $5 SportsFunder Instant Win ticket offering players the chance to win the very first tickets to the Vancouver 2010 Olympic Winter Games Opening Ceremony.

“We are very proud to offer British Columbians the first chance to get tickets for this once-in-a-lifetime event,” said Dana Hayden, BCLC President & CEO. “The thrill and excitement of the Olympic Games is inspiring and moves people to participate in sports. Through SportsFunder lottery games, BCLC is offering the opportunity to support amateur athletes, many of whom aspire to compete at the Olympic level.”

by NationTalk on October 22, 20072184 Views

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Statement by the Honourable Chuck Strahl on the Ratification Vote on Maa-nulth First Nations Final Agreement

VANCOUVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA–(Oct. 21, 2007) – The following statement was released by the Honourable Chuck Strahl, Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development and Federal Interlocutor for Metis and Non-Status Indians:

“I would like to congratulate the members of the Maa-nulth First Nations, their leaders and Lead Negotiator Gary Yabsley, on the successful ratification of the Maa-nulth First Nations Final Agreement.

by NationTalk on October 22, 2007965 Views

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National, Provincial Environmental, Community, Business Leaders Move Climate Change Action Forward

October 22, 2007

National and provincial leaders will come together tomorrow in Winnipeg to provide concrete ideas on how to move Manitoba’s Climate Change Action Plan forward, Science, Technology, Energy and Mines Minister Jim Rondeau announced today.

“Climate change is becoming the world’s number one environmental challenge and Manitoba needs to be prepared for the impacts and identify economic opportunities,” said Rondeau. “We need to be a green economy leader and have already been recognized for work done in areas such as energy efficiency, renewable energy, green buildings, geothermal technology and sustainable land-use practices.”

by NationTalk on October 22, 20071011 Views

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‘Turn the heat down’ -Canada.com

‘Turn the heat down’
Even though she lost the Nobel Peace Prize to Al Gore, Inuit activist Sheila Watt-Cloutier’s own climate change battles are getting their day in the sun

Emanuel Lowi, The Ottawa Citizen
Published: Sunday, October 21, 2007

It’s a long way from a traditional Inuit upbringing on the banks of the Koksoak River in Quebec’s Nunavik region to the corridors of power at the U.S. Capitol and around the world. But it’s a distance traversed many times by Inuit leader and climate-change activist Sheila Watt-Cloutier.

http://www.canada.com/ottawacitizen/news/story.html?id=e9f90b3e-bd6c-4959-9435-9601e459cec7

by NationTalk on October 22, 2007883 Views

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Kusugak stepping down as Nunavut language commissioner -cbc

Kusugak stepping down as Nunavut language commissioner
Announcement made during hearings into proposed language laws

Last Updated: Monday, October 22, 2007 | 8:53 AM CT
CBC News

Nunavut’s language commissioner, Johnny Kusugak, says he will step down at the end of this year.

He made the announcement in Iqaluit on Friday during committee hearings into two proposed language bills aimed at protecting and strengthening the Inuit languages.

http://www.cbc.ca/canada/north/story/2007/10/22/kusugak-lang.html

by NationTalk on October 22, 2007937 Views

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Maa-Nulth First Nations Say Yes In Decisive Treaty Vote

NEWS RELEASE
For Immediate Release
2007OTP0161-001343
Oct. 21, 2007

Office of the Premier
Ministry of Aboriginal Relations and Reconciliation

VICTORIA – Community votes for all five Maa-nulth First Nations have concluded with close to eighty percent of those who voted saying yes to the treaty.

The Toquaht Nation, the Uchucklesaht Tribe, the Ucluelet First Nation, and the Ka:’yu:’k’t’h’/Che:k:tles7et’h’ First Nations all voted in favour of the Final Agreement in a series of separate ratification votes held October 13th through 20th. The four bands join the Huu-ay-aht First Nations, who ratified the agreement in July.

by NationTalk on October 22, 20071069 Views

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The Chiefs of Ontario is offering the following Training to Community Support Services Workers: Healing Using Traditional Medicine

October 22, 2007

This workshop will examine a variety of traditional medicine plants, their healing properties and current and traditional application. It will provide an increased awareness and understanding of traditional healing practices and science supporting the use of plant medicine. It will examine traditional gathering practices including the natural and spiritual laws governing when, where and how to gather medicine. It will demonstrate how incorporating plant medicine into our current lifestyle can increase our health. This workshop will bring together science and culture in a way that will benefit all who participate.

