S Mainstream Aboriginal Related News

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Riding horses helps youths develop skills – Fort Frances Times

Riding horses helps youths develop skills

Wednesday, 25 January 2012
By Heather Latter, Staff writer

Despite the frosty temperatures Saturday, more than 35 youths from Seine River First Nation boarded a bus and headed to Running Horse Ranch, located in Miscampbell Township just west of Fort Frances, for the opportunity to ride horses and develop new skills.

The outing was part of a initiative called “GEN7” offered through Motivate Canada, a Canadian charitable organization that specializes in improving the lives of young people.

“Equine therapy hits home for a lot of our people because of the connection to horses. They are gentle and understanding, and we use that to teach leadership,” noted Kent Brown, a “messenger” of the GEN7 program, which aims to encourage aboriginal youth to live an active and healthy lifestyle through sport, physical activity, and other means.

Read more: http://fftimes.com/node/248754

by NationTalk on January 26, 2012664 Views

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Sask. First Nation group aims for self-governance – CTV.ca

Sask. First Nation group aims for self-governance

Updated: Thu Jan. 26 2012
The Canadian Press

SASKATOON — A Saskatchewan First Nation is one step closer to establishing its own government.

Chief Darcy Bear of the Whitecap Dakota First Nation has signed an agreement with Ottawa to negotiate a framework for self-governance.

Bear says it follows up on the First Nation Land Management Act a few years ago, which allowed them to self-govern their own lands and resulted in the economic turnaround at Whitecap.

Read more: http://edmonton.ctv.ca/servlet/an/local/CTVNews/20120126/whitecap-dakota-first-nation-120126/20120126/?hub=EdmontonHome

by NationTalk on January 26, 2012558 Views

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Northern Gateway needs aboriginal consent: chief – Financial Post

Northern Gateway needs aboriginal consent: chief

Reuters Jan 26, 2012
By David Ljunggren

OTTAWA — Enbridge Inc’s controversial plan to build a pipeline to the Pacific Coast from oil-rich Alberta requires the consent of aboriginal bands, some of whom staunchly oppose the project, Canada’s top native leader said on Wednesday.

The contention underlines the difficulties facing Enbridge as it tries to push through the $5.5-billion Northern Gateway project, which would cross land belonging to many Indian bands, or first nations, so the oil sands-derived crude could be shipped to Asia and California.

Shawn Atleo, national chief of the Assembly of First Nations, said bands had “the right to free, prior and informed consent” over projects affecting their territory.

Read more: http://business.financialpost.com/2012/01/26/northern-gateway-needs-aboriginal-consent-chief/?__lsa=88489bb5

by NationTalk on January 26, 2012634 Views

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Legal setback for Ontario aboriginals taken from their families during the … – Toronto Star

Legal setback for Ontario aboriginals taken from their families during the “Sixties Scoop”

Published On Wed Jan 25 2012

The federal government has won its appeal in Divisional Court against a class-action lawsuit on behalf of 16,000 aboriginal children taken from reserves in Ontario in what’s known as the “Sixties Scoop.”

The decision is seen as a major setback for aboriginal plaintiffs, now adults, who allege Ottawa stripped them of their cultural identity by sending them off as children to non-aboriginal homes. Many told stories of abuse, alienation and isolation in foster and adoptive homes in Canada and the U.S.

“Canada’s strategy is to get us out of the way,” lead plaintiff Marcia Brown, 48, said Wednesday from Beaverhouse First Nation in northeastern Ontario. “It’s an injustice. What I truly feel is that this isn’t a fair system for First Nations’ people. ”

Read more: http://www.thestar.com/news/article/1121500–legal-setback-for-ontario-aboriginals-taken-from-their-families-during-the-sixties-scoop?bn=1

by NationTalk on January 26, 2012417 Views

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Aboriginal community forges template for change – CBC.ca

Aboriginal community forges template for change

‘We have a home,’ resident says

CBC News Posted: Jan 25, 2012

Like many aboriginal communities, living conditions are a concern in Oujé-Bougoumou in northern Quebec, but over the years there have been major improvements, changing both attitudes and lives.

Thomas Bosum, 30, said he remembers a not so distant time in the 1990s when there were only shacks, tents and no running water or power.

Today some 800 people live in Oujé-Bougoumou, in the middle of the province halfway between Quebec City and James Bay.

“Before we used to live in shacks along the highway,” Bosum told CBC News.

Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/story/2012/01/25/housing-aboriginal.html

by NationTalk on January 26, 2012448 Views

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Paul Martin to Harper: Stop studying age-old native problems, go to a reserve – Globe and Mail

Paul Martin to Harper: Stop studying age-old native problems, go to a reserve

HEATHER SCOFFIELD
Ottawa— The Canadian Press
Published Wednesday, Jan. 25, 2012

Paul Martin does nothing to mask his frustration on the other end of a telephone line.

The former prime minister and architect of the scuttled Kelowna Accord tried to find something to salvage in the historic talks between First Nations chiefs and Prime Minister Stephen Harper. Instead, what he saw was the federal government wasting more time and sending the chiefs home empty handed.

“The government has nothing concrete to say,” Mr. Martin told The Canadian Press. “They wasted six years.”

The joint statement between Mr. Harper and the chiefs released Tuesday committed to a task force on economic development and a working group on the structure of government financing of First Nations.

Read more: http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/politics/paul-martin-to-harper-stop-studying-age-old-native-problems-go-to-a-reserve/article2314095/?from=sec368

by NationTalk on January 25, 2012614 Views

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PM talking about incremental change – Vancouver Sun

PM talking about incremental change

No chance that Stephen Harper would agree to anything like the Liberals’ Kelowna Accord

By Barbara Yaffe, Vancouver Sun January 25, 2012

Stephen Harper was never going to agree to a deal for aboriginals like the cashrich Kelowna Accord, negotiated by Paul Martin’s Liberals in 2005.

