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Vancouver Island Health Authority signs off on aboriginal health plan extension – Campbell River Mirror

Vancouver Island Health Authority signs off on aboriginal health plan extension

March 29, 2012

After suffering a stroke a year ago, Chief David Bob has seen the health care system from all sides now.

“So, I got to see both ends,” Bob said Tuesday at a ceremony to sign a new Aboriginal Health Plan for the Vancouver Island Health Authority.

Bob is the co-chair of the Aboriginal Health Council and was involved in the development of the plan advocating for the needs of aboriginal people in the Island’s health care system.

“And then I end up in the hospital and see what the nurses and doctors go through,” Bob said.

Read more: http://www.campbellrivermirror.com/news/144947845.html

by NationTalk on March 29, 2012486 Views

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Aboriginal women of BC take their fight to DC – HQ Cowichan Valley

Aboriginal women of B.C. take their fight to D.C.

Thursday, March 29, 2012
By Carmen Weld Duncan

They had to go to Washington, D.C. to call out the B.C. and Canadian government for their lack of action regarding missing and murdered aboriginal women in our province.

B.C’s Sharon McIvor with the Canadian Feminist Alliance for International Action shared the plight of the First Nations in front of the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights Wednesday.

McIvor described how she believes aboriginal women are seen by western society.

”An objectified sexual person, that is put in place to satisfy the sexual gratification for the male. And until we can move away from that, they can go and do what they want with those aboriginal women and nobody cares.”

Read more: http://hqcowichanvalley.com/home/local/news/Local/12/03/29/Aboriginal-women-of-B-C-take-their-fight-to-D-C

by NationTalk on March 29, 2012718 Views

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Aboriginal seats protected at Memorial – Macleans.ca

Aboriginal seats protected at Memorial

By Macleans.ca | March 29th, 2012

Human Rights Commission grants special status

Memorial University’s Aboriginal Designated Seats Program has been granted special status by the Newfoundland and Labrador Human Rights Commission, according to today.mun.ca. The status makes it difficult to challenge the up-to three seats that Memorial saves for students of Aboriginal Canadian descent who meet minimum entrance standards in a wide range of programs from visual arts to medicine.

Read more: http://oncampus.macleans.ca/education/2012/03/29/aboriginal-seats-protected-at-memorial/

by NationTalk on March 29, 2012547 Views

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Nunavut youth: immersed in booze, weed, boredom – nunatsiaqonline.ca

Nunavut youth: immersed in booze, weed, boredom

Eight in 10 Nunavut kids smoke dope by age 18

JANE GEORGE
Nunavut March 28, 2012

To be young in Nunavut often means to be stoned, drunk and bored, researchers funded by Health Canada reported March 27 at an Iqaluit community meeting.

Iqaluit and Kimmirut youth aged 11 to 20 are two to three times more likely to take drugs and drink alcohol than their peers in southern Canada, the researchers said.

Most start smoking marijuana and drinking alcohol by age 14, and nearly all youth are smoking dope and drinking by the time they turn 18.

Read more: http://www.nunatsiaqonline.ca/stories/article/65674nunavut_youth_immersed_in_booze_weed_boredom/

by NationTalk on March 29, 2012588 Views

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“Stand With Us to Fight” – Dominion Paper

“Stand With Us to Fight”

Hundreds protest Enbridge pipeline and oil tankers at Heiltsuk-led rally

MARCH 28, 2012

VANCOUVER—Hundreds of people from First Nations, environmental and community organizations and others from Vancouver and beyond rallied against Enbridge’s Northern Gateway pipeline and coastal oil supertanker traffic earlier today, filling the Vancouver Art Gallery grounds.

A march led by the Heiltsuk Nation, of the Central Coast, departed from the Coastal First Nations office at Granville and Hastings streets and wound its way through the downtown business district to join those waiting at the Vancouver Art Gallery. The rally marked the 23rd anniversary of the Exxon Valdez oil spill off the coast of Alaska, which spilled hundreds of thousands of barrels of oil on March 24, 1989.

Read more: http://www.dominionpaper.ca/articles/4402

by NationTalk on March 29, 2012450 Views

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Student and teacher learn from first-ever First Nations Human Resources National Conference – commons.bcit.ca

Student and teacher learn from first-ever First Nations Human Resources National Conference

Posted on March 27, 2012 by Andrea Bellamy

It was a unique opportunity with equally unique learning outcomes. The First Nations National Human Resources Conference, held in Winnipeg Manitoba this February, was the first of its kind in Canada.

Human Resource Management Program Head Debby Cleveland attended the conference along with Michelle Dragon, a second-year Human Resource Management student.

“The conference appealed to me because of the potentially significant role that First Nations have in major developments that are on the horizon for northern British Columbia,” says Debby. “Historically, programs that included First Nations communities as a significant component of the work force on major developments have encountered many challenges. I wanted to learn about some of the issues from the presenters and delegates at the conference.”

Read more: http://commons.bcit.ca/update/2012/03/student-and-teacher-learn-from-first-ever-first-nations-human-resources-national-conference/

by NationTalk on March 28, 2012450 Views

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Lens of Empowerment exhibit focuses on women in Stó:lō territory – UFV Today

Lens of Empowerment exhibit focuses on women in Stó:lō territory

by Ashley Wray on March 26, 2012

Give people the tools to express what they see, and you never know what they’ll show you.

That is the idea behind the Lens of Empowerment project, a three-course program undertaken by 11 UFV students that examines the lives and experiences of women in Stó:lō territory.

