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Manitoba’s BabyFirst Program

Monday, October 29, 2007 10:14 AM

Evaluating a program to reduce child maltreatment in Manitoba

With recent child deaths in Manitoba caused by maltreatment, the question being asked is how can we prevent this from happening again? A new study by the Manitoba Centre for Health Policy (MCHP) at the University of Manitoba evaluates the provincial BabyFirst program and its impact on child maltreatment.

The BabyFirst program was introduced by the Healthy Child Manitoba Office (HCMO) in 1999. The program is now known as Families First. The program is a home visiting program for families with newborns living under conditions of risk. One of the goals of the program is to prevent child maltreatment.

by NationTalk on October 31, 20071844 Views

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Meyers Norris Penny Launches Third Self-employment Training Program in Edmonton

Edmonton, AB – Oct. 25, 2007 – Meyers Norris Penny LLP (MNP), in partnership with Alberta Employment, Immigration and Industry, is pleased to announce the launch of the second fully sponsored Aboriginal Self-Employment Training Program in Edmonton, Alberta beginning Nov. 5, 2007.

Aboriginal people are starting new businesses at an amazing rate: Over the past 25 years, the number of self-employed Aboriginals has jumped from 7,000 to more than 20,000 – twice the national average growth rate. Getting solid training to help their businesses get off the ground can be a major challenge.

by NationTalk on October 30, 20071443 Views

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Meyers Norris Penny Launches Third Self-employment Training Program in Calgary

MEDIA RELEASE

Calgary, AB – Oct. 25, 2007 – Meyers Norris Penny LLP, in partnership with Alberta Employment, Immigration and Industry, is excited to announce the launch of the third fully sponsored Aboriginal Self-Employment Training Program in Calgary, Alberta starting Nov. 5, 2007.

Aboriginal people are starting new businesses at an amazing rate: Over the past 25 years, the number of self-employed Aboriginals has jumped from 7,000 to more than 20,000 – twice the national average growth rate. Getting solid training to help their businesses get off the ground can be a major challenge.

by NationTalk on October 30, 20071781 Views

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Vancouver Secondary Teachers’ Association: Midyear Cuts to Education Funding Target Vancouver Secondary Students

VANCOUVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA–(Oct. 29, 2007) – In an e-mail to all school districts secretary-treasurers, dated October 18, 2007, the Ministry of Education announced a cut to the 2007-08 operating grants for secondary students in Grades 10, 11, and 12. This cut to operating funds will target secondary students taking less than a full course load and will have a negative effect on many programs offered in Vancouver.

Students in alternate programs often do not take a full eight-course load: many have to work part-time, others may be returning to school in hopes of a better future. Students with tutorial blocks or those enrolled in Aboriginal support programs that are not credit courses will not be funded, yet they will still require teacher support to succeed.

by NationTalk on October 30, 20071261 Views

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UVic Student Wins National Aboriginal Writing Challenge

October 29, 2007

University of Victoria writing student Kerissa Dickie’s powerful tale of life of a young girl at a residential school put her in the winner’s seat (for the 19–29 age category) of The Aboriginal Writing Challenge—a short story contest for young Aboriginal Canadians. Dickie’s story, “Wild Flowers,” is about longing, loss, and connection as part of the residential school experience.

She wrote it as part of UVic writing professor Lorna Jackson’s writing workshop. “Her story is full of heart, and she has taken such care with the depiction of another time and place,” comments Jackson. “Only a compassionate, talented writer can write this way. I’m so pleased that Kerissa’s work will reach a larger audience.”

by NationTalk on October 30, 20071196 Views

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Opening of Anjabowa Daycare Facilities, Remarks by Deputy Grand Chief Ashley Iserhoff