It featured more than $5 billion for aboriginal health care, education, housing and clean water. It was lauded by chiefs, and promptly cancelled by the Conservatives when they took power in 2006.

Six years later, and with Ottawa cutting its spending to balance the federal budget, the Harper regime is talking only about incremental and pragmatic changes, ones that would give Canada’s aboriginals the tools to help themselves.

Read more: http://www.vancouversun.com/business/talking+about+incremental+change/6047834/story.html#ixzz1kUSPcUp0

by NationTalk on January 25, 2012441 Views

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RCMP program trains Aboriginal pre-cadets – Fort McMurray Today

RCMP program trains Aboriginal pre-cadets

By Amanda Richardson

As a part of the RCMP’s mandate to connect with key demographics and promote the organization in a positive way, the RCMP is holding an Aboriginal Pre-Cadet Training Program this summer.

“The Aboriginal Pre-Cadet Training Program offers Aboriginals from Canada, aged 19 to 29, the opportunity to experience some daily police work within the RCMP,” said Const. Christina Wilkins, Wood Buffalo RCMP’s media relations officer. “It’s a 17-week program and provides these candidates with hands-on experience in our training program and also the opportunity to work in some of the communities we police.”

Read more: http://www.fortmcmurraytoday.com/ArticleDisplay.aspx?e=3447812

by NationTalk on January 25, 2012810 Views

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Sewage spill threatens First Nation’s health – CBC

Sewage spill threatens First Nation’s health

Overflowing sewage plant, over-capacity diesel generator hamper growth in Kasabonika Lake First Nation

Jody Porter CBC News Posted: Jan 25, 2012

First Nations chiefs told the Prime Minister Tuesday their lives are constricted by “layer upon layer of bureaucracy.” In Kasabonika Lake First Nation, an overflowing sewage plant and limited electrical capacity are examples of that.

The First Nation, located 800 kilometres north of Thunder Bay in northwestern Ontario, estimates it’s missing out on more than $9 million worth of jobs and economic opportunities as Aboriginal Affairs delays funding for its sewage plant and diesel generator.

Waste water began spilling into the lake from the community’s sewage plant more than a decade ago. A series of letters provided to CBC by the First Nation show a cycle of Aboriginal Affairs funding studies to fix the problem. It then told the First Nation there is no money to pay for the fix.

Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/thunder-bay/story/2012/01/25/tby-kasabonika-sewage-woes.html

by NationTalk on January 25, 2012405 Views

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Focus first nations dialogue on self-sufficiency‎ – Globe and Mail

Focus first nations dialogue on self-sufficiency

JEFFREY SIMPSON
From Wednesday’s Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, Jan. 25, 2012

History does repeat itself, it would appear.

Pierre Trudeau had his constitutional conferences that involved aboriginal leaders. Brian Mulroney had his too, plus a big session in British Columbia to launch the B.C. Treaty Commission process, which has been a discouraging flop.

Jean Chrétien often went on about how splendidly he got along with the chiefs, having been Indian Affairs minister early in his career. Paul Martin had his Kelowna Accord. Stephen Harper had his reconciliation/apology statement over residential schools and, Tuesday, a day-long session with the chiefs.

Along the way, the national leadership of the Assembly of First Nations has obviously changed, as have the local chiefs. But the dialogue seldom changes, on either side of the table. Sonorous clichés mix with history lessons about “settlers” and their perfidy, lessons are repeated about the “honour of the Crown” and treaties that are/were not respected. Discreet references are offered about the discouraging economic and social statistics of aboriginal people, complaints are aired about insufficient public funding, occasional threats are made about the potential for violence and then things continue pretty much as before, out there in the real world, far removed from the conferences with their ceremonies and solemnities.

Read more: http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/opinions/jeffrey-simpson/focus-first-nations-dialogue-on-self-sufficiency/article2313607/

by NationTalk on January 25, 2012487 Views

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First Nations have right to resources, Atleo says‎ – CBC.ca

First Nations have right to resources, Atleo says

Not mere stakeholders in development, national chief says

By Laura Payton, CBC News Posted: Jan 25, 2012

First Nations are more than just stakeholders and have rights to resource development that must be recognized, Shawn Atleo said Wednesday.

The national chief of the Assembly of First Nations says the chiefs who met with Prime Minister Stephen Harper Tuesday told him they have real rights through their treaties when it comes to pipeline and mining projects.

“Right now, government feels that through their actions and through their regulatory processes and licences that First Nations are simply stakeholders,” Atleo said.

Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/ottawa/story/2012/01/25/pol-first-nations-atleo.html

by NationTalk on January 25, 2012500 Views

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Aboriginal group wants preferential hiring if Gateway pipeline approved – Edmonton Journal

Aboriginal group wants preferential hiring if Gateway pipeline approved

By Trish Audette, edmontonjournal.com January 24, 2012

EDMONTON – The lead community-industry liaison for the Enoch Cree First Nation finds herself in a bit of a “bind” when it comes to the controversial Enbridge Northern Gateway pipeline proposal.

“We were known as the caretakers of the land … if you’re going to take something from the land, give something back,” Leigh Ann Ward said Tuesday. “There is a need for (the pipeline), but what are the environmental impacts?”

At the same time, Ward is interested in the economic benefits of the proposed pipeline, which would carry Alberta bitumen to Asia-bound tankers off the West Coast.

Read more: http://www.edmontonjournal.com/news/Aboriginal+group+wants+preferential+hiring+Gateway+pipeline+approved/6043405/story.html#ixzz1kUObZLcS

by NationTalk on January 25, 2012423 Views

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Manitoba reserve illustrates First Nations challenges – CTV

Manitoba reserve illustrates First Nations challenges

CTVNews.ca Staff
Date: Mon. Jan. 23 2012

Sitting amidst the dense thicket of Manitoba’s boreal forest, the Wasagamack reserve illustrates some of the hardships faced by First Nations people across Canada.