The Fraser Valley audience will have the chance to view the results of the project on Friday, March 30 at the opening and premiere of the Lens of Empowerment exhibition. The photographic and video exhibit opening ceremony will be at 3 pm in the gallery in Room B136 on the Abbotsford campus. The students will then show their videos in the lecture theatre (B101) at 5 pm. The public is welcome and attendance is free.

Part of the inspiration for this project came from a desire to acknowledge Stó:lō territory for future generations.

Read more: http://blogs.ufv.ca/2012/03/lens-of-empowerment-exhibit-focuses-on-women-in-stolo-territory/

by NationTalk on March 28, 2012421 Views

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Best New Restaurants 2012: No. 4 Keriwa – Toronto Life

Best New Restaurants 2012: No. 4 Keriwa

On Monday and Tuesday, we’re counting down Toronto’s 10 best new restaurants as selected by Toronto Life’s trusted critics. Stay tuned as we take you from number 10 through to number one over the next two days.

On the ceiling of Toronto’s only Native Canadian restaurant, dangling feathers bounce to the bass of Motown hits. On the walls: photos of a man in full Aboriginal regalia dancing through the streets of modern Paris. We get it: Keriwa blends the traditional and the contemporary, the rustic and the urban. It’s a message adapted by Bannock, Toca and other Canada-themed restaurants, but in this hunter’s lodge of a room, the combination is seamless. The place is filled with Parkdalian daters clinking glasses of red wine or guzzling pints and enjoying the smoke-kissed creations of Aaron Joseph Bear Robe.

Read more: http://www.torontolife.com/daily/daily-dish/from-the-print-edition-daily-dish/2012/03/27/best-new-restaurants-2012-4-keriwa/

by NationTalk on March 27, 2012799 Views

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Top court’s ruling on native hardship impacts local case – Winnipeg Free Press

Top court’s ruling on native hardship impacts local case

Case suspended, suspect’s bio revamped

By: Mike McIntyre
Posted: 03/27/2012

She’s a convicted drug dealer with a tragic background that came from growing up on a Manitoba reserve. And she is exactly the type of criminal Canada’s highest court says should be in line for a reduced penalty based on her upbringing.

Rita Parenteau was supposed to be sentenced on Monday after pleading guilty to having a large quantity of cocaine and morphine inside her Winnipeg home. The Crown is seeking a penitentiary term, while her lawyer wants a conditional sentence that allows her to remain free in the community.

But the case has now been adjourned indefinitely because justice officials concede there hasn’t been a thorough examination of her native ancestry. A probation report previously ordered late last year was riddled with errors and missing information, court heard Monday. For example, the report included a detailed history of life on the remote Shamattawa reserve. Yet Parenteau is from Lake St. Martin.

Read more: http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/local/top-courts-ruling-on-native-hardship-impacts-local-case-144333455.html

by NationTalk on March 27, 2012467 Views

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Aboriginal mining careers promoted in training portal – Northern Ontario Business

Aboriginal mining careers promoted in training portal

Mining 101

By: Ian Ross

Aboriginal youth in northwestern Ontario are getting a head-start on training opportunities in the mining industry.

Oshki-Pimanche-O-Win Education and Training Institute is receiving more than $700,000 from Ottawa and Human Resources and Skills Development Canada to inform and steer young people in the 16-to-29 age range toward careers in the minerals sector.

A project called Learning 2 Mine will provide training and work experiences in the industry for Aboriginal youth in Northern Ontario. The project will focus on increasing “mining literacy” and training them in essential skills.

Read more: http://www.northernontariobusiness.com/DisplayArticle.aspx?id=22443

by NationTalk on March 27, 2012571 Views

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Aboriginal Task Force Begins Work – The StarPhoenix

Aboriginal task force begins work

Goal to close employment, education gap

By Jason Warick, The StarPhoenix March 27, 2012

Now is the time for First Nations and Metis students “to take their rightful place in this province,” says the chair of a new aboriginal education task force.

“This province is leading the nation, if not the world, in innovation and prosperity,” task force chair Gary Merasty said Monday. “If there is a time to act, it certainly is now.”

Merasty, a former teacher and member of Parliament, will head the Joint Task Force on Improving Education and Employment Outcomes for First Nations and Metis People in Saskatchewan.

Read more: http://www.thestarphoenix.com/life/Aboriginal+task+force+begins+work/6363656/story.html#ixzz1qKcY3kZi

by NationTalk on March 27, 2012560 Views

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Land Sale Highlights Ownership Rules Quirk – Daily News

Land sale highlights ownership rules quirk

BY DARRELL BELLAART, DAILY NEWS MARCH 27, 2012

A quarter-acre lot on some First Nations land in Cedar, put on the market this month, can only be purchased by Snuneymuxw First Nation members.

A federal government has run a quarter-page newspaper advertisement calling for bids from Snuneymuxw band members on a property described as Lot 14 on the Nanaimo River Indian Reserve No. 3.

It illustrates a quirk of the rules regulating ownership of Indian Reserve land in Canada. The land is held by the Crown for aboriginal use, and while band members can build and own homes on lots on reserve land, title to the land can only be in the name of band members.

Read more: http://www.canada.com/Land+sale+highlights+ownership+rules+quirk/6364546/story.html

by NationTalk on March 27, 2012493 Views

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Duncan Meets with Aboriginal Students – Comox Valley Echo

Duncan meets with aboriginal students

BY LISE BROADLEY, COMOX VALLEY ECHO MARCH 27, 2012

The Comox Valley School District will work with First Nation students to design and implement a series of courses and activities that explore and promote aboriginal traditions.

The commitment came during a meeting with Vancouver Island North Member of Parliament and Minister of Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development John Duncan. At the informal meeting, Duncan met with members of the K’ómoks First Nation, school board trustees, district staff and Valley students involved with Aboriginal Education Services.

