S Mainstream Aboriginal Related News

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Long-Time Band Worker Among Air Crash Victims – The Chronicle-Journal

Long-time band worker among air crash victims

Bryan Meadows
Thursday, January 12, 2012

A long-time North Spirit Lake band office employee was among the victims of a fiery plane crash Tuesday at the remote reserve.
Chief Rita Thompson said Wednesday that Martha Campbell, 38, was a tireless worker for the band over the past 20 years.

“She did a lot of things. We called her a floater because she worked in almost every department in the band office,” Thompson said.

Campbell was coming back to work on the reserve when the Keystone Air charter flight crashed onto the ice just short of the community’s airport at about 10 a.m.

Read more: http://www.chroniclejournal.com/content/news/local/2012/01/12/long-time-band-worker-among-air-crash-victims

by NationTalk on January 12, 2012487 Views

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Northern Gateway Hearings on Move to Terrace, B.C. – The Canadian Press

Northern Gateway hearings on move to Terrace, B.C.

By: The Canadian Press
Posted: 01/12/2012

KITAMAAT VILLAGE, B.C. – Kitimat area residents were almost unanimous in their rejection of the proposed Northern Gateway oil pipeline project during two days of public hearings, and now it’s time for other northwest B.C. communities to provide their views on the development.

The Northern Gateway project joint review panel assessing the environmental effects of the proposed project moves to Terrace today and Smithers on Monday.

Hundreds of people gathered at a community hall in the aboriginal community of Kitamaat Village to address the three-member panel, with all but one of the more than one dozen individuals and groups denouncing the project on environmental, social and cultural grounds.

Read more: http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/canada/breakingnews/northern-gateway-hearings-on-move-to-terrace-bc-137164063.html

by NationTalk on January 12, 2012424 Views

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Tsawwassen Mall Presented to Neighbours – News 1130

Tsawwassen Mall Presented to Neighbours

Mega mall on Tsa First Nation land shown to neighbours

Opponents worried project will end “village atmosphere” in South Delta

Andrew Hopkins Jan 12, 2012

TSAWWASSEN (NEWS1130) – About 100 neighbours to the major shopping developments being proposed on Tsawwassen First Nation (TFN) land got a closer look at the plans at an open house last night.

Opponents are worried the project will end a “village atmosphere” in South Delta.

Tom McCarthy with the First Nation envisions a 1.2-million square foot indoor shopping centre next to a 600 thousand square foot outdoor mall. “It’s really important that everyone around us knows what the plans are, knows what we’re thinking about, has the opportunity to ask any questions they have.”

Read more: http://www.news1130.com/news/local/article/318871–tsawwassen-mall-presented-to-neighbours

by NationTalk on January 12, 2012561 Views

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City Lacks ‘One-Stop Shop’ for Native Resources – Calgary Herald

City lacks ‘one-stop shop’ for native resources

By Jamie Komarnicki, Calgary Herald January 12, 2012

Driftpile band member Henri Giroux’s home reserve is in a remote area of northern Alberta, but she’s never been a stranger to cities. Giroux grew up in Grande Prairie and spent years living in Edmonton.

So when she and her son moved to Calgary nine years ago, Giroux brought a U-Haul, a good map and an urban survival plan for life in a city of a million.

With advice and support from her parents, the young woman had enough cash for several month’s rent, then used the Internet to find a place to live. The three-bedroom apartment in Lakeview she found was close to Mount Royal College, where Giroux had been accepted into an aboriginal education program.

Read more: http://www.calgaryherald.com/life/City+lacks+stop+shop+native+resources/5983277/story.html#ixzz1jGH18pqo

by NationTalk on January 12, 2012448 Views

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Ontario crash survivor crawled from burning plane – CBC

Ontario crash survivor crawled from burning plane

Injured passenger desperately tried to put out flames after escape
CBC News Posted: Jan 11, 2012

The wife of the lone survivor of Tuesday’s plane crash in northwestern Ontario that killed four people says it’s remarkable he got out alive from the burning wreckage.

Tracy Shead told CBC News her husband, Brian Shead, was sitting in the last row of the small plane en route to North Spirit Lake from Winnipeg.

The Piper PA-31 Navajo went down about 10 a.m. about a kilometre from the runway in the remote community.

“I guess the tail broke off and he was able to crawl out,” Tracy Shead said. “It’s amazing. I’m just so happy he’s alive.”

Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/toronto/story/2012/01/11/mb-plane-crash-north-spirit-winnipeg.html?cmp=rss

by NationTalk on January 11, 2012552 Views

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Aboriginal Affairs department is part of the problem – Montreal Gazette

Aboriginal Affairs department is part of the problem

BY PAUL FAUTEUX, THE GAZETTE JANUARY 11, 2012

The state of emergency declared by the chief of Attawapiskat has once again brought the plight of First Nations to the forefront of our collective consciousness. Prime Minister Stephen Harper has agreed to hold a Crown-First Nations gathering on Jan. 24, which Assembly of First Nations National Chief Shawn Ah-in-chut Atleo sees as an opportunity to reset the First Nations-Crown relationship. The experience of more successful First Nations in Canada suggests that a fundamental part of that reset should be to get rid of the recently renamed Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada (formerly known as the Department of Indian Affairs).

Some First Nations in Canada have been more successful than others in raising the level of well-being of their populations. But for the majority of these more successful First Nations, the Department of Indian Affairs has been, and its successor remains, one of the main impediments to their well-being.