About 1,800 Ojibway-Cree people live on the reserve, a place where running water is a luxury and overcrowded homes are the norm.

But, according to First Nations chiefs, Wasagamack is just a microcosm of the challenges aboriginal communities across Canada share.

Read more: http://www.ctv.ca/CTVNews/Canada/20120123/wasagamack-reserve-manitoba-120123/#ixzz1kUOCGpic

by NationTalk on January 25, 2012600 Views

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Mouldy homes on First Nations reserves a national crisis, UVic study says – Victoria Times-Colonist

Mouldy homes on First Nations reserves a national crisis, UVic study says

By Judith Lavoie, timescolonist.com January 24, 2012

Almost half the homes on First Nations reserves in Canada are mouldy and the high levels of toxins are making people sick, University of Victoria researchers say.

The problem amounts to a national crisis, but, despite a patchwork of programs, little has been done to address underlying problems for two decades, their study concludes.

Conditions on many reserves are deplorable and dangerous, UVic medical anthropologist PeterStephenson, who led the study said in an interview Tuesday. “For small children, it’s disgraceful,” he said. “We haven’t seen any action on this for 15 to 20 years and it’s long overdue.”

Read more: http://www.timescolonist.com/business/Mouldy+homes+First+Nations+reserves+national+crisis+UVic+study+says/6046526/story.html#ixzz1kUNnRZxe

by NationTalk on January 25, 2012423 Views

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‘New day’ for Aboriginal relations, Harper says – Calgary Herald

‘New day’ for Aboriginal relations, Harper says

By Teresa Smith and Bradley Bouzane, Postmedia News January 24, 2012

OTTAWA — Prime Minister Stephen Harper told a gathering of First Nations chiefs Tuesday that the time is perfect to “reset the relationship” between government and the aboriginal community in Canada, moving forward with a vision to fully include them in the country’s economy.

Harper told the gathering in Ottawa — which included Assembly of First Nations National Chief Shawn Atleo, chiefs from across the country, Gov. Gen. David Johnston and other dignitaries — that it is important to learn from the past and focus on the future.

Read more: http://www.canada.com/news/politics/Aboriginal+relations+Harper+says/6043504/story.html#ixzz1kUN8uvPh

by NationTalk on January 25, 2012427 Views

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After ‘aboriginal uprising’ warning, Stephen Harper says time has come to … – National Post

After ‘aboriginal uprising’ warning, Stephen Harper says time has come to ‘reset the relationship’

Postmedia News Jan 24, 2012
By Teresa Smith and Bradley Bouzane

OTTAWA — Prime Minister Stephen Harper told a gathering of First Nations chiefs Tuesday that while the Indian Act will not be scrapped, it may be modernized to help build a healthier relationship between the government and Canada’s aboriginal community.

Harper told those at the summit in Ottawa — such as Assembly of First Nations National Chief Shawn Atleo, chiefs from across the country, Gov. Gen. David Johnston and other dignitaries — that co-operation on numerous levels is necessary to fully bring Canada’s First Nations into the country’s economy.

Read more: http://news.nationalpost.com/2012/01/24/stephen-harper-pledges-to-reset-the-relationship-after-aboriginal-uprising-warning/

by NationTalk on January 24, 2012517 Views

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‘We all need to move forward’ – Macleans.ca

‘We all need to move forward’

by Aaron Wherry on Tuesday, January 24, 2012

The prepared text of the Prime Minister’s remarks at today’s summit.

Au-gee-na-pee. Bienvenue, Mesdames et messieurs. Welcome, Ladies and Gentlemen.

It is indeed a pleasure to welcome you … on the traditional territory of the Algonquin … to this historic Crown-First Nations Gathering. And it is especially appropriate to do so in this building. Un édifice dont le nom honore la mémoire du Premier ministre John George Diefenbaker, l’instigateur des relations de l’ère moderne entre la Couronne et les Premières Nations. A building whose name honours the memory of a prime minister who cared deeply about the things we are gathered here to talk about: respect, rights and opportunity for First Nations Canadians.

John George Diefenbaker was, in many ways, the initiator of the modern era of Crown – First Nations relations. It was he who named the first First Nations member to the Parliament of Canada, Senator James Gladstone in 1958. And, of course, it was he who, two years later, extended to aboriginal Canadians living on reserves the right to vote in national elections. In addressing that long-standing and fundamental injustice, he was a man ahead of his time and in many ways, an apt inspiration for today’s proceedings.

Read more: http://www2.macleans.ca/2012/01/24/we-all-need-to-move-forward/

by NationTalk on January 24, 2012658 Views

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Preventing obesity in aboriginal kids needs to start with parental support: study – Winnipeg Free Press

Preventing obesity in aboriginal kids needs to start with parental support: study

By: The Canadian Press
Posted: 01/24/2012

OTTAWA – Strategies to prevent obesity among aboriginal children must begin with an understanding of the unique social and historical factors that shape their broader community, a study suggests.

“There needs to be a focus on improving the risk factors such as income and education,” said Noreen Willows, a co-author of the study published in the February issue of the journal Applied Physiology, Nutrition and Metabolism.

“Additionally, there needs to be a focus on embracing the cultural practices in terms of language and pride in the aboriginal culture to influence health behaviours and outcomes,” Willows said in a release Tuesday.

Read more: http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/arts-and-life/life/health/preventing-obesity-in-aboriginal-kids-needs-to-start-with-parental-support-study–137971703.html

by NationTalk on January 24, 2012596 Views

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Native status focus of lawsuit – TheChronicleHerald.ca

Native status focus of lawsuit

January 24, 2012

Laws erected “societal wall’ between man and his culture

A Truro man is at the centre of a class action over the denial of First Nations status based on what he alleges is wilful discrimination.