One group of students, the Junior Aboriginal Education Council, a pilot project operating out of Highland Secondary, requested more support from the school district for programs that celebrate aboriginal traditions and teach students about different aspects of aboriginal culture, customs and skills.

Read more: http://www.canada.com/Duncan+meets+with+aboriginal+students/6364256/story.html

by NationTalk on March 27, 2012589 Views

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Preliminary Census Numbers Reflect Growing First Nations Population – Indian Country Today

Preliminary Census Numbers Reflect Growing First Nations Population

By ICTMN Staff March 26, 2012

When preliminary census data from the 2011 count were released earlier this year, people like Elsipogtog First Nation Chief Jesse Simon were not surprised.

“We’re an exploding population,” he told CBC News, alluding to the five percent increase in Elsipogtog population since the last census was taken in 2006. “We are growing five times faster than the national average. I think First Nations across Canada are generally growing three times faster. We’ve hit the million mark.”

And, although CBC News said the recent data counted 2,000 Elsipogtog members on the First Nation reserve in New Brunswick, Simon said the actual count is more like 3,200. Moreover, 60 percent of them are under age 30.

Read more: http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2012/03/26/preliminary-census-numbers-reflect-growing-first-nations-population-104728

by NationTalk on March 26, 2012693 Views

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Flooded Manitoba First Nation Could be Salvaged – CBC News

Flooded Manitoba First Nation could be salvaged

Lake St. Martin officials insist on relocating reserve

CBC News Posted: Mar 26, 2012

A Manitoba First Nation that was seriously damaged by last year’s floods could be salvaged, meaning its members may not have to move to a new community, according to the provincial government.

Government engineers and experts are working on a preliminary report for the Lake St. Martin First Nation, which has been without a home since last spring’s extreme flooding rendered the existing reserve uninhabitable.

A variety of options are being studied, including the possibility of rebuilding the existing reserve site, said Don Norquay, the province’s deputy minister responsible for First Nations flood issues.

Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/manitoba/story/2012/03/25/mb-lake-st-martin-flood.html

by NationTalk on March 26, 2012547 Views

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Three Pond Inlet Residents Receive Diamond Jubilee Medals – Nunatsiaq Online

Three Pond Inlet residents receive Diamond Jubilee medals

Theresa Koopa Maktar, David Parks and Thomas Ootook among 60,000 Canadians slated for the awards

NUNATSIAQ NEWS

Three Nunavummiut from Pond Inlet — Theresa Koopa Maktar, David Parks and Thomas Ootook — have received Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee medals in recognition of their contributions to the community.

While in Pond Inlet on March 23, Premier Eva Aariak presented the medals, which mark the 2012 celebrations of the 60th anniversary of Queen Elizabeth II’s accession to the throne.

Some 60,000 Canadians will receive Diamond Jubilee medals during the year.

Read more: http://www.nunatsiaqonline.ca/stories/article/65674three_people_in_pond_inlet_receive_diamond_jubilee_medals/

by NationTalk on March 26, 2012446 Views

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Federal budget potential turning point for native schools – CBC.ca

Federal budget potential turning point for native schools

Tension, confrontation on the rise since January’s Crown-First Nations gathering

The Canadian Press Posted: Mar 26, 2012

When it comes to funding First Nations education in the federal budget, there’s far more at stake than just improving schools for native children.

As if that alone weren’t enough, the future of Shawn Atleo’s leadership of the Assembly of First Nations and the very nature of the relationship between Ottawa and aboriginal people are on the line as well.

Atleo took a political gamble last year by agreeing to a joint AFN-federal effort that would tackle First Nations education and take a collaborative, step-by-step approach to resolving the many outstanding issues on the aboriginal file.

Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/story/2012/03/26/pol-cp-first-nations-education-atleo.html

by NationTalk on March 26, 2012495 Views

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Métis want fair share? – Alberta Daily Herald

Métis want fair share

The Enbridge Northern Gateway pipeline would run through 55 aboriginal settlements

By ADAM JACKSON Herald-Tribune staff

The main topic of a recent Métis Economic Summit in Grande Prairie was the proposed Enbridge Northern Gateway pipeline planned to run through approximately 50 different aboriginal settlements to the Pacific coast.

Sylvia Johnson of Peace River, Region 6 president of the Métis Nation of Alberta, said representatives from both Alberta and B.C. are concerned with the project, set to run from the Edmonton area to Kitimat, B.C.

“This summit is very important to Region 6 Métis,” said Johnson. “The Métis need to get a foot in the door, be considered for part ownership and be considered as the people who were here first.

Read more: http://www.dailyheraldtribune.com/ArticleDisplay.aspx?e=3514320

by NationTalk on March 26, 2012461 Views

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Standoff ends peacefully on Duncan First Nations reserve? – Victoria Times Colonist

Standoff ends peacefully on Duncan First Nations reserve

timescolonist.com March 25, 2012

North Cowichan-Duncan RCMP offcers peacefully concluded a standoff Sunday morning with a man suspected to have weapons in his home.

About eight family members were evacuated from the home around dawn after an apparent domestic dispute.

The man had remained in the home, refusing to come out for police, Staff Sgt. Jack MacNeill said at 8 a.m. at the scene.

Mounties in tactical gear then swarmed the small wooden home on the Duncan First Nations reserve at 5110 Trans-Canada Highway.

Read more: http://www.timescolonist.com/news/Standoff+ends+peacefully+Duncan+First+Nations+reserve/6356705/story.html#ixzz1qF8J0RwU

by NationTalk on March 26, 2012571 Views

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Flood threat triggers evacuations at two Ontario aboriginal … – Globe and Mail

Flood threat triggers evacuations at two Ontario aboriginal communities

RENATA D’ALIESIO
Globe and Mail Update
Published Sunday, Mar. 25, 2012

The threat of flooding has prompted two Northern Ontario aboriginal communities to declare a state of emergency and to relocate their most vulnerable residents.

