S Mainstream Aboriginal Related News

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Aboriginal Youths Find Common Ground in Theatre – Winnipeg Free Press

Aboriginal youths find common ground in theatre

By: Alison Mayes
Posted: 04/26/2012

THEY live on opposite sides of the globe, but two groups of aboriginal youth are finding much in common during a 10-day cultural meet-up at Manitoba Theatre for Young People.

The Marrugeku Theatre Company comes from Broome, a coastal town in remote northwestern Australia, on the traditional lands of the Yawuru people.

The 18-year-old troupe, which has toured to Europe, the Philippines and Brazil, reinterprets stories from indigenous culture in its contemporary dance-theatre shows.

It’s currently here performing Buru, the season-closing show at MTYP. The colourful 40-minute production, aimed at ages eight and up, has one remaining public performance on Friday night. It mixes rap and hip-hop music with acrobatic stilt dancing and storytelling.

Read more: http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/opinion/columnists/aboriginal-youths-find-common-ground-in-theatre-149015415.html

by NationTalk on April 27, 2012517 Views

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BC Metis Federation Passes Resolution to Oppose the Enbridge Gateway Pipeline Project April 24th 2012

(Vancouver, BC) The BC Métis Federation board members met on Wednesday, April 24th, 2012 and during their board meeting passed a resolution to oppose the proposed Enbridge Northern Gateway Pipelines Project on behalf of their members and Métis communities.

by northernbc2010 on April 26, 2012590 Views

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SMVS celebrates arrival of hockey equipment – La Ronge Northerner

SMVS celebrates arrival of hockey equipment

Students and staff at Senator Myles Venne School (SMVS) celebrated the long-awaited arrival of 25 sets of hockey equipment from the NHL Players Association Goals and Dreams Fund on Friday, April 6.

The school applied for and received 25 complete sets of hockey equipment with a value of approximately $25,000 from the NHLPA.

Sam Roberts, councillor for the Lac La Ronge Indian Band (LLRIB) was also on hand for the celebrations.

According to their website the “NHLPA Goals & Dreams assists volunteer based programs that help economically disadvantaged children play the great sport of hockey. NHLPA members believe that more children should have the opportunity to play hockey– a sport that educates players in teamwork, commitment, discipline and physical fitness. Since the inception of the program, more than 60,000 children in 25 countries have benefited from equipment donations from their NHL heroes.

Read more: http://www.townoflaronge.ca/TheNortherner/Story.php?id=966

by NationTalk on April 26, 2012721 Views

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Sioux Lookout business owner resents racism accusation – CBC

Sioux Lookout business owner resents racism accusation

Coffee shop owner says effort to take ‘our town back’ not racist

Jody Porter CBC News Posted: Apr 24, 2012

A Sioux Lookout business owner says she wants to clean up the streets of the town, but First Nations leaders say her efforts smack of racism.

Nancy Roy said she launched a survey of residents after a recent rash of violence in downtown Sioux Lookout. She invited people to share their thoughts, in writing, about their safety concerns.

“Sign the sheet if you want to make a difference…” it reads. “Is it a community you want to celebrate 100 years with cop cars and ambulances roaring around and blood on our streets???? I want our town back!”

Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/thunder-bay/story/2012/04/24/tby-sioux-lookout-racism.html

by NationTalk on April 26, 2012797 Views

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Youth learn new skills at soccer camp – Williams Lake Tribune

Youth learn new skills at soccer camp

Greg Sabatino – Williams Lake Tribune
Published: April 24, 2012

For 121 Williams Lake youth, a chance to learn the game of soccer at a recent clinic was a welcome experience.

Bruce Baptiste, who co-ordinated the soccer camp through the Punky Lake Wilderness Camp Society, said the camp was funded by the Aboriginal Sports, Recreation and Physical Activity Partners Council, and was geared toward First Nations youth.

He then added the expertise of members and coaches from the Williams Lake Youth Soccer Association to help run the camp, held in the Columneetza secondary gymnasium.

Read more: http://www.wltribune.com/sports/148602705.html

by NationTalk on April 26, 2012701 Views

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BC Metis Federation Passes Resolution to Oppose the Enbridge Gateway Pipeline Project April 24th 2012

(Vancouver, BC) The BC Métis Federation board members met on Wednesday, April 24th, 2012 and during their board meeting passed a resolution to oppose the proposed Enbridge Northern Gateway Pipelines Project on behalf of their members and Métis communities.

The BC Métis Federation is a provincial Métis representative organization established in 2011 and has signed cooperation agreements with Métis communities from Fort St. John, Surrey, Vancouver, North Saanich, and Kelly Lake. BC Métis Federation has also reached agreements with the Métis Veterans Association – BC and other service delivery organizations. The BC Métis Federation launched a provincial membership card in September 2011 and continues to receive membership applications from all over British Columbia while recognizing thousands of members within each of the Métis communities working with the BC Métis Federation, recognizing that some will be directly impacted by the proposed Enbridge Northern Gateway Pipelines Project.

BC Métis Federation President Henry stated, “This project has been a contentious conversation topic within our Métis community for the last few years. We began to review our position carefully after we heard growing frustration and concerns about the lack of proper consultation for Métis people, many of which could be directly impacted if the project proceeds.”

President Henry added, “We completed months of community meetings, provided an opportunity for an online poll where over 480 Métis people participated, and utilized our online Métis Coffee Talk show to share project information. The results of the significant BC Métis Federation process provided a clear mandate for our board to draft a resolution that we believed reflected the majority voice for our Métis members. ”

by northernbc2010 on April 26, 2012426 Views

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Spring means business for Aboriginal communities – Financial Post

Spring means business for Aboriginal communities

Clint Davis Apr 23, 2012

For Aboriginal communities, spring means business. That’s not to say business activity becomes dormant in the winter, but for many communities some operations are seasonal. Activities such as fishing, forestry, marine transportation and mineral exploration mean additional employment and revenue for the Aboriginal community during the spring and summer months.