Read more: http://www.montrealgazette.com/life/Aboriginal+Affairs+department+part+problem/5976930/story.html#ixzz1jAbTuFWJ

by NationTalk on January 11, 2012562 Views

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Despite gains, aboriginal student graduation rates remain low – Vancouver Courier

Despite gains, aboriginal student graduation rates remain low

Aboriginal graduation rates rose to 32.1 per cent in 2011 compared to 82.5 for non-aboriginal students

BY NAOIBH O’CONNOR, VANCOUVER COURIER JANUARY 11, 2012

Aboriginal student graduation rates remain significantly lower than non-aboriginal student graduation rates, but increased slightly from 2010 to 2011, according to the latest statistics released by the Vancouver School Board.

The six-year completion rate for the Dogwood diploma for aboriginal students rose from 25.4 per cent in 2010 to 32.1 per cent in 2011, while non-aboriginal student completion rates moved up from 80.7 per cent to 82.5 per cent during the same period.

Read more: http://www.vancourier.com/news/Despite+gains+aboriginal+student+graduation+rates+remain/5978590/story.html#ixzz1jAbA38rO

by NationTalk on January 11, 2012482 Views

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Blind Spot uncovered – Regina Leader-Post

Blind Spot uncovered

CBC report sheds light on important issues related to absent aboriginal fathers

BY JEFF DEDEKKER, LEADER-POST JANUARY 11, 2012

“How can you be a father if you haven’t had a father?”

This seemingly innocuous question becomes more intriguing upon reflection and CBC reporter/producer Geoff Leo is hoping a documentary shot in Regina will shine a spotlight on a subject that has been hidden in plain sight for decades.

Blind Spot: What Happened To Canada’s Aboriginal Fathers? not only puts the issue of absent aboriginal fathers under a microscope but also attempts to explain the causes of the crisis, the possible solutions and why the issue has never been addressed nationally.

Read more: http://www.leaderpost.com/life/Blind+Spot+uncovered/5976856/story.html#ixzz1jAasQ2L7

by NationTalk on January 11, 2012923 Views

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FAQs | Would Hobbema reserve’s gang evictions be legal? – CBC.ca

FAQs | Would Hobbema reserve’s gang evictions be legal?

By Kazi Stastna, CBC News
Last Updated: Jan 11, 2012

A recently adopted bylaw allowing residents to be evicted from an Alberta First Nation if enough people deem them a danger to the community has some asking just how much leeway reserves have in passing their own laws.

The new residency bylaw was passed by the Samson Cree First Nation, one of four nations located in the community of Hobbema, Alta., located 90 kilometres south of Edmonton. It must still get the nod from the federal minister of aboriginal affairs and northern development before it can take effect.

We take a look at some of the rules that govern law and order in aboriginal communities in Canada.

Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/story/2012/01/06/f-aboriginal-laws.html?cmp=rss

by NationTalk on January 11, 2012531 Views

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Canadian natives warn against pipeline to Pacific – Reuters

Canadian natives warn against pipeline to Pacific

By Jeffrey Jones
KITIMAAT VILLAGE, British Columbia | Tue Jan 10, 2012

(Reuters) – Aboriginal leaders opposed to a C$5.5 billion ($5.4 billion) oil sands pipeline backed by Canada’s government warned on Tuesday that the project could devastate fishing and traditional life on the rugged Pacific Coast and called for it to be stopped.

As hearings into Enbridge Inc’s proposed Northern Gateway pipeline opened with drumming and native singing, hereditary chiefs and elders of the Haisla First Nation told the regulatory panel their greatest fear was the potential impact of oil spills on their community of 1,500.

Read more: http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/01/10/us-enbridge-gateway-idUSTRE80926Y20120110

by NationTalk on January 11, 2012637 Views

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Banishment: Not a Simple Fix – The Leader-Post

Editorial: Banishment: not a simple fix

Banishing troublemakers is a complex legal issue

LEADER-POST JANUARY 11, 2012

Saskatchewan’s experience with the controversial practise of “banishment” – removing troublemakers from their communities – suggests a need for caution in its application.

The issue is in the news after residents of an Alberta reserve voted last week to give their band the power to evict or “banish” suspected gang members to address recent problems with “undesirable activity” and violence, including the death of a five year old in a drive-by shooting. (On Tuesday, the RCMP charged three youths with manslaughter related to that incident}.

Banishment has been used by First Nations to address lawlessness and anti-social behaviour for hundreds of years, but its use remained largely unknown in wider society until a high-profile Saskatchewan case in the 1990s. It involved a La Ronge man who was convicted by a Court of Queen’s Bench judge of sexual assault, assault and uttering death threats.

Read more: http://www.leaderpost.com/news/Editorial+Banishment+simple/5976850/story.html#ixzz1jAZ01PFv

by NationTalk on January 11, 2012594 Views

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Sask. First Nation Sues Canada, Province Over Potash, Oil Properties – Postmedia News

Sask. First Nation sues Canada, province over potash, oil properties

BY KERRY BENJOE, POSTMEDIA NEWS JANUARY 11, 2012

REGINA — The George Gordon First Nation is suing the federal and provincial governments for $10 billion it claims it is being “cheated out of” potash and oil developments.

In the suit served on the government on Tuesday, the First Nation alleges Canada and Saskatchewan improperly denied it access to billions of dollars worth of potash and oil and gas lands through misconduct by both levels of government throughout the George Gordon Treaty Land Entitlement Settlement Agreement process. The agreement was entered into by all three parties on Aug. 11, 2008.

“The general tenor of the lawsuit is that George Gordon First Nation, like many First Nations in Saskatchewan, are still owed land by Canada and Saskatchewan and before disposing of valuable oil and gas or potash lands to third parties . . . that there’s an obligation on the governments to find out from the First Nations whether they are interested in acquiring those lands first, which they did not do,” said Jeffrey R. W. Rath, an Alberta-based lawyer, who is representing the First Nation.