Christopher Robson’s statement of claim, filed Thursday in Nova Scotia Supreme Court in Halifax, lists the federal departments of Indian and Northern Affairs (now known as Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development), National Revenue and Health as defendants, as well as the provincial Finance Department and the former provincial Fisheries and Agriculture Department.

Read more: http://thechronicleherald.ca/novascotia/55013-native-status-focus-lawsuit

by NationTalk on January 24, 2012754 Views

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Harper rules out total repeal of Indian Act, vows ‘aggressive’ action – Globe and Mail

Harper rules out total repeal of Indian Act, vows ‘aggressive’ action

BILL CURRY AND GLORIA GALLOWAY
OTTAWA— Globe and Mail Update
Published Tuesday, Jan. 24, 2012

Prime Minister Stephen Harper says “aggressive” action is needed to improve the living standards and quality of life of Canada’s first nations, but is ruling out a full repeal of the 1876 Indian Act that continues to govern day-to-day life on reserves.

Taking the podium following an opening ceremony of drums, song and prayers at a special one-day Crown-First Nations gathering in Ottawa, the Prime Minister’s speech focused a great deal on the history of the complex relationship between the two sides.

Read more: http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/politics/harper-rules-out-total-repeal-of-indian-act-vows-aggressive-action/article2312916/

by NationTalk on January 24, 2012769 Views

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Is Harper approach to native issues more than just a passing phase? – Globe and Mail

Is Harper approach to native issues more than just a passing phase?

JOHN IBBITSON
Globe and Mail Update
Published Tuesday, Jan. 24, 2012

The third phase of Stephen Harper’s approach to aboriginal issues collides with the angry, conflicting, politically charged demands of Canada’s first nations leadership Tuesday. Not only is there no certainty of success, no one is exactly sure what success would look like.

The meeting itself is an important station in the progress of this Prime Minister. Mr. Harper came to power in 2006 determined to scupper the Kelowna Accord, Paul Martin’s multibillion-dollar agreement to improve health, education and quality of life for Indian and other aboriginal people.

Read more: http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/politics/john-ibbitson/is-harper-approach-to-native-issues-more-than-just-a-passing-phase/article2312689/?utm_medium=Feeds%3A%20RSS%2FAtom&utm_source=Politics&utm_content=2312689

by NationTalk on January 24, 2012529 Views

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Special Seats for Native MPs? – Winnipeg Free Press

Special seats for native MPs?

Proposal to be raised during summit with PM in Ottawa

By: Mia Rabson
Posted: 01/24/2012

OTTAWA — Canada’s chiefs want in.

One of the many issues that will be raised for discussion today at the Crown-First Nations gathering in Ottawa will be a Manitoba-born proposal to set aside 10 seats in the House of Commons for aboriginal-elected MPs.

“We need our own voice in the House of Commons,” said Ron Evans, the Norway House chief and former grand chief of the Assembly of Manitoba Chiefs.

Evans raised the idea Monday as about 400 chiefs from across Canada met in Ottawa ahead of today’s summit with Prime Minister Stephen Harper.

Read more: http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/local/special-seats-for-native-mps-137946203.html

by NationTalk on January 24, 2012703 Views

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Stephen Harper Meets Privately with First Nations Leaders Before Summit – The Toronto Star

Stephen Harper meets privately with First Nations leaders before summit

Published On Tue Jan 24 2012
Bruce Campion-Smith
Ottawa Bureau Chief

OTTAWA—Prime Minister Stephen Harper huddled with First Nations leaders on the eve of the landmark summit to hear first-hand about the challenges facing aboriginal peoples nationwide.

In the nearly two-hour discussion, Harper reassured 33 chiefs that he’s prepared to have ongoing meetings as they strive to find solutions to problems such as chronic poverty.

“He did tell us that on many issues that we are prepared to sit further, that this was not the end of our discussions with him,” said Charles Weasel Head, chief of the Blood Tribe in Alberta and Grand Chief for Treaty 7.

Read more: http://www.thestar.com/article/1119942–stephen-harper-meets-privately-with-first-nations-leaders-before-summit

by NationTalk on January 24, 2012775 Views

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Actor Gives Voice to Sask. Figure – The StarPhoenix

Actor gives voice to Sask. figure

The life of Almighty Voice relived

By Stephanie McKay, The StarPhoenix January 24, 2012

More than 115 years ago, Almighty Voice was arrested for allegedly killing a cow. A century later, strong connections still exist to the Saskatchewan story, which eventually found the young aboriginal man escape from jail, shoot an RCMP officer and die in an exchange of gunfire.

Saskatchewan-born actress PJ Prudat stars in a remounting of the 1991 play Almighty Voice and His Wife, coming to Saskatoon for three shows. Prudat said it’s wonderful to be able to tell the story where it actually happened.

“It’s definitely a homecoming in that way. Telling the story where it originated and honouring the people from that area is hugely important,” she said in an interview from Toronto.

Read more: http://www.thestarphoenix.com/entertainment/Actor+gives+voice+Sask+figure/6040740/story.html#ixzz1kOsV6H4z

by NationTalk on January 24, 2012776 Views

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Update Indian Act but don’t throw it out, Harper says – CBC News

Update Indian Act but don’t throw it out, Harper says

First Nations national chief calls act ‘painful obstacle’

By Laura Payton, CBC News Posted: Jan 24, 2012

The government will modernize the Indian Act, which is too entrenched to get rid of entirely, Prime Minister Stephen Harper said Tuesday in a gathering of Canada’s First Nations chiefs.

“To be sure, our government has no grand scheme to repeal or to unilaterally rewrite the Indian Act,” Harper said in his opening speech.

“After 136 years, that tree has deep roots. Blowing up the stump would just leave a big hole.”

But there are creative, collaborative ways to change it in real and practical ways, he said at a one-day gathering of government and First Nations chiefs in Ottawa, with consultation between the government, the provinces and First Nations communities.

Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/story/2012/01/24/pol-crown-first-nations-tuesday.html?cmp=rss

by NationTalk on January 24, 2012647 Views

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Three Aboriginals Who are Already Making a Difference – Winnipeg Free Press

Three aboriginals who are already making a difference

By: Staff Writer
Posted: 01/24/2012

AS talks between the prime minister, 11 cabinet ministers and the Assembly of First Nations get underway in Ottawa, some observers say they’re worried today’s meeting won’t produce any concrete change.

But, that doesn’t mean nothing is happening.

Many aboriginals across the country aren’t waiting for the federal government to intervene — they’re taking concrete steps to force change in their communities and in Canada. Here are three Manitobans who are making a difference.

Read more: http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/canada/three-aboriginals-who-are-already-making-a-difference-137946403.html

by NationTalk on January 24, 2012451 Views

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First Nations gathering to grapple with education gap – CBC.ca

First Nations gathering to grapple with education gap

Senate committee recommending new aboriginal school board system, national panel reports next month

By Janyce McGregor, CBC News Posted: Jan 23, 2012

One of the most urgent topics up for discussion at Tuesday’s Crown-First Nations gathering is also the one most likely to see concrete progress in the coming weeks: the gap between the educational outcomes of aboriginal and non-aboriginal children.

Fewer than half of First Nations students both on and off reserve graduate from high school, compared to more than 80 per cent of other Canadian young people. Non-aboriginal students are more than 10 times more likely to graduate from university.

It’s a stark discrepancy that bodes ill for the future, especially considering the rapid growth in the school-age aboriginal population across Canada. For example, one estimate suggests that in the province of Saskatchewan, where the economy otherwise has grown significantly in recent years, more than one in five people entering the work force over the next 15 years will be aboriginal.

Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/story/2012/01/23/pol-first-nations-education.html

by NationTalk on January 23, 2012556 Views

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Modern court, traditional design – Ottawa Citizen

Modern court, traditional design

The cyclical process of traditional aboriginal justice is represented in the design of the Specific Claims Tribunal hearing room. But that doesn’t sit well with some of the judges who will be working there, writes Maria Cook

By Maria Cook., Ottawa Citizen January 23, 2012

As courtrooms go, the hearing room of the Specific Claims Tribunal in Ottawa is unusual. For one thing, people sit in a circle and there is no judge’s dais.

The tribunal was established in 2008 to deal with long-standing treaty disputes between First Nations people and the federal government. Hearings are expected to start this spring.

“Justice must be done but it must also be seen to be done,” says Wayne Garnons-Williams, the tribunal’s former deputy head and registrar. He notes that the history of treaty negotiations is characterized by “broken promises, false starts and mistrust.”

Read more: http://www.ottawacitizen.com/news/Modern+court+traditional+design/6035561/story.html#ixzz1kJTf7unW

by NationTalk on January 23, 2012603 Views

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Tsawwassen First Nation’s real-estate development an emancipation from the past – Globe and Mail

Tsawwassen First Nation’s real-estate development an emancipation from the past

Globe and Mail Update
Published Sunday, Jan. 22, 2012

The Tsawwassen First Nation is right to have embarked on ambitious real-estate developments, on its lands in the Lower Mainland of British Columbia. In a vote last week, 97 per cent supported this adaptation to the modern economy.

It amounts to a reversal of centuries of colonialism. This aboriginal community will be the landlords of numerous non-aboriginal businesses and households. It has become – among other things – a capitalist enterprise that will bring into being residential subdivisions with many types of housing, two large shopping malls, and an industrial park adjacent to the port of Vancouver – all this on less than half of the TFN’s 724 hectares.

Read more: http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/opinions/editorials/tsawwassen-first-nations-real-estate-development-an-emancipation-from-the-past/article2310027/?utm_medium=Feeds%3A%20RSS%2FAtom&utm_source=Opinions&utm_content=2310027

by NationTalk on January 23, 2012527 Views

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Education would solve aboriginal challenges, advocate Roberta Jamieson says – Toronto Star

Education would solve aboriginal challenges, advocate Roberta Jamieson says

Published On Sun Jan 22 2012

OTTAWA—The key to solving the challenges facing Canada’s aboriginal communities is ensuring the education of their young people, a leading advocate says.

That’s why education must be the focus when Prime Minister Stephen Harper and senior cabinet ministers gather with First Nations leaders for a high-level summit on Tuesday, Roberta Jamieson, CEO and president of the National Aboriginal Achievement Foundation.

An investment in education will help turn around the fortunes of aboriginal communities and pay dividends for decades to come, she said.

Read more: http://www.thestar.com/news/article/1119400

by NationTalk on January 23, 2012485 Views

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THE HOUSE | Funds for aboriginal education, housing could be protected – CBC.ca

Funds for aboriginal education, housing could be protected

Parliamentary secretary echoes pre-budget message from community stakeholders

CBC News Posted: Jan 21, 2012

The federal government must protect “key areas” of funding for aboriginal communities such as education and housing, one of the government’s top MPs on the portfolio says following pre-budget consultation meetings with community stakeholders.

In an interview airing Saturday on CBC’s Radio The House, Greg Rickford, parliamentary secretary the minister of Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development, would not confim whether the department would be subjected to spending cuts.

“I’m not going to comment on whether there’s a 10 per cent or zero percent out there,” Rickford said.

Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/story/2012/01/21/pol-thehouse-greg-rickford-protect-aboriginal-funding-education-housing.html

by NationTalk on January 23, 2012541 Views

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Aboriginal centre launched at Royal Roads University – Victoria Times Colonist

Aboriginal centre launched at Royal Roads University

By Carla Wilson, timescolonist.com January 21, 2012

An unused wooden boat shed is getting a new life as the Aboriginal Learning and Cultural Centre at Royal Roads University in Colwood.

“It will be a combination of teaching and research space,” said Paul Corns, university associate vice-president of community relations and advancement. It will also house the aboriginal co-ordinator already at Royal Roads, and be available to First Nations communities for cultural celebrations.