One such community business is the Nunatsiavut Group of Companies (NGC). NGC is the economic arm of Nunatsiavut Government in northern Labrador that represents five coastal communities and more than 7,000 members located all over the world. Nunatsiavut was the last Inuit land claim to be settled in Canada. Some of the highlights of that claim include outright ownership of 15,800 sq km of land, a self-government agreement and nearly $200-million to implement the claim.

I am highlighting NGC, because I am a Nunatsiavut beneficiary and chair of the board of directors for NGC, and I believe we have a wonderful story to tell.

Read more: http://business.financialpost.com/2012/04/23/spring-means-business-for-aboriginal-communities/

by NationTalk on April 23, 2012424 Views

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TRU seeks to curb drop-out rate for First Nations – kamloopsnews.ca

TRU seeks to curb drop-out rate for First Nations

APRIL 22, 2012
BY SYLVIE PAILLARD
DAILY NEWS STAFF REPORTER

An inordinate number of First Nations students are dropping out of TRU in the first year, and a new academic partnership is trying get to the bottom of it.

TRU Aboriginal education director Nathan Matthew is spearheading an initiative to determine why upwards of 45 per cent of first year Aboriginal students drop out of TRU while about 30 per cent of non-Aboriginal students drop out.

Matthew could not be reached by press time.

The university has asked the Kamloops Thompson school district to help.

Read more: http://www.kamloopsnews.ca/article/20120422/KAMLOOPS0101/120429951/-1/kamloops01/tru-seeks-to-curb-drop-out-rate-for-first-nations

by NationTalk on April 23, 2012518 Views

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Beyond musty artifacts – Ottawa Citizen

Beyond musty artifacts

Museums should be hotbeds for lively debate, says a Carleton professor whose book has been nominated for the Donner Prize

By Peter Robb, Ottawa Citizen April 23, 2012

OTTAWA — In 1968, Ruth Phillips and her husband Mark were attending the University of California in Berkley. It was right in the middle of the white heat of protest over Vietnam on U.S. campuses and the two young Americans were definitely against the war.

So when Mark got his notice to take a physical as part of the preparation for military service, the couple packed up and headed to Canada, part of a flood of young people fleeing their homeland.

As Phillips tells it, she and Mark landed at a border crossing, said they wanted to become Canadian citizens, took a test and that was it. It was a very different time.

Read more: http://www.ottawacitizen.com/travel/Beyond+musty+artifacts/6503785/story.html#ixzz1stLCIoTW

by NationTalk on April 23, 2012545 Views

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Bad water foils attempt to build healthy community – CBC.ca

Bad water foils attempt to build healthy community

Slate Falls First Nation says Aboriginal Affairs won’t fund proper water system

Jody Porter CBC News Posted: Apr 23, 2012

Slate Falls First Nation says it’s paying a price for trying to build a more liveable First Nation community.

Back in the 1990s, when residents moved to the new reserve located 120 km north of Sioux Lookout, leaders planned houses spread out in a horse shoe pattern around the lake. Each duplex in the community has lakefront access, giving residents space and access to the land and water.

“Even though it looks nice, there are problems, there are issues,” said band councillor Katy Loon.

The biggest problem is the lack of safe drinking water. Houses are served by a series of pump houses where water is drawn from the lake, run through a filter and briefly passed through a chlorination system. But the system lacks the capacity to properly rid the water of e-coli and other contaminants.

Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/thunder-bay/story/2012/04/23/tby-slate-falls-water.html

by NationTalk on April 23, 2012596 Views

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Disgraced Six Nations doctor Monture kills himself – Hamilton Spectator

Disgraced Six Nations doctor Monture kills himself

John Burman Mon Apr 23 2012

OHSWEKEN A controversial Six Nations doctor has been found dead, two days before he was due to be sentenced for fraudulently billing the Ontario Health Insurance Plan an estimated $2.5 million.

The body of Dr. Michael Monture of Six Nations was found in the bush behind a 2nd Line home Saturday at 2 a.m.

The doctor was also involved in an ongoing disciplinary hearing before the Ontario College of Physicians and Surgeons to determine if he had “engaged in disgraceful, dishonourable or unprofessional conduct and/or the sexual abuse of a patient …” between 2000 and 2004.

Read more: http://www.thespec.com/news/crime/article/710395–disgraced-six-nations-doctor-monture-kills-himself

by NationTalk on April 23, 20121415 Views

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Nunavut Students Finalists in National Entrepreneur Contest – Nunatsiaq Online

Nunavut students finalists in national entrepreneur contest

“This is more about exposure to the business world”

April 23, 2012
JUSTIN NOBEL

What’s the best place in Coral Harbour to get a coffee?

Trick question — there’s none.

So a team of students at Sakku School created a plan for one, which would be part of a mini-mall that would also include a crafts shop and a store that sells formal wear, and submitted it to the Business Development Bank of Canada’s E-Spirit competition.

The students qualified for the finals and in mid-May will be traveling to Winnipeg to present their business plan in front of more than 150 high school students from aboriginal communities across Canada.

Read more: http://www.nunatsiaqonline.ca/stories/article/65674nunavut_students_finalists_in_national_entrepreneur_contest/

by NationTalk on April 23, 2012515 Views

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Look to Hiring First Nations – The StarPhoenix

Look to hiring First Nations

The StarPhoenix April 23, 2012

When it comes to bringing in foreign workers, there is no discouraging Immigration Minister Rob Norris.

He insisted last week that the federal government must increase to 6,000 the number of immigrants Saskatchewan can bring in through the provincial nominee program annually, up from the current limit of 4,000. On the surface, it seems the increase is legitimate. As Mr. Norris notes, Saskatchewan already has more than 11,000 jobs waiting for the newcomers.