Read more: http://www.canada.com/news/Sask+First+Nation+sues+Canada+province+over+potash+properties/5976342/story.html

by NationTalk on January 11, 2012554 Views

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George Gordon First Nation Files $10 Billion Lawsuit – News Talk 650 CKOM

George Gordon First Nation files $10 billion lawsuit

Saskatchewan and the federal government have been served with the lawsuit

Reported by Samantha Maciag
First Posted: Jan 11, 2012

A multi-billion dollar lawsuit is being directed at the both the governments of Saskatchewan and Canada.

According to the Regina Leader-Post, the George Gordon First Nation has served the province and feds with a $10 billion lawsuit. The statement of claim says the First Nation has been cheated out of potash and oil developments.

Read more: http://ckom.com/story/george-gordon-first-nation-files-10-billion-lawsuit/39047

by NationTalk on January 11, 2012767 Views

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Blackstone Debuts Second Season – St. Albert Gazette

Blackstone debuts second season

Wednesday, Jan 11, 2012

In the past couple of weeks, the media has whipped itself into a frenzy publicizing new American shows premiering in 2012.

But for the Canadian made Blackstone, an eight-part dramatic series of a fictional First Nations band that must deal with today’s reality, the media has been surprisingly low-key.

What makes the award-winning Blackstone a cornerstone of Canadian television is that it takes an unvarnished look at corruption within a reservation. It also tackles issues ripped from the headlines.

Read more: http://www.stalbertgazette.com/article/20120111/SAG0302/301119994/-1/sag0302/blackstone-debuts-second-season

by NationTalk on January 11, 2012460 Views

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First Nation Sends City Bills for Water Use – Winnipeg Free Press

First Nation sends city bills for water use

Threatening to take legal action

By: Jen Skerritt
Posted: 01/11/2012

A First Nation near the source of Winnipeg’s drinking water has sent the city an $8-million bill every month since October over Winnipeg’s plans to sell water-and-sewer services to other municipalities.

Iskatewisaagegan No. 39 First Nation is also threatening to take legal action against the city after learning about its plans to install water and sewer pipes in the RM of West St. Paul.

Band councillor Leon Mandamin said the Shoal Lake community has repeatedly asked the City of Winnipeg to negotiate a settlement over the lake’s water. The community of 300 on-reserve residents is located at the east end of Indian Bay, a section of Shoal Lake that straddles the Manitoba-Ontario border.

Read more: http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/local/first-nation-sends-city-bills-for-water-use-137076793.html

by NationTalk on January 11, 2012457 Views

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Aboriginal Curators Look at Art from a New Perspective -Times Colonist

Aboriginal curators look at art from a new perspective

BY AMY SMART, TIMES COLONIST JANUARY 11, 2012 4:26 AM

As the first recipients of the only aboriginal curatorial fellowship in Canada, France Trépanier and Chris Creighton-Kelly have high ambitions.

The challenge: Reframe local art history without defining it solely through European culture.

So how is it done? “The answer is, with difficulty,” said Creighton-Kelly. “It’s not an easy thing to change 500 years of ways of looking at things.

Read more: http://www.timescolonist.com/travel/Aboriginal+curators+look+from+perspective/5977503/story.html#ixzz1jAVizzw3

by NationTalk on January 11, 2012397 Views

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Third-party management can be cause for concern on reserves – Montreal Gazette

Third-party management can be cause for concern on reserves

By Mary Agnes Welch and Mia Rabson, Winnipeg Free Press December 10, 2011

WINNIPEG — Roseau River is arguably the most tumultuous, dysfunctional First Nation in Manitoba, plagued by petty financial scandals, internal division and messy, confusing elections.

Lake St. Martin First Nation has 700 flood evacuees living in limbo, and its chief has been accused of stalling a relocation plan because the province wouldn’t hire his company to build the temporary houses.

In remote Wasagamack First Nation, most homes don’t have indoor toilets or running water, and the band needs about 450 more houses to alleviate chronic overcrowding.

Read more: http://www.globalwinnipeg.com/Third+party+management+cause+concern+reserves/5841878/story.html#ixzz1j4h5ZJOQ

by NationTalk on January 10, 2012577 Views

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Manitoba chief condemns pastor’s report suicide victims buried in dump – Montreal Gazette

Manitoba chief condemns pastor’s report suicide victims buried in dump

BY ALDO SANTIN, WINNIPEG FREE PRESS JANUARY 10, 2012

WINNIPEG — The chief of the Bloodvein First Nation in Manitoba has condemned the comments of an aboriginal pastor who claimed that victims of teen suicide are buried in the community’s landfill.

Chief Roland Hamilton said he found the news report of Pastor Robert McLean’s Sunday sermon to be disturbing and without substance.

“It’s very disturbing to hear that, especially when it comes from a well-known minister,” Hamilton said Monday.

Read more: http://www.globalwinnipeg.com/Manitoba+chief+condemns+pastor+report+suicide+victims+buried+dump/5970437/story.html#ixzz1j4emXDi1

by NationTalk on January 10, 2012476 Views

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Arctic Air a Flight of Fancy for Star – Postmedia News

Arctic Air a flight of fancy for star

Adam Beach leads new ensemble in throwback to adventure stories of yesteryear

By Alex Strachan, Postmedia News January 10, 2012

ARCTIC AIR

When: Premieres Jan. 10 at 9 ET/PT

Where: CBC

All in all, Adam Beach would rather be flying. He wouldn’t be stuck in Vancouver traffic on this early morning, for one thing, while driving his way to work on Arctic Air, writer-producer Ian Weir’s Yellowknife-set ensemble drama about renegade bush pilots in Canada’s Far North.