About 50 people were flown Saturday to Kapuskasing from Kashechewan First Nation, said Greg Flood, a spokesman with Ontario’s Ministry of Community Safety. Another 300 residents from Kashechewan and Fort Albany first nations, both located along the Albany River near James Bay, are expected to be moved Sunday to Kapuskasing and Wawa. However, weather conditions and the availability of planes could delay some residents from leaving, Mr. Flood noted an e-mail.

Leaders of the first nations are keeping a close watch on the Albany River. The breakup of ice on the river has caused ice jams to form near the remote, low-lying communities, resulting in minor flooding. First nation leaders are worried the situation could worsen. The river has burst its banks several times in the past eight years, prompting repeated evacuations.

Read more: http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/flood-threat-triggers-evacuations-at-two-ontario-aboriginal-communities/article2380676/

by NationTalk on March 26, 2012466 Views

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The disappeared? – London Free Press

The disappeared

BOOK REVIEW: Aboriginal women targeted in Harlick’s Green Place for Dying

By JOAN BARFOOT, SPECIAL TO QMI AGENCY
Last Updated: March 24, 2012

R.J. Harlick has picked a tragically relevant focus for her latest Meg Harris crime novel — the disappearances, far too often officially ignored and unexamined, of aboriginal women.

More than 500 aboriginal women across Canada are missing at last count. In A Green Place for Dying, Harlick has narrowed her plot to the Ottawa-Hull-Gatineau area and a nearby First Nations community, and aimed her fiercest ammunition at uncaring — read racist — cops with no great interest in the vanishings.

Instead the search for a promising young woman who went missing shortly after arriving in Ottawa to pursue her education lies mainly in the hands of friends, including the police and the chief from the Migiskan Reserve a couple of hours northeast of the capital.

Read more: http://www.lfpress.com/entertainment/books/2012/03/18/19519301.html

by NationTalk on March 26, 2012556 Views

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Cowessess First Nation settles Flood Claim after decades of … – Grenfell Sun Express

Cowessess First Nation settles Flood Claim after decades of negotiations

Published on March 24, 2012
Andrea Nicholl

The ratification vote for the Cowessess First Nation Flood Claim Settlement Agreement and related documents has passed with an 86 per cent vote in favour.

According to the Department of Indian Affairs 2,652 band members were eligible to vote. Of the eligible voters, 1,327 members were required to vote and 665 had to agree for a successful vote.

The Settlement Agreement passed on March 10, with 1,227 voters in favour; 179 opposed; and 26 rejected for a total of 1,432 votes.

Read more: http://www.grenfellsun.sk.ca/News/Justice/2012-03-24/article-2938498/Cowessess-First-Nation-settles-Flood-Claim-after-decades-of-negotiations/1

by NationTalk on March 26, 2012622 Views

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NDP laggards on mining file? – Winnipeg Free Press

NDP laggards on mining file

By: Editorial
Posted: 03/24/2012

The mining industry in Manitoba has for years complained it is hampered by delays in getting permits and licences for exploring mineral deposits here, and this hurts the province’s economy. Now First Nations leaders are saying the same. The results of exploration investment in this province appear to back up their complaints.

Since the duty to consult First Nations on resource development on traditional lands was recognized more than 20 years ago, other provinces have been working on setting out criteria of when consultation should be triggered and then when the benefits of development should flow to bands. No First Nation can legally prohibit exploration, but the disputes that have blown up into protracted court fights have shown mining investors and explorers such fights are not worth it. In 2008, Manitoba saw $152 million in investment; last year it was $110 million. That, First Nations leaders and the mining industry here say, is indicative of the fact Manitoba has not set out a good process for managing relations between private and First Nations parties.

Read more: http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/opinion/editorials/ndp-laggards-on-mining-file-144072916.html

by NationTalk on March 26, 2012501 Views

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Steering between two worlds? – North Shore News

Steering between two worlds

First Nations policing takes on old injustices

North Shore News March 25, 2012

JEFF Palmer’s duties this morning are hardly the stuff of cop dramas.

Sitting in his cruiser outside the North Vancouver RCMP detachment on a recent rainy Wednesday, the police constable goes over the day’s assignments: He’s helping with the search for a young man who disappeared from a group home; he’s been asked by a couple going through a breakup to stand by while the man removes his belongings from their shared home; and at lunch he’ll be stopping by the Squamish Nation Elders Centre to give an update on schoolzone speed enforcement. In the afternoon, he might put his head in at the Nation’s youth centre to see how things are going. The tasks may not be glamorous, he explains, but they are important.

Read more: http://www.nsnews.com/life/Steering+between+worlds/6356496/story.html#ixzz1qF4CnXcj

by NationTalk on March 26, 2012383 Views

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Yukon schools struggle with poor attendance? – CBC.ca

Yukon schools struggle with poor attendance

High school students on average missed more than a month of school in 2010-2011

CBC News Posted: Mar 24, 2012

Attendance is a big problem at Yukon high schools, according to data from at least one school council and the Yukon Department of Education.

There are 570 students enrolled at F.H. Collins Secondary School in Whitehorse and since September there have been close to 5,500 unexcused absences.

The school’s council also provided numbers of excused — or approved — absences, which total about 1,000 over the same time period.

The school council’s numbers are confirmed by data from the last school year for the entire territory that show a typical Yukon high school student had on average more than a month’s worth of unexcused absences.

Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/north/story/2012/03/24/north-yukon-school-absences.html

by NationTalk on March 26, 2012504 Views

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In Jack’s shadow? – Winnipeg Free Press

In Jack’s shadow

‘He will be with us for a long time’

By: Mia Rabson
Posted: 03/24/2012

OTTAWA — There is absolutely no doubt: The NDP is still clearly Jack’s party.

From the leadership candidates’ final speeches to the sale of $100 framed photographs to T-shirts emblazoned with the words “I am the Layton Legacy,” the late Jack Layton’s memory hovered over every aspect of the leadership convention Friday.

The opening day of the two-day event ended with an hour-long tribute to the man who led the federal party to its best electoral finish ever. Video screens carried images of the chalk art and messages mourners left on sidewalks after Layton’s death last August.

Assembly of First Nations National Chief Shawn Atleo praised Layton’s commitment to First Nations, and numerous videos offered memories of Layton from across the country and across the political spectrum, from everyday Canadians to former prime ministers Jean Chrétien and Brian Mulroney.

Read more: http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/local/in-jacks-shadow-144073046.html

by NationTalk on March 26, 2012493 Views

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BC first nation one step closer to $17.5-million treaty? – Globe and Mail

B.C. first nation one step closer to $17.5-million treaty

COMOX VALLEY, B.C.— The Canadian Press
Published Saturday, Mar. 24, 2012

Members of a small first nation in Vancouver Island’s picturesque Comox Valley have taken a major step toward securing $17.5-million and more than 2,000 hectares of land under a final treaty.

The K’omoks First Nation, which has about 275 members, signed an agreement in principle Saturday with the provincial and federal governments.

An AIP is the second-to-last stage in the treaty-negotiating process and signals the start of final talks between the parties.

Of the 60 first nations participating in the treaty process, only two, the Maa-nulth, located on Vancouver Island’s west coast, and the Tsawwassen, located south of Vancouver, have signed final treaties, according to the BC Treaty Commission.

Read more: http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/british-columbia/bc-first-nation-one-step-closer-to-175-million-treaty/article2380502/

by NationTalk on March 26, 2012533 Views

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Groves: Inspired to make a difference in First Nations communities? – CBC.ca

Groves: Inspired to make a difference in First Nations communities

By Kristina Groves, special to CBC Sports Posted: Mar 24, 2012

It’s the honest truth that most of the news we hear about First Nations communities in Canada is overwhelmingly bad. I pay close enough attention to current affairs to at least know that. The most recent wave of bad news to wash over the country has been about the remote Attawapiskat First Nation in Northern Ontario. Did anybody see? Did anybody hear? Maybe it’s the relentless barrage of global tragedies that makes us numb to more bad news.

We either do not believe or support what we hear. We are loath to admit that this is the reality in Canada, our Canada, that Aboriginal children are reaching suicide rates substantially higher than elsewhere in Canada, and the world.

It seems unlikely to us that they receive significantly less funding for healthcare and education, that some have no school at all and that their parents still struggle to overcome years of trauma at residential schools.

Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/sports/story/2012/03/24/sp-kristina-groves-righttoplay-first-nations.html

by NationTalk on March 26, 2012440 Views

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Aboriginal background must be considered in violent crime sentencing, top … – National Post

Aboriginal background must be considered in violent crime sentencing, top court rules

Postmedia News Mar 23, 2012
By Bradley Bouzane

OTTAWA — The Supreme Court of Canada ruled Friday that the history of Aboriginal People in this country should have a bearing on how violent offenders are dealt with in court.

The country’s top court weighed in on Gladue principle — a directive from Parliament — which asks judges to recognize that a history of colonization, residential schools and cultural repression has affected generations of indigenous men and women, leading to a severe over-representation of Aboriginal People in Canada’s prisons.

It applied the intent of that principle on two previous cases, one in Ontario and another in B.C.

Read more: http://news.nationalpost.com/2012/03/23/aboriginal-background-must-be-considered-in-violent-crime-sentencing-top-court/

by NationTalk on March 23, 2012553 Views

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Supreme Court examines aboriginal sentencing – Ottawa Citizen

Supreme Court examines aboriginal sentencing

Will decide if nation’s history should be factor

BY TERESA SMITH, OTTAWA CITIZEN MARCH 23, 2012

To what degree should the history of aboriginal people in Canada factor into how courts sentence violent offenders?

That’s the complex question that will be addressed Friday as the Supreme Court of Canada weighs in on the controversial Gladue principle with two precedent-setting cases.

The principle, a directive from Parliament, asks judges to recognize that a history of colonization, residential schools and cultural repression has affected generations of indigenous men and women, leading to a severe over-representation of aboriginal people in prisons.

Read more: http://www.ottawacitizen.com/news/Supreme+Court+examines+aboriginal+sentencing/6345787/story.html#ixzz1pyacwGGk

by NationTalk on March 23, 2012546 Views

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Federal budget will define Ottawa’s relationship with First Nations – Winnipeg Free Press

Federal budget will define Ottawa’s relationship with First Nations

By: Heather Scoffield, The Canadian Press
Posted: 03/23/2012

OTTAWA – When it comes to funding First Nations education in the federal budget, there’s far more at stake than just improving schools for native children.

As if that alone weren’t enough, the future of Shawn Atleo’s leadership of the Assembly of First Nations and the very nature of the relationship between Ottawa and aboriginal people are on the line as well.

Atleo took a political gamble last year by agreeing to a joint AFN-federal effort that would tackle First Nations education and take a collaborative, step-by-step approach to resolving the many outstanding issues on the aboriginal file.