The goal is to start work next month with it finishing in June, he said Friday. The university is asking contractors for bids by the end of this month.

Read more: http://www.timescolonist.com/business/Aboriginal+centre+launched+Royal+Roads+University/6030367/story.html#ixzz1kJRyRNGu

by NationTalk on January 23, 2012649 Views

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Calls for inquiry on missing and murdered Aboriginal women – Wawatay News

Calls for inquiry on missing and murdered Aboriginal women

Friday January 20, 2012
Rick Garrick — Wawatay News

Mishkegogamang’s Tom Wassaykeesic welcomes a United Nations call for an inquiry into missing and murdered Aboriginal women after a recent investigation into his mother’s 1976 death failed find anything new.

“To me, there was no smoking gun,” said the Mishkeegogamang councillor about the Ontario Provincial Police’s 2011 investigation into Sophie Wassaykeesic’s death in Central Patricia, now part of Pickle Lake. “We’re talking about witnesses who are no longer around. Those who are still alive can’t really recollect anything.”

Wassaykeesic and his three brothers were disappointed after meeting with representatives from the Coroner’s office and the OPP in Thunder Bay in late December. The original verdict in Sophie’s death still stands: death by asphyxiation.

Read more: http://www.wawataynews.ca/archive/all/2012/1/20/calls-inquiry-missing-and-murdered-aboriginal-women_22302

by NationTalk on January 20, 2012688 Views

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Chuck Strahl: Opposition is spinning native misfortune for partisan gain – National Post

Chuck Strahl: Opposition is spinning native misfortune for partisan gain

National Post Jan 19, 2012
By Chuck Strahl

In 2007, when I was minister of Indian and Northern Affairs, a story broke that the department had “misappropriated” $82-million intended for survivors of residential schools. Worse yet, the story suggested, this money (known as the Common Experience Payment) was earmarked for elderly survivors. The minister and his minions had taken funds designated for the most vulnerable members of aboriginal society. “This is a travesty on a monumental scale if the Conservatives think they can use the Indian residential schools trust fund as a kitty to dip into for purposes completely unrelated,” declared New Democrat MP Pat Martin.

We scrambled in my office, trying to find the source of the story, only to discover that the opposition had simply misread the financial statements: The money had not only been set aside for survivors as promised, but we had paid it out early to elderly First Nations people so they would be amongst the first to receive the funds. The opposition had simply looked up the wrong numbers in the wrong year.

Read more: http://fullcomment.nationalpost.com/2012/01/19/chuck-strahl-opposition-is-spinning-native-misfortune-for-partisan-gain/

by NationTalk on January 20, 2012631 Views

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Tory MP supports UN conference ideas empowering native women – Vancouver Sun

Tory MP supports UN conference ideas empowering native women

By Mia Rabson, Winnipeg Free Press January 19, 2012

OTTAWA — A Manitoba MP believes a United Nations conference held earlier this week can help his government shed some light on the issue of violence against aboriginal women.

Rod Bruinooge, the Conservative MP for Winnipeg South, was at the UN in New York City this week for a three-day conference of the Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues. It arose out of the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, which specifies nations have an obligation to guarantee and to protect aboriginal women and girls in all circumstances.

On Thursday, Bruinooge said he plans to discuss the options brought forward at the meeting with Prime Minister Stephen Harper the first chance he gets.

Read more: http://www.globalwinnipeg.com/Tory+supports+conference+ideas+empowering+native+women/6023920/story.html#ixzz1k26djkwC

by NationTalk on January 20, 2012480 Views

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Success stories – Ottawa Citizen

Success stories

OTTAWA CITIZEN JANUARY 20, 2012

There are plenty of examples of what is wrong with the state of First Nations education across Canada. Almost too many to name. Students on reserves generally have fewer educational opportunities and resources than other Canadians. It is little wonder, then, that dropout rates among aboriginal Canadians are many times higher.

Prime Minister Stephen Harper, who has pledged to make native education a priority, meets with aboriginal leaders next week and education is on the agenda.

In order to really improve both the education system, and outcomes for aboriginal Canadians – and doing so is imperative – it is important to understand the success stories as well as the failures.

Read more: http://www.ottawacitizen.com/news/Success+stories/6023797/story.html#ixzz1k26GPuMJ

by NationTalk on January 20, 2012586 Views

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Joy, bitterness over upcoming canonization of first aboriginal saint, Kateri … – National Post

Joy, bitterness over upcoming canonization of first aboriginal saint, Kateri Tekakwitha

Agence France-Presse Jan 20, 2012
By Sebastian Smith

FONDA, New York – Gazing down a frozen New York field, the statue of a Mohawk girl about to become the first North American aboriginal saint exudes calm. Yet the real Kateri Tekakwitha had a brutal existence — and ghosts from her dramatic life still haunt these hills.

The 17th-century figure will make history when the Vatican canonizes her later this year, although the joy among North America’s indigenous tribes will be mixed with some painful historical memories.

No other “Indian”, as the original inhabitants of the United States and Canada are widely, but wrongly, called, has made sainthood. Following centuries of being dispossessed, caricatured, or ignored, aboriginals will soon have the unusual experience of appearing in a positive light.

Read more: http://life.nationalpost.com/2012/01/20/joy-bitterness-over-upcoming-canonization-of-first-aboriginal-saint-kateri-tekakwitha/

by NationTalk on January 20, 2012519 Views

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Aboriginal leader seeks conference on rights – Globe and Mail

NATIVE AFFAIRS
Aboriginal leader seeks conference on rights

GLORIA GALLOWAY
OTTAWA— From Friday’s Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, Jan. 19, 2012

As Prime Minister Stephen Harper prepares to sit down next week with first nations leaders from across Canada, the chief who speaks for Manitoba says the problems facing his people cannot be solved in a one-day meeting conducted in the absence of the premiers.