Beach plays a young, would-be business tycoon who feels “he’s left a lot of unturned stones in his life,” after he chose business school over the romance of the skies. His character, Bobby Martin, grew up the son of a legendary Dene bush pilot and, as a child, he would hang out in aircraft hangars, watching his father pore over battered vintage Second World War planes in an effort to make them airworthy. After his father died, however, Mar-tin opted to pursue a career as a venture capitalist, instead.

Read more: http://www.vancouversun.com/entertainment/movie-guide/Arctic+flight+fancy+star/5971628/story.html#ixzz1j4TxkML7

by NationTalk on January 10, 2012555 Views

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Aboriginal Affairs Minister Healthy and Back on the Job – Postmedia News

Aboriginal Affairs minister healthy and back on the job

After heart treatment, Vancouver Island North MP John Duncan is fully engaged in his work, staff says

By Peter O’Neil, Postmedia News January 10, 2012

Aboriginal Affairs Minster John Duncan was hospitalized recently with a heart problem but has made a “full recovery,” sources said Monday.

Conservatives were responding to speculation that Prime Minister Stephen Harper might engineer a cabinet shuffle that would move Duncan from the government’s front benches and require Harper to find fresh blood from his depleted B.C. caucus.

The Vancouver Island North MP has faced considerable media criticism for his handling of the Attawapiskat aboriginal housing crisis in northern Ontario, with some commentators suggesting in late 2011 that his weak performance was related to health issues.

Read more: http://www.timescolonist.com/health/Aboriginal+Affairs+minister+healthy+back/5971474/story.html#ixzz1j4TaqLDM

by NationTalk on January 10, 2012489 Views

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Aboriginal youth putts his way to golf school – Wawatay News

Aboriginal youth putts his way to golf school

Friday January 6, 2012

Tyson Morrisseau, a Grade 8 student in Couchiching First Nation, is set to go to the Hank Haney International Junior Golf Academy in South Carolina for the 2012/2013 school year.

“I was really excited I got in and I didn’t really believe I got in,” said Morrisseau, who is the first Native student to be accepted into the program.

Morriseau said he looks forward to learning more about something he loves doing and acting as a role model for other First Nations youth.

Read more: http://www.wawataynews.ca/archive/all/2012/1/6/aboriginal-youth-puts-his-way-golf-school_22237

by NationTalk on January 9, 2012646 Views

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Atleo Wants 2012 to Represent a ‘Critical Mass for Change for First Nations People’ – The Hill Times

Atleo wants 2012 to represent a ‘critical mass for change for First Nations people’

AFN National Chief Atleo calls on PM to follow through on endorsement of UN Declaration on Rights of Indigenous Peoples.

By CHRIS PLECASH | Jan. 09, 2012

It’s been more than a year since the federal government endorsed the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, but the ongoing and highly-publicized crisis in the northern Ontario reserve of Attawapiskat has made clear the need for greater action by the federal government in addressing the living standards of First Nations and aboriginal Canadians who are still poorly educated, whose health conditions are less than adequate, and whose unemployment rates are as high as 80 per cent in many communities.

Assembly of First Nations National Chief Shawn Atleo says he’s hopeful that the federal government will follow through on its endorsement of the declaration at the Jan. 24 First Nations-Crown Gathering in Ottawa, where First Nations leaders will meet with Prime Minister Harper and Aboriginal Affairs Minister John Duncan (Vancouver Island North, B.C.). Chief Atleo recently spoke with The Hill Times about the upcoming meeting and the future of Canada’s First Nations.

Read more: http://www.hilltimes.com/q-a/2012/01/09/atleo-wants-2012-to-represent-a-%E2%80%98critical-mass-for-change-for-first-nations-people%E2%80%99/29198

by NationTalk on January 9, 2012571 Views

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John Ivison: Attawapiskat’s toll on John Duncan may see him relieved in … – National Post

John Ivison: Attawapiskat’s toll on John Duncan may see him relieved in rumoured Cabinet shuffle

John Ivison Jan 9, 2012

As predictable as snow in January and mosquitos in June are Cabinet shuffle rumours. It’s been six months since the last mini-shuffle, so it was no surprise to hear suggestions that Stephen Harper may freshen his ministry before the House resumes.

Whispers in the salons of Ottawa suggest that John Duncan, the Aboriginal Affairs Minister, is facing health issues and may have to be relieved. Mr. Duncan stepped down temporarily a year ago to recover from heart valve surgery and it’s understood that the Attawapiskat housing crisis has taken a toll on his health.

His office would not comment on speculation, but sources close to the Minister said he is still fully engaged in his files and plans to particate in the Crown-First Nations Gathering between Mr. Harper and native chiefs in Ottawa later this month.

Read more: http://fullcomment.nationalpost.com/2012/01/09/attawapiskats-toll-on-john-duncan-may-see-him-relieved-as-cabinet-shuffle-rumours-fly/

by NationTalk on January 9, 2012661 Views

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Reserve youth buried in garbage dumps: Reverend – Canoe

By Marc Zienkiewicz, QMI Agency

LAC DU BONNET, Man. – Aboriginal youth in remote northern communities who commit suicide are being buried in garbage dumps, says the director of a Christian ministry.

Rev. Robert McLean of Aboriginal Missions, which serves 100 northern Manitoba and northwest Ontario communities, says the situation on the reserves has become so desperate that Aboriginal youth driven to suicide are being relegated to the same plots of land where the communities drop their trash.