Read more: http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/canada/federal-budget-will-define-ottawas-relationship-with-first-nations-144010276.html

by NationTalk on March 23, 2012551 Views

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Longtime aboriginal advocate receives award – Vancouver Courier

Longtime aboriginal advocate receives award

Community service

Although Marjorie White and Genoa Point represent separate generations of aboriginal people, each will receive “Community Courage Awards” for their work in Vancouver and beyond

By Mike Howell, Vancouver Courier March 23, 2012

Seven years ago, 500 people turned up at the Croatian Cultural Centre on Commercial Drive to honour Marjorie White for her pioneering work in the aboriginal community.

The event was billed as a retirement party. There she was, at 69, humbly accepting praise from colleagues for staying true to the meaningful grind of establishing a series of support systems for aboriginal people in Vancouver.

Praise is what people give when one woman has had a hand in founding the city’s first so-called friendship centre, an association for First Nations women and a halfway house for aboriginal men. Those achievements alone are remarkable for one person.

Read more: http://www.vancourier.com/life/Community+service/6349651/story.html#ixzz1pya4ysj8

by NationTalk on March 23, 2012729 Views

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Aboriginals ready to mine north for jobs – Winnipeg Free Press

Aboriginals ready to mine north for jobs

Province stalling talks, chiefs say

By: Alexandra Paul
Posted: 03/23/2012

Manitoba’s aboriginal chiefs say the province is missing out on millions of dollars worth of development by leaving northern First Nations out of mining deals.

“We’re not anti-development. We’re pro-development. We want to have jobs and we want to have the projects,” Manitoba Keewatinowi Okimakanak Grand Chief David Harper said Thursday at a press conference with leaders of northern First Nations.

The problem is talks with the province and mining and exploration companies keep stalling, Harper said.
Provincial and federal governments owe a constitutional duty to consult and accommodate First Nations whenever development, including mining, has an impact on aboriginal or treaty rights.

Read more: http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/local/aboriginals-ready-to-mine-north-for-jobs-143939446.html

by NationTalk on March 23, 2012892 Views

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Parole board lacks aboriginal appointees, ex-member says – CBC.ca

Parole board lacks aboriginal appointees, ex-member says

CBC News Posted: Mar 22, 2012

A former member of the Parole Board of Canada says he is worried there are not enough aboriginal members on the board.

According to John Dorion, who was a part-time member of the board for three years beginning in 2004, it has been several years since an aboriginal person has been appointed to the board.

Dorion, who is First Nations, said many aboriginal inmates have lost confidence in the parole system.

“So, in order to address that problem, that’s why they brought us in. That’s why they brought the aboriginal people in,” Dorion said. “I see this whole thing as racism coming back.”

Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/saskatchewan/story/2012/03/21/sk-aboriginal-parole-board-120321.html

by NationTalk on March 22, 2012455 Views

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Exhibit features urban Coast Salish works – Victoria Times Colonist

Exhibit features urban Coast Salish works

Friendship Centre displays selection of pieces from its collection

By Amy Smart, Times Colonist March 22, 2012

EXHIBIT

Celebrating 40 Years of Urban Aboriginal Art

Where: Victoria Native Friendship Centre, 231 Regina Ave.

When: Thursday and Friday, 6 to 8 p.m.

The Victoria Native Friendship Centre opens its doors today and Friday to present a selection of pieces from its collection of nearly 300 artworks.

The collection serves a dual purpose for the community, said co-curator Peter Morin, who is also Tahltan curator-in-residence at Open Space.

Read more: http://www.timescolonist.com/Exhibit+features+urban+Coast+Salish+works/6341448/story.html#ixzz1prHt0PT9

by NationTalk on March 22, 2012436 Views

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Terrace Bay man says racism drove him from the oil patch – CBC.ca

Terrace Bay man says racism drove him from the oil patch

Human rights advocate says Aboriginal awareness lacking in the boardroom and the job site

Jody Porter CBC News Posted: Mar 22, 2012

A man from Terrace Bay has filed a complaint with the Alberta Human Rights Commission after he says his supervisor made racist comments.

Daniel Chaboyer is a big man, accustomed to standing up for himself. Sometimes in his younger days, he did so with his fists.

But when Chaboyer met an even more physically imposing supervisor, a man who he said liked to refer to him as “my Indian,” Chaboyer took a different route.

Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/thunder-bay/story/2012/03/22/tby-human-rights-complaint.html

by NationTalk on March 22, 2012993 Views

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Court upholds native fishers’ tax exemption – Winnipeg Free Press

Court upholds native fishers’ tax exemption

By: Alexandra Paul
Posted: 03/22/2012

A pair of fishers from Norway House has taken on the federal taxman and won a court ruling that could open the door to tax-free commercial fishing off-reserve.

“It’s wonderful news,” Norway House Cree Nation Chief Ron Evans said Wednesday. “I think it’s obvious the fishermen are always busy exercising their treaty rights.”

In a decision by Justice John Evans of the Federal Court of Appeal, the court rejected arguments by the Canada Revenue Agency that the income earned by two fishers — Ronald Robertson and Roger Saunders — should be taxed, despite an Indian Act tax exemption they argued they were eligible to use.

Read more: http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/local/court-upholds-native-fishers-tax-exemption-143775196.html

by NationTalk on March 22, 2012687 Views

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‘I saw I couldn’t do my job,’ says lawyer who quit missing women inquiry – Victoria Times Colonist

‘I saw I couldn’t do my job,’ says lawyer who quit missing women inquiry

By JUDITH LAVOIE, timescolonist.com March 22, 2012

Quitting was better than giving credibility to a flawed process by continuing to struggle to represent aboriginal interests at the Missing Women Commission of Inquiry, lawyer Robyn Gervais said Wednesday.