Posted: 2007-10-26

Hello, it is my honour to be here on behalf of the Grand Council of the Crees to join you in the celebration of the Anjabowa Daycare facilities in Chisasibi. In 2003 an agreement was signed between the Cree Nation and Government to expand daycare services in the Cree communities. Since this time, the daycare facilities have increased the number of spaces being offered in the community for our children under the age of 5 years old. We had the pleasure of opening a daycare in Mistissini last year with Minister Carole Theberge. Unfortunately, in the last provincial election in the spring she was not re-elected to office; however, the good work she started with us many years ago with the opening of the first daycare in Eeyou Istchee to today with the opening of the new facilities in Chisasibi endures. We would like to acknowledge her for her leadership and commitment for her work.

by NationTalk on October 29, 20071071 Views

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Women in Film and Television-Toronto announces 2007 CBC Business of Broadcasting Mentorship Award and Call for Applications

(TORONTO – Wednesday, October 24, 2007) Women in Film and Television – Toronto (WIFT-T), in partnership with CBC Television, is pleased to announce the 2007 CBC Business of Broadcasting Mentorship Award and Call for Applications.

This national competitive award will give one emerging Canadian female filmmaker the invaluable opportunity to take a comprehensive week-long workshop at a designated CBC location. The winner will be given the opportunity to establish business and mentoring relationships with CBC Drama staff, and will be guided through various production and broadcast components of short film. Topics and areas of exploration will include: project management, financing film and television production, marketing and distribution, and emerging technologies and the impact of technology on content. The mentorship will begin in January 2008. The winner will be announced at the 2007 Crystal Awards Gala Luncheon held on December 4, 2006 at the Fairmont Royal York.

by NationTalk on October 27, 20071264 Views

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Supt. Shirley Cuillierrier Named Aboriginal Police Officer of the Year

OTTAWA – October 26, 2007 – Supt Shirley Cuillierrier of National Aboriginal Policing Services has been named “Indian Country Law Enforcement Officer of the Year” for 2007 by the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP), marking the first time a Canadian or a member of the RCMP has won this award.

Supt. Cuillierrier, an Aboriginal employee with 25 years of distinguished service, is being recognized for her role as Project Leader in the preparation and implementation of the coordinated police response to the National Day of Action by Aboriginal groups on June 29, 2007.

by NationTalk on October 27, 20071572 Views

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Get Ready, Get Set, Get Going: Learning to Read in Northern Canada

Julia O’Sullivan, Ph.D.
Janet Goosney

With the International Expert Panel

Centre of Excellence for Children and
Adolescents with Special Needs
Lakehead University, Thunder Bay, Canada

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

Canada’s North is an immense region crossing six time zones, inhabited by a young, culturally and linguistically diverse population living in communities that differ immensely in size and economic base. For this paper we define the North as Yukon, Northwest Territories, Nunavut, Labrador, and large northern areas of British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario, and Quebec.

In Canada there are 1,980,605 young school-age children; 133,405 (or 6.7%) live in the North.

Like five- to nine-year-olds in the rest of Canada, young northern children spend much of their time focused on learning to read. Today in Canada we expect all children to read well, usually by the end of Grade 3 and children’s reading at that time is a strong predictor of high school graduation. Children who do not read adequately by Grade 3 are at high risk for school failure, dropping out, chronic un- or underemployment, and low-income and associated difficulties in adulthood.

by NationTalk on October 27, 20071451 Views

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Atlantic Aboriginal Economic Development Officers receive Professional Certification

25 October 2007
MONCTON, New Brunswick

The Council for the Advancement of Native Development Officers (CANDO) recognized 20 members of the Atlantic Aboriginal Economic Developers Network during a ceremony held in Kamloops, British Columbia earlier today.

The Aboriginal Economic Development Officers have successfully completed a three-year professional certification program developed according to criteria from CANDO. The prestigious CANDO designation provides certification as either Professional Aboriginal Economic Developer or Technician Aboriginal Economic Developer and indicates achievement of a performance standard recognized and acknowledged throughout Canada. The certification ceremony, held during CANDO’s 14th Annual National Conference and Annual General Meeting, acknowledged the accomplishments of 61 Aboriginal Economic Development Officers from across Canada.

by NationTalk on October 26, 20072855 Views

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