“How can we find a new generation of church leadership when this is where our young people are ending up?” McLean told the congregation of Lac du Bonnet’s Abundant Life Chapel on Sunday.

Read more: http://cnews.canoe.ca/CNEWS/Canada/2012/01/09/19219671.html

by NationTalk on January 9, 2012581 Views

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Case Mulls First Nations’ Tobacco Shipping Rights – Postmedia News

Case mulls First Nations’ tobacco shipping rights

BY DOUGLAS QUAN, POSTMEDIA NEWS JANUARY 9, 2012

An aboriginal tobacco company that has thrived in Quebec and Ontario set out last year to begin selling and distributing its cigarettes in First Nations communities across Western Canada.

But from British Columbia to Manitoba, shipment after shipment of Rainbow Tobacco’s cigarettes wound up in the hands of authorities because provincial taxes hadn’t been paid on them.

The company, located on the Kahnawake reserve near Montreal, insists that as long as its products are distributed within or between aboriginal reserves only federal tax laws should apply. The company and its supporters add that provincial interference is hampering economic development in communities that need it most.

Read more: http://www.leaderpost.com/business/Case+mulls+First+Nations+tobacco+shipping+rights/5965313/story.html#ixzz1izMaPD4Q

by NationTalk on January 9, 2012555 Views

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Credentials of First Nations Special Advisor Questioned – Brantford Expositor

Credentials of First Nations special advisor questioned

By SUSAN GAMBLE , EXPOSITOR STAFF

Claudine VanEvery-Albert thinks there’s something fishy going on with the recent appointment of a special advisor on education for First Nations elementary schools.

After a nine-month search for a new superintendent of education, the process was abruptly halted and the spot filled by a person who doesn’t meet the qualifications and who lives hundreds of miles from here -a situation that has angered those who care about Six Nations’ education.

“This is a ploy,” says Claudine VanEvery-Albert, a former councillor who resigned from Indian and Northern Affairs 15 years ago to become an independent contractor in the education field.

Read more: http://www.brantfordexpositor.ca/ArticleDisplay.aspx?e=3429191

by NationTalk on January 9, 2012475 Views

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‘Communication Issues’ Hampering Aid for Attawapiskat Reserve: Tory MP – Postmedia News

‘Communication issues’ hampering aid for Attawapiskat reserve: Tory MP

By Thandi Fletcher, Postmedia News January 8, 2012

OTTAWA — A Conservative MP says there is a serious communication gap between the federal government and the chief of the troubled Attawapiskat, Ont., First Nation enveloped in a dire housing crisis.

“Clearly there seems to be an issue with communication . . . but what I urge them to do is to move past that issue,” said Kyle Seeback, in a CBC Radio interview Saturday. “Right now it’s winter. We should be working together to make sure that people have a warm and safe place to stay.”

Attawapiskat First Nation declared a state of emergency on Oct. 28 over deplorable living conditions in the community of about 2,000.

Read more: http://www.canada.com/life/Communication+issues+hampering+Attawapiskat+reserve+Tory/5962620/story.html#ixzz1izLskBPj

by NationTalk on January 9, 2012427 Views

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‘Blackstone’ Returns for Second Season – Toronto Sun

‘Blackstone’ returns for second season

BY BILL HARRIS ,QMI AGENCY
FIRST POSTED: SUNDAY, JANUARY 08, 2012

It’s not quite “Who Shot J.R.?” but the Canadian series Blackstone did end its first season with a cliffhanger involving a gun.

Now that Blackstone is returning for its second season, beginning Wednesday, Jan. 11 on APTN, the ramifications of whatever Andy did will be revealed.

As season one concluded, Andy Fraser (played by Eric Schweig) walked into a room at the Roxy with a gun and closed the door. Then viewers heard two gun shots.

Read more: http://www.torontosun.com/2012/01/08/blackstone-returns-for-second-season

by NationTalk on January 9, 2012428 Views

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First Nations Women Present Views of Their Community Through Photography – Sun Times

First Nations women present views of their community through photography

By Scott Dunn

From behind the lens of a camera, six young local First Nations women found their voices.

The resultant exhibit at the Owen Sound Artists’ Co-op shows the disheartening as well as the good parts of living at Cape Croker and Saugeen First Nation.

They selected images which present the community as they’ve experienced it at its worst: alcohol, prescription drugs, poverty and even the remoteness of reserve life.

Read more: http://www.owensoundsuntimes.com/ArticleDisplay.aspx?e=3429011

by NationTalk on January 9, 2012353 Views

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Tories Fashion Native Education System to Improve Life on Reserves – The Globe and Mail

Tories fashion native education system to improve life on reserves

JOHN IBBITSON
OTTAWA— From Monday’s Globe and Mail
Published Sunday, Jan. 08, 2012

A First Nations Education Act could arrive before Parliament this year, aimed at breaking the cycle of failure on reserve schools and representing one of the most important and unexpected priorities for the Harper government.

So far, this new initiative has been masked by accusations and controversy over who’s to blame for the crisis conditions at Attawapiskat, or discussion on whether natives on reserves should be given property rights.

But native education is where the Conservatives hope to make their mark, and they just might succeed.

Read more: http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/politics/john-ibbitson/tories-fashion-native-education-system-to-improve-life-on-reserves/article2295443/

by NationTalk on January 9, 2012457 Views

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U of A Medical Student Urges Aboriginal Teens to Stick With School No Matter What – Edmonton Journal

U of A medical student urges aboriginal teens to stick with school no matter what

By Chris Zdeb, edmontonjournal.com January 7, 2012

EDMONTON – Shey Eagle Bear’s life is a little more complicated than that of the average 24-year-old medical student.