Gervais withdrew on

March 6, saying there was a disproportionate focus on police evidence and aboriginal interests were not being met.

“Initially, I thought it was better to have some aboriginal voices at the table,” said Gervais, who took part in a panel discussion at the University of Victoria Wednesday.

Read more: http://www.timescolonist.com/news/couldn+says+lawyer+quit+missing+women+inquiry/6339857/story.html#ixzz1prGXacuU

by NationTalk on March 22, 2012503 Views

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‘Dysfunctional’ aboriginals need jobs: Tory – Vancouver Sun

‘Dysfunctional’ aboriginals need jobs: Tory

Ottawa minister stirs first nations anger with comment on speeding up resources development

By Fiona Anderson, Vancouver Sun March 22, 2012

Many aboriginal communities are “socially dysfunctional,” and could benefit from developments that bring jobs and revenue to them, Canada’s Minister of Natural Resources Joe Oliver said at a Vancouver Board of Trade breakfast Wednesday.

Oliver was talking about the need to amend Canada’s regulatory process to ensure mining and other resource-development projects could proceed in a timely fashion.

But amendments to the cur-rent environmental assessment process – which Oliver said would be introduced within the next few months – would still ensure the projects were “safe for Canadians and safe for the environment,” he said.

Read more: http://www.vancouversun.com/business/Dysfunctional+aboriginals+need+jobs+Tory/6341582/story.html#ixzz1prFv1YsF

by NationTalk on March 22, 2012637 Views

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New generation of leaders in city for big conferences – Canada.com

New generation of leaders in city for big conferences

Youngsters look to find progressive solutions for issues face on nation’s reserves

BY TAMARA CUNNINGHAM, DAILY NEWS MARCH 22, 2012

As the fastest-growing population group in Canada, aboriginal youth will wield significant power to help their communities, young leaders say.

Aboriginal youth from across Canada have converged on Nanaimo this week for the Snuneymuxw First Nation’s Vision Your Future conference at Beban Park and Gathering Our Voices, an annual event put on by the B.C. Association of Aboriginal Friendship Centres. The events are a chance for youth to build skills through workshops and become inspired by achievements of their peers.

But it is also an opportunity for young people to consider their future as one of the largest population groups in Canada.

Read more: http://www.canada.com/generation+leaders+city+conferences/6341157/story.html

by NationTalk on March 22, 2012436 Views

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Aboriginal music finds home at Junos – Edmonton Journal

Aboriginal music finds home at Junos

BY PATRICK LANGSTON, POSTMEDIA NEWS MARCH 22, 2012

There’s a nominee who’s a straight-up country musician. There’s a bluesman. And a duo that blends traditional powwow music with decidedly non-First-Nations house music.

So what exactly makes an act eligible for the Junos’ Aboriginal Recording of the Year category? And considering the history of native peoples in Canada, is having such a category perpetuating apartness?

“It’s not a racial category, it’s a musical category,” says Brian Wright-McLeod, a Dakota-Anishnabe and chair of the Junos’ aboriginal category. Eligible styles include all traditional forms, hand drums and traditional flutes, Inuit throat singing, and Metis and other fiddling. Also eligible are fusions of all genres of contemporary music that incorporate the eligible styles and/or reflect the aboriginal experience in Canada through words or music. And 50 per cent of an album’s listening time has to meet the above criteria. The judges are First Nations people involved in music, arts and culture.

Read more: http://www.edmontonjournal.com/entertainment/Aboriginal+music+finds+home+Junos/6340904/story.html

by NationTalk on March 22, 2012525 Views

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Help sought after welcomes wore out – Winnipeg Free Press

Help sought after welcomes wore out

Explanation for ballooning evacuee list:

By: Larry Kusch
Posted: 03/21/2012

The number of Lake St. Martin First Nation evacuees has soared in recent months as flooded-out residents wore out their welcome with friends and relatives and turned to the authorities for help.

That was the explanation offered Tuesday by the president of the Manitoba Association of Native Fire Fighters, which is responsible for processing assistance claims on behalf of Ottawa.

Gerald Houle said when rising lake levels last year overwhelmed the Manitoba First Nation, many residents moved in with friends and relatives in neighbouring communities and did not immediately claim compensation. But after a time, they wore out their welcome.

Read more: http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/local/help-sought-after-welcomes-wore-out-143609616.html

by NationTalk on March 21, 2012736 Views

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Mayor apologizes for past racist remarks – CBC.ca

Mayor apologizes for past racist remarks

During race-relations event Keith Hobbs says racism will not be tolerated in Thunder Bay

CBC News Posted: Mar 21, 2012

About 200 people came out for a discussion on Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal race relations in Thunder Bay Tuesday night.

Mayor Keith Hobbs, Fort William First Nation Chief Peter Collins, Wendy Landry President of the Thunder Bay Council of the Metis Nation of Ontario and Lakehead University president Brian Stevenson were among the speakers at the event, which was hosted by the university.

Many of the people in the audience were moved when Hobbs said he wanted to publicly apologize for making racist remarks in the past.

Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/thunder-bay/story/2012/03/21/tby-race-relations-event.html

by NationTalk on March 21, 2012553 Views

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Bridging the Gap – The Chronicle-Journal

Bridging the gap

Special to The Chronicle-Journal
Wednesday, March 21, 2012
By Doug Diaczuk

The way to create better relations between aboriginal and non-aboriginal people in Thunder Bay is by providing more opportunities through education.

A panel of political leaders and aboriginal strategists agree that not only will education provide aboriginal youth with more experience and training, it will help maintain cultural understanding and connections to traditional teachings.