But, as federal Immigration Minister Jason Kenney and Federation of Saskatchewan Indian Nations vice-chief Morley Watson keep reminding Mr. Norris’s government, accelerating the pace of immigration isn’t the only way to address the labour shortage.

Read more: http://www.thestarphoenix.com/news/Look+hiring+First+Nations/6501498/story.html#ixzz1stHI4Yzc

by NationTalk on April 23, 2012609 Views

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Lessons from Third World Could Help Fix Circumpolar Health Crisis: Experts – Nunatsiaq Online

Lessons from Third World could help fix circumpolar health crisis: experts

“Inuit from the Arctic, San from the Kalahari, and Yanomami of the Amazon have shared concerns”

April 22, 2012
JANE GEORGE

MONTREAL — In an era of federal government cutbacks, some of the strategies used to provide low-cost health solutions in Africa and other areas of the poor, developing world could be used in the circumpolar region, experts said April 22 at a conference in Montreal.

That’s among the suggestions proposed during a panel on global health and circumpolar perspectives held in Montreal, as the International Polar Year science conference gets underway.

“Inuit from the Arctic, San from the Kalahari, and Yanomami of the Amazon have shared concerns,” said Dr. Jeff Reading of the Centre of Aboriginal Health research at the University of Victoria, during a panel discussion.

Read more: http://www.nunatsiaqonline.ca/stories/article/65674third-world_lessons_could_help_deal_with_circumpolar_health_crisis_exp/

by NationTalk on April 23, 2012408 Views

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Sask. First Nation to Launch its Own GST – 650 CKOM

Sask. First Nation to launch its own GST

Revenues will go to the band rather than the federal government

Reported by News Talk Radio staff
First Posted: Apr 22, 2012

A Saskatchewan First Nation is set to introduce its own form of the Goods and Services Tax where the collected revenues will be diverted back to the band instead of Ottawa.

The Nekaneet First Nation, located near Maple Creek, has been given the nod of approval from the federal government to begin charging taxes on its own land under the First Nations Goods and Services Act.

This is not the first time a First Nations group has launched its own GST. Three years ago, the Whitecap Dakota First Nation, located south of Saskatoon, was the first to introduce a band-wide levy.

Read more: http://www.newstalk650.com/story/sask-first-nation-launch-its-own-gst/53558

by NationTalk on April 23, 2012670 Views

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Ideas Sought for Transition Facility – The Chronicle-Journal

Ideas sought for transition facility

Northwest Bureau
Sunday, April 22, 2012

The Keewatin-Patricia District School Board is seeking public input into a proposal to turn the former Pinewood Public School into a high-school transition facility for aboriginal students from the far North.

Board spokeswoman Sheena Valley says that the board is in the preliminary stages of developing a plan to use the school to support the transition of First Nation students from remote communities into secondary school.

The plan, being developed in partnership with Keewaytinook Okimakanak, would see the school renovated to include a residence for students and supervisory staff.

Read more: http://www.chroniclejournal.com/content/news/local/2012/04/22/ideas-sought-transition-facility

by NationTalk on April 23, 2012505 Views

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Foraging First Nations Class Disrupted by Police – Times Colonist

Foraging First Nations class disrupted by police

Students ordered to drop knives, sparking protest

BY JUDITH LAVOIE, TIMES COLONIST APRIL 22, 2012

An outdoor class on traditional First Nations practices came to an abrupt end this week after police arrived and told students to drop the knives they were using to forage for roots and plants.

High school students from Lau,Welnew Tribal School were shaken by the incident at Centennial Park in Central Saanich. A Facebook group set up to protest police actions immediately drew almost 2,000 supporters.

However, Central Saanich police defended their response, saying they needed to ensure park users were safe after a caller reported a group of young people in the park throwing knives.

Read more: http://www.timescolonist.com/Foraging+First+Nations+class+disrupted+police/6499250/story.html#ixzz1stDp6PO6

by NationTalk on April 23, 2012561 Views

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First Nation’s Water Imperils Economy, Health and Maybe Even Pregnancies – Winnipeg Free Press

First Nation’s water imperils economy, health and maybe even pregnancies

By: Heather Scoffield, The Canadian Press
Posted: 04/22/2012

SLATE FALLS, Ont. – Like many remote First Nations, Slate Falls is surrounded by abundant, sparkling blue water that it can’t seem to drink or pump sufficiently into its houses.

The water defines this northwestern Ontario community. It gives the First Nation its name, it determines the design of the neighbourhoods, and it lends solace to the community’s 200 inhabitants.

But the lack of proper water infrastructure also has a pervasive effect on the band’s economy, its health and everyday living conditions on the reserve just north of Sioux Lookout.

Slate Falls is one of the more than 300 First Nations in Canada with a water system that has been deemed high risk, according to a ground-breaking national assessment published last year.

Read more: http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/arts-and-life/life/health/first-nations-water-imperils-economy-health-and-maybe-even-pregnancies-148444775.html

by NationTalk on April 23, 2012446 Views

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Environmentalists, First Nations Protest Proposed B.C. Ski Resort – Postmedia News

Environmentalists, First Nations protest proposed B.C. ski resort

BY EVA FERGUSON, POSTMEDIA NEWS APRIL 22, 2012

INVERMERE, B.C. — Environmentalists, First Nations people, politicians and local celebrities are combining efforts to continue the passionate battle against approval of Jumbo Glacier Ski Resort near this vacation community southwest of Calgary.

Last month, B.C.’s Liberal government approved a controversial $1-billion ski resort development that has divided the community between those who want a boon to business and others who fear destruction of the wilderness and grizzly bear habitat.

Environmentalists with Wildsight, a local advocacy group based in Kimberley, B.C., with efforts focused on protecting the Columbia Mountains, the southern Rockies and the Upper Columbia River Valley, are voicing their continued opposition by lobbying developers now visiting the site.