Upon completion of this workshop participants will be able to:

– Describe the functional use of medicinal plants
– Understand the natural laws governing traditional plant medicine gathering
– Understand the current and potential benefits of incorporating traditional medicine plants back into their lives
– Prepare medicine

by NationTalk on October 22, 2007990 Views

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CMHC Releases Comprehensive Report on Housing in Canada

OTTAWA, Oct. 22 – Building greener homes in higher-density neighbourhoods near public transit, rather than in sprawling suburbs, is key to reducing the housing sector’s impact on the environment and lowering greenhouse gas emissions, according to the 2007 Canadian Housing Observer released today by Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC).

“The focus on sustainable housing in this year’s Canadian Housing Observer is particularly timely given growing public interest in the environment,” said Karen Kinsley, President of CMHC. “The Observer is a reliable source of current and comprehensive analysis of housing trends and conditions in Canada.”

by NationTalk on October 22, 20071064 Views

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Montreal’s Jewish community honours Mohawk war hero who helped liberate Dachau (The Canadian Press)

Montreal’s Jewish community honours Mohawk war hero who helped liberate Dachau

Sun Oct 21, 6:13 PM
By Jonathan Montpetit, The Canadian Press

KAHNAWAKE, Que. – Wearing yarmulkes and rows of shinny medals, Jewish Second World War veterans and Holocaust survivors alike made a pilgrimage Sunday to the grave of a modest aboriginal war hero.

Michael Delisle Sr. was among the first to enter the Dachau concentration camp after its liberation, and on the first anniversary of his death Montreal’s Jewish community joined Mohawks to honour the exploits he never like to talk about.

http://ca.news.yahoo.com/s/capress/071021/national/holocaust_aboriginal_hero_2

by NationTalk on October 22, 2007910 Views

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Fire Causes Panic On First Nation – 980 CJME

Fire Causes Panic On First Nation
October 21, 2007

The Stoughton fire department had their hands full Sunday night with a grass fire on a reserve in southeastern saskatchewan…

RCMP telling us the source of the fire on the Ocean Man First Nation was likely a vehicle in the field.

http://www.newstalk980.com/index.php?p=ntnews&action=view_story&id=10331

by NationTalk on October 22, 2007971 Views

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Maa-Nulth Approve Treaty – Westcoaster

Maa-Nulth Approve Treaty

Five West Vancouver Island First Nations have voted in favour of a treaty settlement with the provincial and federal governments.

Sunday in Port Alberni, the Ucluelet, Toquaht, Uchucklesaht, and Kyuquot First Nations approved the Maa-nulth treaty, which will give five nations a capital transfer of $73.1 million, annual resource royalty payments averaging $1.2 million for 25 years and a land transfer totaling approximately 24,551 hectares.

http://www.westcoaster.ca/modules/AMS/article.php?storyid=2825

by NationTalk on October 22, 20071779 Views

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Government boats bypass Hollow Water blockade – Winnipeg Sun

Government boats bypass Hollow Water blockade

Conservation officers used boats to ferry approximately 25 cottagers to developments near Hollow Water First Nation yesterday so they could winterize their cabins.

Earl Simmons, chief natural resource officer with Manitoba Conservation, said six patrol vessels were used to transport people to four different cottage developments that can’t be reached by road because of blockades set up by the Hollow Water reserve last month.

http://winnipegsun.com/News/Manitoba/2007/10/21/4592807-sun.html

by NationTalk on October 22, 20071052 Views

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Time eroding pictograph heritage of Churchill River -CBC

Time eroding pictograph heritage of Churchill River

Last Updated: Saturday, October 20, 2007 | 3:45 PM ET
CBC News

Ancient aboriginal pictographs — some of them thousands of years old — are slowly disappearing in Canada’s North, the victims of time and erosion.

Cree canoeing the Churchill River created the rock paintings along their traditional water routes.

http://www.cbc.ca/arts/artdesign/story/2007/10/20/pictographs-fading.html?ref=rss

by NationTalk on October 22, 2007822 Views

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Grieving community seeks closure -CNews

Grieving community seeks closure

By THANE BURNETT
The Toronto Sun

SUMMER BEAVER, Ont. — Johnny Yellowhead walks deep into the north woods, to once again find one of Canada’s most isolated graveyards.

What he wants — what many in his nearby First Nation village of Summer Beaver (Nibinamik), Ont., still pray for these four years later — is a road to their dead.

http://cnews.canoe.ca/CNEWS/Canada/2007/10/21/4593884-sun.html

by NationTalk on October 22, 2007790 Views

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