Besides long days of study, he has the demands of being a husband and a dad to four-year-old son Cohen.

“It’s challenging,” he admits with a smile, “but you know you’re working toward a goal and that your family is going to be well supported.”

Read more: http://www.edmontonjournal.com/news/medical+student+urges+aboriginal+teens+stick+with+school+matter+what/5962683/story.html#ixzz1izJyqxD5

by NationTalk on January 9, 2012474 Views

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B.C. First Nations Fear Disastrous Spill is Inevitable – Edmonton Journal

B.C. First Nations fear disastrous spill is inevitable

By Gordon Hoekstra and Trish Audette, edmontonjournal.com January 7, 2012

The Gitga’at First Nation has been saying no to the Northern Gateway pipeline project since 2006.

The project will bring more than 200 huge tankers annually through the waters next to their tiny community of 160 in Hartley Bay at the entrance to Douglas Channel on B.C.’s northwest coast.

The risks and effects of an oil spill are simply not worth any economic benefits, which the First Nation view as nil, says Marvin Robinson, a spokesman for the community.

Read more: http://www.canada.com/news/First+Nations+fear+disastrous+spill+inevitable/5962854/story.html#ixzz1izJYRa62

by NationTalk on January 9, 2012413 Views

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First Nations funds mishandled by Ottawa, audits show – CBC

First Nations funds mishandled by Ottawa, audits show

The Canadian Press Posted: Jan 5, 2012

Two government audits show Ottawa is earmarking about a billion dollars a year to build and repair First Nations infrastructure, but its myriad of officials are not keeping proper tabs on how the money is spent.

Even as Prime Minister Stephen Harper accuses the Attawapiskat First Nations of mismanaging federal funds, the internal audits posted recently suggest the criticism could apply to the federal bureaucracy as well.

The audits say there are “significant gaps” in how the on-reserve infrastructure funding is controlled, and that the financial reporting system is riddled with inconsistencies.

Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/story/2012/01/05/first-nations-audits-infrastructure.html

by NationTalk on January 9, 2012482 Views

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Attawapiskat chief demands funding, denies accusation – CBC

Attawapiskat chief demands funding, denies accusation

‘Tell me where the trust is,’ Theresa Spence asks in angry letter to aboriginal affairs minister

CBC News Posted: Jan 6, 2012
Last Updated: Jan 7, 2012

Attawapiskat First Nation Chief Theresa Spence has fired off a lengthy letter denying the accusation made Thursday by Aboriginal Affairs Minister John Duncan that her council is refusing to release information the government-appointed third-party manager needs to begin paying the community’s bills.

In her letter dated Jan. 5, Spence repeats her demand that $1.5 million in operational funds be released to her council so the community can meet its payroll and other ongoing expenses.

The government-appointed manager, BDO Dunwoody, is refusing to pass on the federal funding. It interprets its contract with the federal government to provide third-party management as meaning it should now make payments on behalf of Attawapiskat.

Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/story/2012/01/06/pol-attawapiskat-friday.html

by NationTalk on January 9, 2012521 Views

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Hobbema Hockey Tyke to Bear Flag at New Year’s Eve World Junior Champions

Ethan Smallboy has a big hockey heart. The eight-year-old lives and breathes hockey, says his father, and keeps his grades up so he can continue playing.

This is no small feat given his world: He is growing up on the violence-plagued reserve of Hobbema, where at least two shootings, one of a five-year-old boy, occurred in 2011.

Such violence, however, is but on the periphery for Ethan: He has been chosen to bear the Canadian flag for the country’s hockey team at the World Junior Championships in Edmonton on New Year’s Eve.

Read more:http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2011/12/30/hobbema-hockey-tyke-to-bear-flag-at-new-years-eve-world-junior-championships-70027

by NationTalk on January 9, 2012546 Views

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Gitxsan Treaty Society Doesn’t Have Authority to Sign Deals with Enbridge – Vancouver Sun

Gitxsan Treaty Society doesn’t have authority to sign deals with Enbridge

By Neil J. Sterritt, Vancouver Sun January 6, 2012

The Gitxsan Nation and people have been in the news a lot lately, mainly in relation to the pro-posed Northern Gateway oil pipeline. The pipeline would cross two significant salmon spawning rivers and several streams that eventually flow into the traditional territories of the Gitxsan, but the pipeline itself does not cross Gitxsan territory. The chief negotiator and executive director of the Gitxsan Treaty Society claimed in December that the society had reached an agreement with Enbridge Inc., the proponent of the pipeline, on behalf of the Gitxsan Nation. It is doubtful that the society had the legal or moral authority to make such an agreement, and it has been a subject of considerable debate among the Gitxsan people.

Read more: http://www.vancouversun.com/news/Gitxsan+Treaty+Society+doesn+have+authority+sign+deals+with+Enbridge/5956218/story.html#ixzz1ihO2I14Y

by NationTalk on January 6, 2012722 Views

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Enoch Chief Says Reserve’s Eviction Bylaw Works – Edmonton Journal

Enoch chief says reserve’s eviction bylaw works

By Elise Stolte, edmontonjournal.com January 5, 2012

HOBBEMA – A seven-year-old bylaw giving an Enoch First Nation tribunal the right to evict members from the community has made the reserve a safer place, says the chief.

Members of the Samson Cree in Hobbema passed a similar bylaw by a margin of less than 100 votes in a referendum Wednesday. The bylaw allows council to evict troublemakers — not even allowing them to return home for a powwow or funeral without permission — if they have been convicted of serious criminal offences and are deemed to be ongoing safety threats.