Read more: http://www.vancouversun.com/travel/Environmentalists+First+Nations+protest+proposed+resort/6500533/story.html

by NationTalk on April 23, 2012578 Views

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Aboriginal Day Live at Forks, June 23 – Winnipeg Free Press

Aboriginal Day Live at Forks, June 23

By: Staff Writer
Posted: 04/21/2012

THE Forks will once again be the home of APTN’s Aboriginal Day Live and Celebration, a daylong event and live-broadcast concert that takes place on Saturday, June 23.

Co-hosts for Aboriginal Day Live are APTN personalities Don Kelly (Fish Out of Water), Candy Palmater (The Candy Show) and Chantelle (Upload). The full roster for the free concert will be announced next month.

In addition to the concert, The Forks will be the site of a full day of family-friendly events, including an artisans’ village, traditional music and dance performances, live art installations, storytelling and traditional food.

Read more: http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/arts-and-life/entertainment/arts/aboriginal-day-live-at-forks-june-23-148364795.html

by NationTalk on April 23, 2012748 Views

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First Nations Fishing Rights Upheld – Coast Reporter

First Nations fishing rights upheld

APRIL 21, 2012
BEN INGRAM/STAFF WRITER

The Supreme Court of Canada’s recent decision to deny the Crown’s appeal in the Ahousaht fishing rights case has been hailed by some as a step in the right direction for First Nation resource claims.

Late last month, the Supreme Court of Canada rejected leave for the Crown to appeal a lower court decision that said five Vancouver Island aboriginal bands, including Ahousaht, “have aboriginal rights to fish for any species within certain defined fishing territories and to sell that fish.”

Ahousaht had been represented by Assembly of First Nations chief Shawn Atleo in a dispute that also included the Ehattesaht, the Hesquiaht, the Mowachaht/Muchalaht and Tla-o-qui-aht Indian bands.

Read more: http://www.coastreporter.net/article/20120421/SECHELT0101/304219998/-1/sechelt/first-nations-fishing-rights-upheld

by NationTalk on April 23, 2012559 Views

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Redford Misses Meeting with Chiefs – Edmonton Journal

Redford misses meeting with chiefs

By Nicki Thomas, Edmonton Journal April 21, 2012

Nearing the end of a campaign that has seen little engagement on aboriginal issues, Treaty 6 chiefs slammed Progressive Conservative Leader Alison Redford, the only no-show to a day of meetings with party leaders.

Liberal Leader Raj Sherman, Wildrose Leader Danielle Smith and NDP Leader Brian Mason each met with the 18 chiefs throughout the day Thursday in Edmonton, blocks from where the leaders held a noon-hour public forum.

Redford had a scheduling conflict, a party spokeswoman said, but Enoch Chief Ron Morin dismissed the excuse, saying alternative dates had also been turned down.

Read more: http://www.calgaryherald.com/news/Holocaust+memories+will+kept+alive+Calgary/6496886/story.html#ixzz1stAisZsH

by NationTalk on April 23, 2012542 Views

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Diabetes Symposium to help residents with questions – fortmcmurraytoday.com

Diabetes Symposium to help residents with questions

By Amanda Richardson

Promoting awareness and proactive prevention, local health professionals will be hosting a Diabetes Symposium, May 5.

Farah Ahmad is a volunteer with the Canadian Diabetes Association and works as a registered nurse and certified diabetes educator at the Wood Buffalo Primary Care Network. She also holds a bachelors and masters in nursing, and is a Certified Pump Trainer.

While the WBPCN assists people with diabetes management, Ahmad says she wanted to bring preventative education to McMurrayites, “preventing diabetes before it becomes an issue.”

Read more: http://www.fortmcmurraytoday.com/ArticleDisplay.aspx?e=3538942

by NationTalk on April 20, 2012726 Views

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BC native chief who supported Northern Gateway appointed to federal board – Calgary Herald

B.C. native chief who supported Northern Gateway appointed to federal board

By Gordon Hoekstra, Postmedia News April 19, 2012

VANCOUVER — The northern B.C. First Nation chief who signed a controversial deal to support Enbridge’s $5.5-billion oil pipeline has been appointed by the federal government to the Prince Rupert Port Authority.

As a director of the board, Gitxsan hereditary chief Elmer Derrick will receive payment, although it is not clear exactly how much.

“It’s a strange appointment. It raises the possibility it’s a quid pro quo (exchange of favours) for supporting the pipeline,” said NDP Skeena-Bulkley Valley MP Nathan Cullen, whose riding includes a large stretch of the Northern Gateway pipeline route.

Read more: http://www.vancouversun.com/news/native+chief+supported+Northern+Gateway+appointed+federal+board/6487936/story.html#ixzz1saXhblm4

by NationTalk on April 20, 2012507 Views

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Tzinquaw centre stage at festival opening – Canada.com

Tzinquaw centre stage at festival opening

BY LEXI BAINAS, CITIZEN APRIL 20, 2012

The 8th annual Aboriginal Film Festival opened Tuesday, April 17 with a stunning tribute to the Tzinquaw dancers.

The history of this legendary troupe, dating to the early 1950s, the fame they gained through an opera and their efforts to preserve tradition formed part of the much-deserved tribute.

On every table at the festive dinner held before the opening cere-monies was a copy of the original Tzinquaw program.

Read more: http://www.canada.com/Tzinquaw+centre+stage+festival+opening/6489978/story.html

by NationTalk on April 20, 2012471 Views

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Regina students honour residential school victims -‎ Regina Leader-Post

Regina students honour residential school victims (with video)

By Jonathan hamelin, Leader-Post April 19, 2012

REGINA — Two hundred and sixty one small, colourful tiles lined the tables of St. Bernadette School on Thursday.

Their designs were different, but many of them shared similar themes. A number of hearts could be seen — some full, others broken. Many crosses were also displayed to mark a gravesite. Also noticeable were the messages of love.

By creating these tiles, the elementary students from Regina were honouring aboriginal children who died in residential schools.