On Tuesday, the Ken Morrison Lecture series presented Aboriginal and Non-Aboriginal Relations in Thunder Bay: Our Shared Future.

Read more: http://www.chroniclejournal.com/content/news/local/2012/03/21/bridging-gap

by NationTalk on March 21, 2012743 Views

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First Nation Artifact Now Returned to B.C. – Postmedia News

First Nation artifact now returned to B.C.

Nuu-chah-nulth club was given to Capt. James Cook in 1778

BY SUZANNE FOURNIER, POSTMEDIA NEWS MARCH 21, 2012

A ceremonial yew-wood club has come home to British Columbia, more than two centuries after it was carved by a Mowachaht-Muchalaht First Nation artisan and then given to Capt. James Cook in 1778.

Philanthropist Michael Audain, 74, said he “can now relax,” knowing the $1.2-million artifact of “global historical and cultural significance,” is no longer in his locked office drawer but at the University of B.C.’s Museum of Anthropology.

At a Tuesday morning ceremony attended by MowachachtMuchalaht elder Margarita James, the club was accepted by the MOA, where it will be displayed.

Read more: http://www.canada.com/First+Nation+artifact+returned/6334787/story.html

by NationTalk on March 21, 2012501 Views

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Category Supposed to be About the Music – Ottawa Citizen

Category supposed to be about the music

But does award for aboriginal album promote or pigeonhole First Nations culture?

By Patrick Langston, Ottawa Citizen March 21, 2012

There’s a nominee who’s a straight-up country musician. There’s a bluesman. And a duo that blends traditional powwow music with decidedly non-First- Nations house music.

So what exactly makes an act eligible for the Junos’ Aboriginal Recording of the Year category? And considering the history of native peoples in Canada, is having such a category perpetuating apartness?

“It’s not a racial category, it’s a musical category,” says Brian Wright-McLeod, a Dakota-Anishnabe and chair of the Junos’ aboriginal category. Eligible styles include all traditional forms, hand drums and traditional flutes, Inuit throat singing, and Métis and other fiddling. Also eligible are fusions of all genres of contemporary music that incorporate the eligible styles and/or reflect the aboriginal experience in Canada through words or music. And 50 per cent of an album’s listening time has to meet the above criteria. The judges are First Nations people involved in music, arts and culture.

Read more: http://www.ottawacitizen.com/entertainment/Category+supposed+about+music/6333559/story.html#ixzz1plcFUBLi

by NationTalk on March 21, 2012462 Views

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Engagement Crucial for Forum – Leader-Post

Engagement crucial for forum

BY KERRY BENJOE, LEADER-POST MARCH 21, 2012

The National Centre for First Nations Governance hopes Regina will be filled with people willing to share their ideas about First Nations governance.

Jocelyne Wasacase-Merasty, NCFNG prairies regional manager, said her organization is hosting a one-day forum in Regina on Tuesday.

“I’m trying to make it very open to First Nations people,” she said.

“When we talk about governance I think there is a movement that needs to be started.

Read more: http://www.leaderpost.com/life/Engagement+crucial+forum/6333848/story.html#ixzz1plbjtXR7

by NationTalk on March 21, 2012534 Views

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Massive Conference Brings Youth Together – Daily News

Massive conference brings youth together

BY TAMARA CUNNINGHAM, DAILY NEWS MARCH 21, 2012

Fifteen-year-old Valeen Jules fiddled with the pink headphones around her neck and smiled as she waited to register for the 10th annual Gathering Our Voices conference in Nanaimo.

“This is exciting for sure,” she said.

“I went to the one in Prince Rupert last year and everything about it was fun.”

Jules, a Nanaimo teen, is among 1,400 aboriginal youth who have converged on the Harbour City this week for the annual conference, packing restaurants, hotels and the longcriticized Vancouver Island Conference Centre.

Read more: http://www.canada.com/Massive+conference+brings+youth+together/6334770/story.html

by NationTalk on March 21, 2012585 Views

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Thriving Resource Sector Means First Nations Jobs, Minister Says – Calgary Herald

Thriving resource sector means First Nations jobs, minister says

By Mario Toneguzzi, Calgary Herald March 21, 2012

Canada’s aboriginal communities should be an integral part of future job creation, Calgary business leaders heard Tuesday.

John Duncan, federal Minister of Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development, told a chamber of commerce audience that a tightening labour market and growing natural resources sectors will bring opportunity for skilled native workers.

The First Nations population is expected to reach 1.5 million by 2026, Duncan said, with 40 per cent under the age of 25. Over the next five years, an estimated 155,000 native youths will reach working age, he said.

Read more: http://www.calgaryherald.com/business/Thriving+resource+sector+means+First+Nations+jobs+minister+says/6334494/story.html#ixzz1plbDOXfK

by NationTalk on March 21, 2012490 Views

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Ex-CEO Sues First Nation Over Dismissal – The Chronicle Herald

Ex-CEO sues First Nation over dismissal

March 21, 2012

Shubenacadie band now faces legal action from 2 former workers

The former chief executive officer for the Shubenacadie First Nation is suing the band.

In papers filed this month in Nova Scotia Supreme Court, Rick Simon alleges wrongful dismissal and says he is owed money.

Simon’s claim says he was hired and entered into what was to be a five-year contract with the band last May, effective April 1, 2011. The contract, said Simon, was to include access to the band council’s financial, client and personnel information as well as information related to Chief Jerry Sack and his personal business interests. He was also entitled to a $10,000 signing bonus, expenses related to his duties and a full range of benefits, including the pension plan.

Read more: http://thechronicleherald.ca/novascotia/75856-ex-ceo-sues-first-nation-over-dismissal

by NationTalk on March 21, 2012701 Views

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