Read more: http://www.canada.com/news/Enoch+chief+says+reserve+eviction+bylaw+works/5954111/story.html#ixzz1ihNfaXOI

by NationTalk on January 6, 20121223 Views

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Attawapiskat still at odds with third-party manager – CBC.ca

Attawapiskat still at odds with third-party manager

CBC News Posted: Jan 6, 2012

The war of words between the Attawapiskat First nation and the federal government continues.

The band is still refusing to work with a third party manager put in place by Aboriginal Affairs.

The government made the move after the first nation declared a state of emergency over a severe housing shortage more than two months ago.

In a statement released Thursday, the Attawapiskat First Nation said it fears that, under third-party management, the teachers’ payroll and other payments won’t be made — compromising services on the reserve.

Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/sudbury/story/2012/01/06/sby-attawapiskat-duncan-release.html

by NationTalk on January 6, 2012555 Views

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Fire tragedies spark warning – Vancouver Sun

Fire tragedies spark warning

‘Calamitous’ spate in B.C. kills seven, spurring call for vigilance

By Katie Derosa And Judith Lavoie, Times Colonist January 6, 2012

A “calamitous” spate of fire deaths has prompted a safety warning from the Coroners Service and the Office of the Fire Commissioner about the need for vigilance when living in a trailer or mobile home.

On New Year’s Day, a 20-year-old woman died in a 6 a.m. blaze in her trailer on the Cowichan reserve. The victim is believed to be Crystal Joe, but the coroner has yet to confirm the identity of the badly charred body.

On Dec. 29, Wilfred Joseph Henry Jr., 44, died after flames consumed a single-wide trailer on the Tsartlip First Nation reserve at Brentwood Bay.

Sidney-North Saanich RCMP said eight people were living in the trailer, but Henry was alone when the fire started.

Read more: http://www.timescolonist.com/news/Fire+tragedies+spark+warning/5956023/story.html#ixzz1ihMgZwbn

by NationTalk on January 6, 2012445 Views

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Friendship centre loses funding – Interlake Spectator

Friendship centre loses funding

By Teresa Carey

A grant of $84,500 through the federal Department of Canadian Heritage has fallen through for the Riverton & District Friendship Centre, a fixture in Riverton for 30 years, shaking the organization right down to its very foundation.

It is a grant which the centre has enjoyed for the past 11 years, and which it has come to rely on. The funding has made possible all sorts of Aboriginal youth programming, directed to a wide geographical area that went well beyond the Village of Riverton’s borders.

“We really thought this was going to come through,” said Tanis Grimolfson, Executive Director of the Riverton & District Friendship Centre (RDFC).

Read more: http://www.interlakespectator.com/ArticleDisplay.aspx?e=3427576

by NationTalk on January 6, 2012545 Views

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Missing the real problem With aboriginal sentencing – The Province

Missing the real problem With aboriginal sentencing

By Eli Bryan Nelson, The Province January 6, 2012

I strongly disagree with columnist Lorne Gunter’s off-kilter piece on the so-called forced legal down-sizing of sentencing of aboriginal offenders.

I do agree that criminality should receive sentencing in line with the crime, but Gunter focuses on one aspect of criminal sentencing while ignoring the real problem.

By his estimation, one out of five race-identifiable criminals in custody is aboriginal, when only roughly four per cent of the populace is aboriginal.

Read more: http://www.theprovince.com/Missing+real+problem+With+aboriginal+sentencing/5955896/story.html#ixzz1ihLpXDvP

by NationTalk on January 6, 2012487 Views

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For Tsawwassen First Nation, development is the name of the game – Globe and Mail

For Tsawwassen First Nation, development is the name of the game

ROD MICKLEBURGH
From Friday’s Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, Jan. 05, 2012

The landmark 2009 agreement between government and the Tsawwassen First Nation was rightly hailed as the country’s first modern urban treaty.

Unlike many native groups who occupy relatively isolated areas, surrounded by forested Crown land, Tsawwassen natives are hemmed in by a coal port, a ferry terminal and the municipality of Delta.

When they sneeze, other residents of the Lower Mainland can catch cold. Now, we are beginning to learn what that means.

Long gone are hunting, gathering and the old ways of aboriginal life. The new name of the game is development.

Read more: http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/british-columbia/rod-mickleburgh/for-tsawwassen-first-nation-development-is-the-name-of-the-game/article2293328/

by NationTalk on January 6, 2012422 Views

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Lorne Gunter: Fixing First Nation reserves is an inside job – National Post

Lorne Gunter: Fixing First Nation reserves is an inside job

Lorne Gunter Jan 5, 2012

Jeanette Peterson and Kirk Buffalo live more than 3,600 kilometres apart, almost on opposite ends of the country. Yet the two are connected by their desire to improve their respective First Nations communities.

Ms. Peterson is the newly elected Chief of Nova Scotia’s Annapolis Valley reserve, while Mr. Buffalo is a new Councillor at the Samson Cree band on central Alberta’s Hobbema reserve. Chief Peterson wants to bring financial accountability to her tiny community of 112 people, while Councillor Buffalo is attempting to clean up his community of 3,000, which has been plagued by murders, drive-by shootings, gang activity and drug dealing.

Read more: http://fullcomment.nationalpost.com/2012/01/05/lorne-gunter-fixing-first-nation-reserves-is-an-inside-job/

by NationTalk on January 6, 2012488 Views

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Feds planning to keep Indian Act despite opposition from First Nations leaders – Toronto Sun

Feds planning to keep Indian Act despite opposition from First Nations leaders

BY KRISTY KIRKUP, PARLIAMENTARY BUREAU
FIRST POSTED: THURSDAY, JANUARY 05, 2012

OTTAWA – The government doesn’t plan to scrap the Indian Act, despite loud cries from First Nations leaders and experts on indigenous affairs.