“The tiles themselves represent the life of a child that was lost. The residential school we’re commemorating is Sturgeon Landing, which was in northern Saskatchewan,” said Karen Goodon, Grade 5 teacher. “Sturgeon Landing, which was also known as Guy Hill Residential School, burnt down in 1952, so the children from that school were then relocated.

Read more: http://www.leaderpost.com/Regina+students+honour+residential+school+victims+with+video/6488080/story.html#ixzz1saWXDWRm

by NationTalk on April 20, 2012631 Views

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Special consideration for aboriginals in the courts is a matter of fairness -‎ Globe and Mail

Special consideration for aboriginals in the courts is a matter of fairness

KENT ROACH AND JONATHAN RUDIN
Globe and Mail Update
Published Friday, Apr. 20, 2012

Readers of The Globe and Mail may have been left with the impression, as a result of the Supreme Court of Canada’s recent sentencing decision involving two aboriginal offenders, that all aboriginal offenders are receiving automatic discounts from their sentences. Nothing could be further from the truth.

Coverage of the 157-paragraph Supreme Court case involving Manasie Ipeelee in Ontario and Frank Ladue in B.C. paints a distorted picture. It focuses on the criminal history of one of the offenders – Mr. Ipeelee – and suggests that the court’s decision gave him, and will give other aboriginal offenders, undesired leniency because they are aboriginal.

We would do well to acknowledge the important story of Mr. Ladue, the other offender whose sentence was reviewed by the court. Like Mr. Ipeelee, he had a long criminal record, but he was denied the chance to attend a halfway house and rehabilitation program designed for aboriginal offenders, including offenders who – like him – are residential school survivors. Instead, he was sent to downtown Vancouver, against his express wishes, where he breached the condition that he not become intoxicated.

Read more: http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/opinions/opinion/special-consideration-for-aboriginals-in-the-courts-is-a-matter-of-fairness/article2408189/?utm_medium=Feeds%3A%20RSS%2FAtom&utm_source=Home&utm_content=2408189

by NationTalk on April 20, 2012595 Views

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AFN lays off staff after losing health funding -‎ CBC.ca

AFN lays off staff after losing health funding

Health Canada cuts $15 million from funds given to dozens of aboriginal groups

CBC News Posted: Apr 19, 2012

The Assembly of First Nations says it is forced to lay off staff after Health Canada reduced its funding by 40 per cent, making it the latest aboriginal group to feel the impact of budget cuts at the federal agency.

The AFN said in a statement Thursday the cuts will result in staff layoffs and would impact “its supportive and facilitative role in informing the development of health policies and programs for First Nations.” While AFN is not a direct deliverer of health services, it provides support to other organizations.

Reductions on a regional level or the impact of the cuts to AFN’s other departments are not yet known, the organization said.

Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/story/2012/04/19/pol-afn-health-funding-cut.html

by NationTalk on April 20, 2012910 Views

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Big House gathering celebrates First Nations traditions‎ – Canada.com

Big House gathering celebrates First Nations traditions

BY LISE BROADLEY, COMOX VALLEY ECHO APRIL 20, 2012

Aboriginal students, community members and elders met at the K’ómoks First Nation ceremonial Big House this week to enjoy traditional songs, dances, stories and food and celebrate the different aboriginal traditions alive and well in the Comox Valley.

Elementary and secondary school students gathered for the daylong celebration Tuesday. After welcoming the students and other attendees, local west coast artist Andy Everson spoke to the audience about some of the traditional dances they were about to enjoy.

He explained the significance of the different dances and the process of “claiming” the dances through public performance.

Read more: http://www.canada.com/House+gathering+celebrates+First+Nations+traditions/6489924/story.html

by NationTalk on April 20, 2012761 Views

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New review rules can backfire on Gateway‎ – The Province

New review rules can backfire on Gateway

BY JEFFREY JONES, REUTERS APRIL 20, 2012

A government move to limit a regulatory review of Enbridge Inc.’s Northern Gateway oil pipeline to the West Coast will only add to the company’s own missteps, says a former executive.

Roger Harris, who was vice-president of aboriginal and com-munity partnerships for Enbridge Northern Gateway Pipelines in 2008 and 2009, said the company has been inconsistent in attempts to win over B.C. native groups whose land the pipeline would cross. He said that has helped fuel some of the fierce opposition to the $5.5-billion project.

Many First Nations members say they fear construction and operation of the pipeline will threaten traditional ways of life and leave their territories and coastal waters at risk of oil spills. Some have said court actions are a certainty if it is approved.

Read more: http://www.theprovince.com/life/review+rules+backfire+Gateway/6490701/story.html#ixzz1saUFSHjH

by NationTalk on April 20, 2012464 Views

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First Nations child advocate wins 1st battle with Ottawa on services‎ – CBC.ca

First Nations child advocate wins 1st battle with Ottawa on services

Cindy Blackstock filed human rights complaint over funding of child services on reserves

By Jennifer Clibbon, CBC News Posted: Apr 19, 2012

Cindy Blackstock, a long-time advocate for aboriginal children in Canada, won a major victory on April 18 when the Federal Court ruled that further scrutiny is needed to determine whether Ottawa is discriminating against First Nations children on reserves by underfunding child welfare services.

The court ordered the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal, which dismissed the original discrimination complaint in 2011, to hold a new hearing on the case before a newly constituted panel of adjudicators.

Blackstock, who serves as the executive director of the First Nations and Family Caring Society (FNFCS), filed the complaint against Ottawa with the Canadian Human Rights Commission in February 2007, together with the Assembly of First Nations (AFN). FNFCS and AFN argued that the services on reserve should be on par with those off reserve, which are funded by the province, but, in fact, are much worse.

Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/thunder-bay/story/2012/04/19/f-aboriginal-cindy-blackstock.html

by NationTalk on April 20, 2012617 Views

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Walls crumble, mould infects First Nation school‎ – CBC.ca

Walls crumble, mould infects First Nation school

North Caribou Lake First Nation says students suffer injustice in education funding

Jody Porter CBC News Posted: Apr 19, 2012

Lakota Pans loves school. Math is the 13-year-old’s favourite subject.