Derek Nepinak, the Grand Chief of the Assembly of Manitoba Chiefs, said he will be asking Mr. Harper to schedule a conference of first ministers and first nations at which the loosely defined rights of indigenous people that are guaranteed in the Constitution are explicitly spelled out – especially the resource rights.

Read more: http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/politics/aboriginal-leader-seeks-conference-on-rights/article2308761/?utm_medium=Feeds%3A%20RSS%2FAtom&utm_source=Politics&utm_content=2308761

by NationTalk on January 20, 2012748 Views

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Historic Meeting Harper, Chiefs to Hash Out Concerns – Winnipeg Free Press

historic meeting Harper, chiefs to hash out concerns

By: Teresa Smith
Posted: 01/20/2012

OTTAWA — After more than a year of planning, Prime Minister Stephen Harper, some members of his cabinet and Governor General David Johnston will meet in Ottawa with Assembly of First Nations National Chief Shawn Atleo and chiefs from across Canada Tuesday in what Atleo hopes will be a move to “resetting the relationship.”

It is the first time the prime minister will meet face-to-face and by teleconference with all of the First Nations leadership from across the country and will be the first meeting since the Canadian government apologized in 2008 for separating young aboriginal children from their families and sending them to residential schools across the country.

Some observers are worried the one-day meeting will only serve as a photo-op for the prime minister, but with meetings planned on immediate priorities such as treaties, governance, economic development, land issues and health, others are hoping to hear the government commit to a concrete plan to move forward together.

Read more: http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/canada/historic-meeting-harper-chiefs-to-hash-out-concerns-137742973.html

by NationTalk on January 20, 2012478 Views

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Panel Backs Renewed Plan for Arts – Ottawa Citizen

Panel backs renewed plan for arts

In public gallery, a standing ovation

BY NECO COCKBURN, OTTAWA CITIZEN JANUARY 20, 2012

Council’s community and protective services committee heard plenty of support Thursday for a renewed sixyear, $5-million plan for arts, heritage and culture . and for the consultation process that led to the proposal.

Representatives from a wide range of communities – archeologists and First Nations leaders to arts and heritage enthusiasts – lined up to cheer elements of the “renewed action plan for arts, heritage and culture” from 2013 to 2018, the work of a steering committee and city staff.

“In my view, it is as coherent and comprehensive a document for going forward as you are ever going to find,” said Catherine O’Grady, chairwoman of the city’s arts, heritage and culture advisory committee.

Read more: http://www.ottawacitizen.com/technology/Panel+backs+renewed+plan+arts/6023838/story.html#ixzz1k243GVSs

by NationTalk on January 20, 2012482 Views

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Squamish Set Out to Tell Their Own Stories – North Shore News

Squamish set out to tell their own stories

New Vancouver Maritime Museum exhibit explores history of canoes

By Tessa Holloway, North Shore News January 20, 2012

LONG before cars lined up at the B.C. Ferry terminal in Horseshoe Bay, canoes crisscrossed the Salish Sea.

That history – and the future of this ancient craft – is on display until May 21 at the Vancouver Maritime Museum in Kitsilano, just steps from the former Squamish village site of Fenakw on the shores of False Creek, where the canoes once pushed off to hunt and fish, to travel and to fight.

There’s never been an exhibit that’s brought together all the aspects of Squamish canoe craft, says hereditary chief Ian Campbell.

Read more: http://www.nsnews.com/travel/Squamish+tell+their+stories/6025418/story.html#ixzz1k23lFK57

by NationTalk on January 20, 2012475 Views

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First Nations Call for Better Airports on Reserves – CBC News

First Nations call for better airports on reserves

North Spirit Lake has been asking for plane approach sensors for more than a decade

CBC News Posted: Jan 19, 2012

The Chief of North Spirit Lake First Nation wants to know why it took a deadly plane crash last week to draw attention to the lack of navigational aids for planes landing in her northwestern Ontario community.

Four people died when the plane they were on slammed into the frozen lake Jan. 10, within sight of the runway.

With no road, visitors to North Spirit Lake have no choice but to arrive by air.

Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/thunder-bay/story/2012/01/19/tby-north-spirit-lake-crash-site-visit.html

by NationTalk on January 19, 2012502 Views

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Urban Reserves Gaining Acceptance – The StarPhoenix

Urban reserves gaining acceptance

By Jason Warick, The StarPhoenix January 19, 2012

A gas station on 22nd Street has joined the growing number of “urban reserve” businesses throughout the province, a phenomenon which seems to be gaining widespread acceptance.

Much of the initial uproar of a decade ago has subsided. Neighbouring businesses, other levels of government and the general public realize Cree Way Gas West on 22nd Street and other urban reserve companies make the same payments to municipalities and school divisions that other businesses do.

“Yes, I heard about it. I don’t really have any opinion on it,” said Tracy Hovde, assistant manager of another 22nd Street gas station, Esso on the Run.

Read more: http://www.thestarphoenix.com/Urban+reserves+gaining+acceptance/6017392/story.html#ixzz1jvK0MW3f

by NationTalk on January 19, 2012504 Views

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Shoal Lake First Nation to Take Legal Action Against City – Winnipeg Free Press

Shoal Lake First Nation to take legal action against city

By: Jen Skerritt
Posted: 01/19/2012

A Shoal Lake First Nation has told its lawyers to launch legal action against the City of Winnipeg in an attempt to halt water-sewer deals with West St. Paul and the CentrePort transportation hub.

Iskatewizaagegan No. 39 First Nation threatened to file a court injunction if Winnipeg did not respond to their request for negotiations by Friday. The community is on a section of Shoal Lake that straddles the Manitoba-Ontario border and argues Winnipeg has no right to sell water to neighbouring municipalities before it resolves decades worth of claims over lake water.

It has sent the City of Winnipeg an invoice for $8 million every month since October — the amount the First Nation calculates the city bills its residents for water usage every month.