“Getting rid of it at this particular point is not a specific agenda item,” said Greg Rickford, the parliamentary secretary to Aboriginal Affairs Minister John Duncan.

The MP from Kenora, Ont., says the government’s priority right now is to modernize parts of the 136-year-old statute.

“We are making big strides and agree in consensus with First Nations leadership that there’s got to be ways that communities and First Nations leadership can circumvent or get out from underneath the Indian Act,” he said.

Read more: http://www.torontosun.com/2012/01/05/feds-planning-to-keep-indian-act-despite-opposition-from-first-nations-leaders

by NationTalk on January 6, 2012400 Views

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Northern Ontario first nation wins injunction to stop exploration by Solid Gold – CP

Northern Ontario first nation wins injunction to stop exploration by Solid Gold

By The Canadian Press

TORONTO – A northern Ontario First Nation has won an injunction to prevent junior miner Solid Gold Resources from drilling on their land.

In a decision this week Ontario Superior Court of Justice Carol Brown sided with the First Nations community, saying Solid Gold (TSXV:SLD) failed to engage in consultation.

She prohibited Solid Gold from any further exploration in the area for 120 days, during which time the company and the provincial government must undergo a proper consultation process with Wahgoshig.

Read more: http://ca.news.yahoo.com/northern-ontario-first-nation-wins-injunction-stop-exploration-152754256.html

by NationTalk on January 5, 2012497 Views

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Alberta First Nation votes to give band power to evict gang members – Yahoo News

Alberta First Nation votes to give band power to evict gang members

By The Canadian Press

HOBBEMA, Alta. – A crime-troubled First Nation south of Edmonton has voted to give community leaders the power to evict suspected gang members.

When ballots were counted Wednesday night, the result was 479 in favour and 369 against the proposed bylaw, which must still be ratified by the Department of Indian Affairs.

If that is done, it would mean any 25 residents of the 7,000-member Samson Cree band in Hobbema could apply to have someone legally removed from the reserve.

Read more: http://ca.news.yahoo.com/alberta-first-nation-voting-whether-band-power-evict-181812379.html

by NationTalk on January 5, 2012481 Views

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Internal audits question Ottawa’s oversight of first-nations infrastructure – Globe and Mail

Audits question Ottawa’s oversight of first-nations infrastructure

HEATHER SCOFFIELD
OTTAWA— The Canadian Press
Published Thursday, Jan. 05, 2012

Two government audits show Ottawa is earmarking about a billion dollars a year to build and repair first-nations infrastructure, but its myriad officials are not keeping proper tabs on how the money is spent.

Even as Prime Minister Stephen Harper accuses the Attawapiskat First Nations of mismanaging federal funds, the internal audits posted recently suggest the criticism could apply to the federal bureaucracy as well.

The audits say there are “significant gaps” in how the on-reserve infrastructure funding is controlled, and that the financial reporting system is riddled with inconsistencies.

Read more: http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/politics/internal-audits-question-ottawas-oversight-of-first-nations-infrastructure/article2292554/?utm_medium=Feeds%3A%20RSS%2FAtom&utm_source=Home&utm_content=2292554

by NationTalk on January 5, 2012570 Views

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Aboriginal opposition to Gateway only good news – Canada.com

Aboriginal opposition to Gateway only good news

BY FRANK G. STERLE AND JR., THE DAILY NEWS JANUARY 5, 2012

When I recently read about our prime minister’s apparent delight in cutting corporate taxes, of course at lower income Canadians’ expense, it was like getting kicked in the stomach – twice.

First, even before the latest corporate tax cut takes effect later this year, our federal corporate tax rate is less than half that of the United States. Not even half of what the U.S. – the taxbreaks for the very richest nut-capital of the universe – demands that its big corporate citizens contribute to government coffers!

Read more: http://www.canada.com/Aboriginal+opposition+Gateway+only+good+news/5950033/story.html

by NationTalk on January 5, 2012477 Views

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Centre offers programs for youth – NorthernLife.ca

Centre offers programs for youth

Jan 04, 2012
By: Sudbury Northern Life Student

Program leaders are calling on the youth of Sudbury to come out and participate in the youth programs available at the N’swakamok Native Friendship Centre.

The Cultural Connections for Aboriginal Youth (CCAY) program leaders Warren Kapashesit and Stephanie Assinewai are promoting the youth programs through social networking sites, through the distribution of program calendars and through the Rainbow School Board and the Catholic School Board of Sudbury.

“In some activities, we get as few as three people to as much as 17 participants. Generally we have about 10, but I would really like to see that number increase,” Kapashesit said.

Read more: http://www.northernlife.ca/news/localNews/2012/01/05-aboriginal-centre-sudbury.aspx

by NationTalk on January 5, 2012522 Views

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Doubly sad – Calgary Herald

Doubly sad

By Sue Bussoli, Calgary Herald January 5, 2012

Re: “Bad logic behind light Caledonia sentence,” Christie Blatchford, Opinion, Jan. 3.

Our aboriginal dilemma will never be resolved. It is pushed under the rug of bureaucracy, either with our government or the aboriginals themselves. Christie Blatchford brings a very sad situation to our attention. A hard-working construction worker is beaten to the point of permanent brain-injury state by a 22-year-old aboriginal man. Our laws are slanted in favour of the eternally victimized aboriginals because we need to lighten the overpopulated and aboriginal prison numbers. So the 22-year-old gets a paltry two years.

Read more: http://www.calgaryherald.com/Doubly/5949108/story.html#ixzz1ibs94YXy

by NationTalk on January 5, 2012484 Views

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