“It’s great. I just love getting my education,” Pans said, standing on the hill outside her school in North Caribou Lake First Nation.

Education director Saul Williams said he’d like to do better for eager students like Pans and the 140 other children in his community, located 500 kilometres northwest of Thunder Bay.

“I feel helpless,” he said. “I can’t do nothing.”

Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/thunder-bay/story/2012/04/19/tby-mouldy-school.html

by NationTalk on April 19, 2012598 Views

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The end of the dry reserve‎ – Macleans.ca

The end of the dry reserve?

Aboriginal communities say decades-old bans on alcohol failed to curb abuse. Not everyone agrees.

by Charlie Gillis on Thursday, April 19, 2012

As a young man in the mid-1980s, Glenn Pelletier took elaborate steps before coming home to the Cowessess First Nation, the reserve in southeastern Saskatchewan where he grew up. Pelletier, who was working in Calgary at the time, would pull over his 1972 Mercury Montego before reaching reserve land so he could stash his weekend supply of whisky in his rusted hulk of a car. Cowessess was a dry community—or so Pelletier thought. “I figured if I got stopped there and the cops found my liquor, they’d take it away,” he says. “So I’d put it under the seat, in the trunk, in a suitcase. Wherever.”

Years later, Pelletier learned the truth: Cowessess was not officially dry in those days, and never had been. All that time, his elders had hoodwinked him and his friends, throwing around the phrase “dry reserve” so often the youngsters assumed the band had passed a bylaw imposing prohibition. It was a masterpiece of brainwashing—and testimony to the power of an idea. At the time, the “dry” movement was sweeping Aboriginal communities across Canada, where leaders saw it as a means of curbing the catastrophic effect of alcohol abuse on their populations. Why wouldn’t Cowessess do the same?

Read more: http://www2.macleans.ca/2012/04/19/the-end-of-the-dry-reserve/

by NationTalk on April 19, 2012492 Views

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Reserve kids underfunded, court decides‎ – Montreal Gazette

Reserve kids underfunded, court decides

BY TERESA SMITH AND GEMMA KARSTENS-SMITH, POSTMEDIA NEWS APRIL 19, 2012

A Federal Court judge has opened the door for the federal government to potentially be held legally responsible – and culpable of discrimination – because First Nations residents’ children receive less funding per capita for social services than young Canadians living off reserves.

Justice Anne Mactavish issued a ruling Wednesday that found the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal’s chair erred when she dismissed a 2007 case from the First Nations Child and Family Caring Society of Canada and the Assembly of First Nations.

As a result, she granted the three applications for judicial review of the decision.

Read more: http://www.montrealgazette.com/life/Reserve+kids+underfunded+court+decides/6482101/story.html#ixzz1sVBU3YHb

by NationTalk on April 19, 2012472 Views

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Grassy Narrows First Nation believes housing is cornerstone to …- ‎ Lake of the Woods Enterprise

Grassy Narrows First Nation believes housing is cornerstone to independence

Band borrows against future income to finance new homes
By Jon Thompson

Some of the 32 brand new homes line the road leading into the community, not bought with housing money but with the proceeds of gambling.

The chief and council are in the second year of a five-year housing plan that was the cornerstone of their recent re-election platform. On a 10-year plan, the band borrowed against global funding and “Casino Rama” income, re-calibrated as the 1.6 per cent of provincial lottery monies distributed to First Nations. The $200,000 Grassy Narrows receives annually, plus $60,000 for renovations, its leadership argues, couldn’t possibly meet the demand in a community of 900 people living in 179 homes, many of which are or should be condemned.

Read more: http://www.lotwenterprise.com/ArticleDisplay.aspx?e=3538421

by NationTalk on April 19, 2012700 Views

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First Nations Child Funding Scores Court Victory – Postmedia News

First Nations child funding scores court victory

Federal judge orders new rights panel hear case

BY GEMMA KARSTENS-SMITH AND TERESA SMITH, POSTMEDIA NEWS APRIL 19, 2012

First Nations groups are hailing a Federal Court judgment as the first step toward equality for aboriginal children on reserves.

Justice Anne Mactavish issued a ruling Wednesday that found the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal’s chairwoman erred when she dismissed a 2007 case from the First Nations Child and Family Caring Society of Canada and the Assembly of First Nations.

Mactavish set aside the tribunal’s original 2011 decision and granted three applications for judicial review. She ordered that a “differently constituted panel” hear the case.

Read more: http://www.ottawacitizen.com/life/First+Nations+child+funding+scores+court+victory/6482407/story.html#ixzz1sV6StRCT

by NationTalk on April 19, 2012586 Views

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First Nation Engineering Company Launches in Prince Rupert – Vancouver Sun

First nation engineering company launches in Prince Rupert

Embark Engineering partners with Burnaby firm to create job opportunities

BY DARAH HANSEN, VANCOUVER SUN APRIL 19, 2012

A remote northern first nation stepped into uncharted territory Wednesday with the creation of the province’s first aboriginal-owned engineering firm.

The newly minted Embark Engineering is majority owned by the Lax Kw’alaams First Nation located in Port Simpson, 35 kilometres north of Prince Rupert, in partnership with the Burnaby-based engineering firm, Kerr Wood Leidal Associates Ltd.

The company’s launch is expected to add to the community’s growing business presence in the Northwest and offer long-term, and lucrative, career opportunities for its estimated 3,300 members.

Read more: http://www.vancouversun.com/First+nation+engineering+company+launches+Prince+Rupert/6483708/story.html#ixzz1sV4t95PQ

by NationTalk on April 19, 2012819 Views

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Subsidized-Housing Ownership Switching from B.C. to M’akola – Times Colonist

Subsidized-housing ownership switching from B.C. to M’akola

BY JUDITH LAVOIE, TIMES COLONIST APRIL 19, 2012

The provincial government has handed ownership of 75 subsidized rental homes on Vancouver Island to M’akola Housing Society, a non-profit group that manages affordable housing for First Nations people living off reserve.