Read more: http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/local/shoal-lake-first-nation-to-take-legal-action-against-city-137654828.html

by NationTalk on January 19, 2012519 Views

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Native Tradition Meets Four-Star Luxury in Quebec – The Globe and Mail

Native tradition meets four-star luxury in Quebec

CINDA CHAVICH
WENDAKE, QUE.— From Thursday’s Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, Jan. 18, 2012

Hunting and foraging for indigenous ingredients – even flavouring and complementing wild game with plants that grow in their environment – is de rigueur for hyper-local chefs and food lovers.

But for the Huron-Wendat Nation in Wendake, Que., cooking with the bounty of the Earth comes naturally. And that’s just part of the experience at the Hôtel-Musée Premières Nations, a four-star, sleek boutique lodging 15 minutes from the heart of Quebec City that celebrates indigenous connections, from the rooms artfully decorated with fox and beaver pelts, to the subtle flavours of wild herbs from the boreal forest on the plate.

Read more: http://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/travel/vacations/culinary/native-tradition-meets-four-star-luxury-in-quebec/article2306936/?utm_medium=Feeds%3A%20RSS/Atom&utm_source=Life&utm_content=2306936

by NationTalk on January 19, 2012564 Views

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Aboriginal Boxer Named One of 20 Most Influential Women in Sport – The Globe and Mail

Aboriginal boxer named one of 20 most influential women in sport

JAMES CHRISTIE
Globe and Mail Update
Published Wednesday, Jan. 18, 2012

The Canadian Association for the Advancement of Women and Sport and Physical Activity (CAAWS) has named 20 women in its Most Influential Women in Sport and Physical Activity list for 2011, including trailblazing boxer Mary Spencer of Wiarton, Ont., an aboriginal woman who is expected to win an Olympic medal as women’s boxing makes an appearance at the London Games this summer.

Spencer moved up from last year’s Ones to Watch list issued by CAAWS.

Among other names listed as influential women this year are Anne Merklinger, the former top curler who was in charge of Canadian canoe-kayak sport when it rose to be an Olympic power and now director of summer sport for Own the Podium. Also included is federal Health Minister Leona Aglukkaq who is from Nunavut.

Read more: http://www.theglobeandmail.com/sports/more-sports/aboriginal-boxer-named-one-of-20-most-influential-women-in-sport/article2307204/

by NationTalk on January 19, 2012765 Views

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Carleton Youth Raise Funds for First Nations – CBC News

Carleton youth raise funds for First Nations

CBC News Posted: Jan 18, 2012

Aboriginal students at Carleton University are partnering with the Odawa Friendship Centre on a series of fundraising lunches to raise money for remote First Nations communities.

The poor conditions at the Attawapiskat First Nation helped rally the Aboriginal youth in Ottawa to start their own fundraising efforts.

Caroline Lalonde, a student at Odawa’s Urban Aboriginal Alternate High School, said the lunches are her way of contributing.

“Friends of mine and students come from those backgrounds,” said Lalonde. “I’ve heard the stories and I’ve always wanted to do something, but was never able to because I didn’t know how.”

Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/ottawa/story/2012/01/18/ottawa-odawa-fundraising.html

by NationTalk on January 19, 2012590 Views

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Pamphlet is a New Tool in Sensitivity Toward Aboriginal Cultures – Midland Free Press

Pamphlet is a new tool in sensitivity toward aboriginal cultures

By ROBERTA BELL

Chippewas of Rama First Nation and other aboriginal communities are looking to break through stereotypes by raising awareness about their heritage.

“What we hope to do is create understanding,” said Brenda Jackson, aboriginal capacity builder with the Barrie Area Native Advisory Circle (BANAC).

Organizations providing services to First Nation communities have been asking for advice on how best to approach them, she said.

Read more: http://www.midlandfreepress.com/ArticleDisplay.aspx?e=3441526

by NationTalk on January 19, 2012513 Views

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Manitoba Forest a Step Closer to World Heritage Designation – Winnipeg Free Press

Manitoba forest a step closer to world heritage designation

By: Bruce Owen
Posted: 01/19/2012

A decade-long bid to get a huge slice of northern Manitoba designated a United Nations world heritage site will soon be in the hands of UN officials.

The nomination request for a United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) designation by four First Nations on the east side of the province was announced Wednesday by Premier Greg Selinger at the legislative building. The First Nations are Poplar River, Bloodvein, Little Grand Rapids, Pauingassi and includes Pikangikum in northwestern Ontario.

“As you can imagine there’s been so much work to get to this stage, literally years of work and planning done by the First Nations communities,” Selinger told reporters. “It’s a significant milestone in the process we’re entered into.”

Read more: http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/local/manitoba-forest-a-step-closer-to-world-heritage-designation-137654853.html

by NationTalk on January 19, 2012436 Views

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Bookkeeper, Cousin Jailed for Defrauding Aboriginal Groups of Nearly $1 Million – Vancouver Sun

Bookkeeper, cousin jailed for defrauding aboriginal groups of nearly $1 million

BY NEAL HALL, VANCOUVER SUN JANUARY 19, 2012

Two men who defrauded two aboriginal organizations of almost $1 million were sent to jail Wednesday.

B.C. Supreme Court Associate Chief Justice Austin Cullen sentenced Craig Morrison to two years in jail and handed an 18-month jail sentence to his accomplice, Dennis Wells.

The men pleaded guilty last year to two counts of fraud over $5,000 after being caught siphoning off money from the Aboriginal Council of B.C. and the B.C. Aboriginal Fisheries Commission. The organizations were located in an office at Park Royal in West Vancouver.

Read more: http://www.vancouversun.com/news/Bookkeeper+cousin+jailed+defrauding+aboriginal+groups+nearly+million/6018587/story.html#ixzz1jvFI795S

by NationTalk on January 19, 2012524 Views

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