The transfer is the first phase of a provincial program to shift responsibility for more than 500 properties in 113 rural communities to aboriginal non-profit housing groups.

Although ownership has switched to M’akola, the change will make little difference to First Nations families already living in the homes, said Kevin Albers, M’akola CEO.

Read more: http://www.timescolonist.com/business/Subsidized+housing+ownership+switching+from+akola/6483926/story.html#ixzz1sV4OI0dG

by NationTalk on April 19, 2012475 Views

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First Nations want say in health regions – CBC News

First Nations want say in health regions

CBC News Posted: Apr 18, 2012

Northern First Nations leaders in Manitoba want a seat on the board of the newly-merged health authorities.

And they say the savings — estimated by the government at $10 million over three years — from merging regional health authorities should be re-invested in northern health care.

The province is reducing the number of regional health authorities from 11 to five. (Office of Rural and Northern Health)
The province is trying to rein in spending by reducing the number of regional health authorities from 11 to five, which Finance Minister Stan Struthers said will eliminate about 35 executive positions.

Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/manitoba/story/2012/04/18/mb-health-authorities-first-nations-manitoba.html

by NationTalk on April 18, 2012495 Views

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Parks Canada, Tseshaht partner in Broken Islands‎ – Victoria Times Colonist

Parks Canada, Tseshaht partner in Broken Islands

First Nation hopes agreement will provide tourism opportunities

BY JUDITH LAVOIE, TIMES COLONIST APRIL 18, 2012

Members of the Tseshaht First Nation are celebrating an agreement with Parks Canada to co-operate on management of the Broken Group Islands, identified in traditional stories as the birthplace of the band.

“It is very important. It has a lot of meaning,” said Cindy Stern, CEO of the Tseshaht.

A memorandum of agreement on planning and managing the islands, off the west coast of Vancouver Island, will be signed Thursday in Port Alberni.

Read more: http://www.timescolonist.com/travel/Parks+Canada+Tseshaht+partner+Broken+Islands/6477580/story.html

by NationTalk on April 18, 2012423 Views

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Connecting students with potential mentors‎ – Regina Leader-Post

Connecting students with potential mentors

BY KERRY BENJOE, LEADER-POST APRIL 18, 2012

Aboriginal post-secondary students will have the chance to meet with potential mentors and employers today at a special event organized by the Regina Aboriginal Professional Association (RAPA).

Dominga Robinson, RAPA board member, said it’s the kickoff of a program the organization is developing.

She said reaching out to aboriginal youth is one of RAPA’s objectives.

Students from First Nations University of Canada, Saskatchewan Indian Institute of Technologies (SIIT), SIAST and Gabriel Dumont Institute will have a chance to meet employers and mentors from RAPA’s corporate members and other corporate sponsors like Potash Corporation of Saskatchewan, Information Services Corporation, Farm Credit Canada, SaskTel and others.

Read more: http://www.leaderpost.com/life/Connecting+students+with+potential+mentors/6476298/story.html#ixzz1sP6ZYp8C

by NationTalk on April 18, 2012475 Views

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Activist says aboriginal rights still need charter protection -‎ StarPhoenix

Activist says aboriginal rights still need charter protection

By Betty Ann Adam, The StarPhoenix April 18, 2012

Canada’s Charter of Rights and Freedoms has benefited aboriginal people, activist Elijah Harper said, but he hopes for a day when they don’t need to rely on its protection.

“I look forward to a day when (charter protection of aboriginal rights) will be far less important than they are today because the advantage gap between aboriginal and non-aboriginals would have been reduced by resource sharing and a treaty-based partnership,” he said.

Harper said he imagines “the relationship between (them) will have matured and there would not be conflict between our values that requires a shield.”

Read more: http://www.thestarphoenix.com/news/Activist+says+aboriginal+rights+still+need+charter+protection/6476401/story.html#ixzz1sP6C4AzK

by NationTalk on April 18, 2012493 Views

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Federal Court sides with native groups in discrimination case‎ – Montreal Gazette

Federal Court sides with native groups in discrimination case

By Teresa Smith and Gemma Karstens-Smith, Postmedia News April 18, 2012

OTTAWA — A Federal Court judge has opened the door for the federal government to potentially be found culpable of discrimination because First Nations residents and children receive less funding per capita for social services than Canadians living off-reserve.

Justice Anne McTavish issued a ruling Wednesday that found the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal’s chair erred when she dismissed a 2007 case from the First Nations Child and Family Caring Society of Canada and the Assembly of First Nations.

As a result, she granted the three applications for judicial review of the decision.

The First Nations groups allege the federal government discriminates against aboriginal children by consistently underfunding child-welfare services on reserves, leading, they contend, to poverty, poor housing, substance abuse and a vast over-representation of aboriginal children in state care.

Read more: http://www.canada.com/Federal+Court+sides+with+native+groups+discrimination+case/6478242/story.html#ixzz1sP4XwjLq

by NationTalk on April 18, 2012493 Views

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More PEI aboriginal students graduating than national average‎ – CBC.ca

More P.E.I. aboriginal students graduating than national average

About 90% of First Nations students graduate high school on P.E.I.

CBC News Posted: Apr 18, 2012

The percentage of First Nations students graduating high school on P.E.I. is much higher than the national average, according to island education officials.

The national Aboriginal Affairs Working Group has set improving high school graduation rates as one of its priorities. Only 77 per cent of First Nations students living off-reserve in Canada got a diploma in 2010, according to Statistics Canada. That’s compared to a graduation rate of around 90 per cent of Island First Nation students.

Allan Gillis, education director with the Mi’kmaq Confederacy of P.E.I., said he thinks one of the reasons for the Island’s higher than average aboriginal graduation rate is many parents today are more involved — because many are children of residential school survivors.

Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/prince-edward-island/story/2012/04/17/pei-aboriginal-high-school-grads-584.html

by NationTalk on April 18, 2012458 Views

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First Nations seek healing by reconnecting to the land – CBC

First Nations seek healing by reconnecting to the land

Outdoor activities seen as key to ending addiction crisis

By Jody Porter, CBC News Posted: Apr 17, 2012

Mining is on the minds of many people hoping to spark the economies of northern Ontario First Nations, but some report up to 80 per cent of their population is hooked on prescription painkillers, and they’re looking to the land to bring healing before it provides riches.

“First Nations people, when we’re faced with a crisis, we need to look inward to see where the solution comes from,” said Nishnawbe Aski Nation Grand Chief Stan Beardy. “We need to reconnect our young people to the land.”

Beardy brought the federal Liberal aboriginal affairs critic, as well as reporters, on a tour of a few of the isolated First Nations he represents with the hope of shining a light on the problems with prescription drug abuse — and the potential solutions.

Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/thunder-bay/story/2012/04/17/tby-first-nations-healing.html

by NationTalk on April 18, 2012487 Views

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Mother recalls horror at teen suicide inquest – Winnipeg Free Press

Mother recalls horror at teen suicide inquest

By: Gabrielle Giroday
Posted: 04/17/2012

A mother told Monday how her 15-year-old daughter, who hanged herself while in custody at the Manitoba Youth Centre, had been sexually abused as a child and had previously tried to kill herself.

The testimony came during the first day of an inquest into the deaths of two teenaged girls who committed suicide separately while in the Winnipeg jail in 2010. The deaths caused public scrutiny of mental-health services available at the MYC, and resulted in changes to door hinges in the jail and the removal of sheets and pillowcases from some of the cottages that house girls.

Under the province’s Child and Family Services Act and the federal Youth Criminal Justice Act, the Free Press can’t publish details such as the names of the girls.

Read more: http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/local/mother-recalls-horror-at-teen-suicide-inquest-147708825.html

by NationTalk on April 18, 2012664 Views

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Doctor wants action on First Nation drug crisis – CBC

Doctor wants action on First Nation drug crisis

Some First Nations say 80 per cent of their population is hooked on prescription painkillers

CBC News Posted: Apr 16, 2012

Prescription drug abuse in northern First Nations is a health emergency that chiefs and doctors say Health Canada refuses to take seriously.

Doctor Claudette Chase, the co-medical director with the Sioux Lookout First Nation Health Authority, said Health Canada is developing a policy for treating addicts, but she wishes that policy was in place “yesterday.”

“It would be nice to see Health Canada jump in with both feet and say ‘Oh my God this is an epidemic, how are we going to fight it,’” Chase said.

Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/thunder-bay/story/2012/04/16/tby-cat-lake-addictions-help.html

by NationTalk on April 18, 2012577 Views

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‘Sucking up to Canada’ : Chief is getting things done — and that’s getting … – Winnipeg Free Press

‘Sucking up to Canada’ : Chief is getting things done — and that’s getting him some critics

By: Bill Redekop

BIRDTAIL SIOUX FIRST NATION — “Green Roof” First Nation might be more apropos for this reserve, in the aboriginal tradition of naming people and places after physical traits.

Driving around the reserve, there’s one shiny green tin roof after another — 54 new roofs in total.

It’s one of the reasons Chief Ken Chalmers gets called “Indian agent” by some chiefs, and why he’s been accused, as he put it, of “sucking up to Canada.”

To get the roofs, Chalmers did something that may be unique in Canada. He accessed Canada’s Economic Action Plan funding for a reserve, Birdtail Sioux First Nation. The federal government agreed to his plan to replace the roofs, windows and doors of 54 reserve homes. But government would only reimburse the First Nation. Birdtail Sioux had to pay the $2.5 million cost up front.

Read more: http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/breakingnews/sucking-up-to-canada-chief-is-getting-things-done—-and-thats-getting-him-some-critics-147708195.html

by NationTalk on April 17, 2012469 Views

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Peacekeeping priority for aboriginal protests – Hamilton Spectator

Peacekeeping priority for aboriginal protests

Danielle Wong Tue Apr 17 2012

The Hamilton Police Services Board has approved a draft policy for officers at aboriginal occupations and protests that prioritizes peacekeeping.

Last month, the Ministry of Community Safety and Correctional Services sent a notice to police chiefs across the province with policing guidelines for demonstrations involving aboriginal people.

The new protocol was created in response to recommendations made in the Ipperwash Inquiry, which was called by the province after native activist Dudley George was fatally shot during a First Nations protest at Ipperwash Provincial Park in 1995.

Read more: http://www.thespec.com/news/local/article/706650–peacekeeping-priority-for-aboriginal-protests

by NationTalk on April 17, 2012515 Views

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Residential school probe key to new rapport, says national chief Atleo – Victoria Times Colonist

Residential school probe key to new rapport, says national chief Atleo

By Judith Lavoie, timescolonist.com April 16, 2012

It’s time to press the reset button on the relationship between aboriginal and non-aboriginal Canadians, and the Truth and Reconciliation Commission is setting the stage for that change, says Assembly of First Nations National Chief Shawn Atleo.

In Victoria, hundreds of non-aboriginal people packed into rooms at Victoria Conference Centre late last week and listened to stories of horrific abuse at residential schools and brutally honest accounts of intergenerational problems caused by the disruption to culture and families.

Slowly, the realization is dawning that a more respectful relationship is beneficial to everyone, Atleo told an audience of high school students at an education forum organized by the commission.

Read more: http://www.timescolonist.com/Residential+school+probe+rapport+says+national+chief+Atleo/6469161/story.html#ixzz1sGbMpXzK

by NationTalk on April 17, 2012465 Views

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