S Mainstream Aboriginal Related News

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Teens sign up to learn dying language‎ – Victoria Times Colonist

Teens sign up to learn dying language

Course offered in Sencoten, spoken by Saanich Peninsula First Nation

By Katie Derosa, Times Colonist; With Files From Judith Lavoie June 12, 2012

A few years ago, only a dozen people could speak Sencoten, the dangerously dwindling language spoken by the Wsanec people of the Saanich Peninsula.

Stelly’s Secondary School is hoping the First Nations language will see a resurgence in September when the high school begins offering an elective class in Sencoten.

About 50 students have already signed up, mostly First Nations teens who are eager to preserve a part of their heritage that was stifled during the residential school era.

Read more: http://www.timescolonist.com/life/Teens+sign+learn+dying+language/6768070/story.html#ixzz1xcLGkA8r

by NationTalk on June 12, 2012462 Views

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Enbridge claims refuted‎ – Terrace Standard

Enbridge claims refuted

By Lauren Benn
Updated: June 12, 2012

TWO LOCAL First Nations say they haven’t signed any deals with Enbridge to take on an ownership stake in its planned Northern Gateway Pipelines project.

And Kitsumkalum chief councillor Don Roberts has called insulting an Enbridge claim that 60 per cent of the First Nations along the 1,170km pipeline route have signed on.

Roberts said Enbridge is trying to use First Nations’ constitutionally-enshrined rights and title as a way of bolstering its project.

“[Enbridge] has got to show where it’s coming from,” said Roberts, of what First Nations account for the 60 per cent statistic. “If Enbridge is wrong on those figures … it’s perjury.

Read more: http://www.terracestandard.com/news/158315855.html

by NationTalk on June 12, 2012502 Views

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Walter Cordery: Aboriginals should have say on hunting, fishing – Daily News

Walter Cordery: Aboriginals should have say on hunting, fishing

Walter Cordery, The Daily News
Published: Tuesday, June 12, 2012

Sometimes you have to wonder what the powers that be are thinking or if they actually do think.

Disregarded by most Canadians as our federal MPs debate the humongous budget document Bill C-38 was a recent announcement by Environment Minister Peter Kent that Ottawa was establishing a federal advisory panel to make recommendations on hunting and fishing regulations in the country.

Kent announced the national hunting and fishing advisory panel on May 30 at a National Fish and Wildlife Congress event in Ottawa that had been organized by the Ontario Federation of Anglers and Hunters.

Read more: http://www2.canada.com/nanaimodailynews/news/opinion/story.html?id=16979820-2ee7-4622-839f-7e18372b3d64

by NationTalk on June 12, 2012565 Views

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Research sheds light on ER mental health visits – U Alberta

Research sheds light on ER mental health visits

By Raquel Maurier
June 11, 2012

(Edmonton) Medical researchers from the University of Alberta who reviewed pediatric visits to emergency departments over six years discovered that those most apt to seek help for mental health concerns were First Nations children and kids from low-income families.

“These findings can help us ask more pointed questions in terms of what we can do for these children,” says Amanda Newton, the principal investigator of the research findings published June 11 in the Canadian Medical Association Journal.

“Why are these visit rates higher than for other children? And what can we do about it?” she says. “It does make you wonder what these children are not getting on a regular basis from the community, and what circumstances lead up to an emergency department visit.”

Read more: http://www.news.ualberta.ca/article.aspx?id=F0FDE9215FC84A56BA6B3F8992A2FE6B

by NationTalk on June 12, 2012429 Views

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Obesity, diabetes linked to food insecurity: report – Nunatsiaq Online

Obesity, diabetes linked to food insecurity: report

“We need important and strong actions taking place now”

June 12, 2012
DAVID MURPHY

The National Research Council of Canada is pleading for solutions to food insecurity and suggests better prenatal care to alleviate the growing problem of obesity and diabetes among Inuit children.

Its report, released last January, says Inuit children in Nunavut “are predominantly overweight or obese despite living in homes with food insecurity” and blames this on “readily available, energy-dense, highly processed foods in the Arctic.”

About one in two Inuit aged six to eight are obese, or 46 per cent, compared with eight per cent among Canada’s non-aboriginal population, according to a 2006 Statistics Canada aboriginal peoples survey.

Read more: http://www.nunatsiaqonline.ca/stories/article/65674obesity_diabetes_linked_to_food_insecurity_report/

by NationTalk on June 12, 2012464 Views

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Food fishery tangled in native net profits – BiV

Food fishery tangled in native net profits

BC Supreme Court lawsuit claims damages after band prevented from fishing for food in 2010 while other First Nations conducted commercial harvest

By Nelson Bennett
Tue Jun 12, 2012

Non-aboriginal fishermen aren’t the only ones who resent being kept off the water when First Nations are conducting a commercial fishery.

As a Matsqui First Nation BC Supreme Court civil suit filed against Canada illustrates, some First Nations are also kept off the water when a native commercial harvest is approved.

The suit underscores how Canada’s native fishing rights policies have been evolving ad hoc – driven more by litigation than legislation.

“The whole realm of public policy around who gets what in the take of the fisheries is what drives all this,” said Christina Burridge, executive director for the BC Seafood Alliance.

Read more: http://www.biv.com/article/20120612/BIV0104/120619993/food-fishery-tangled-in-native-net-profits

by NationTalk on June 12, 2012484 Views

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Regulate mining industry or expect more conflict, say leaders – Wawatay News

Regulate mining industry or expect more conflict, say leaders

Shawn Bell – Wawatay News
Tuesday June 12, 2012

First Nation leaders are criticizing the Ontario government’s new mining act, saying it puts too much faith in industry to “do the right thing” without adequate monitoring or regulations ensure meaningful consultation happens.

In a six-page letter to the Minister of Northern Development and Mines (MNDM), Nishnawbe Aski Nation (NAN) pointed out a range of flaws with phase two regulations, including concerns over the lack of compliance monitoring and enforcement.

“First Nations should not be asked to trust that companies will do the right thing,” NAN’s letter states. “There must be ongoing monitoring of all project sites, to ensure companies are properly motivated to comply with permit terms.”

Read more: http://www.wawataynews.ca/archive/all/2012/6/12/regulate-mining-industry-or-expect-more-conflict-say-leaders_22921

by NationTalk on June 12, 2012571 Views

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Budget cuts close door on guided tours of Louis Riel’s house – The Globe and Mail

Budget cuts close door on guided tours of Louis Riel’s house

PAUL WALDIE
Winnipeg — The Globe and Mail
Last updated Tuesday, Jun. 12 2012

Louis Riel is considered a Father of Confederation, founder of Manitoba and a significant figure in Canadian history. But his family home in Winnipeg is facing a more modern-day challenge – budget cuts.

The 131-year-old house has been owned by Parks Canada for nearly 50 years and is managed as a National Historic Site. For 30 years, the St. Boniface Historical Society provided guides in period costumes who gave tours of the house between May and September and explained the history of Riel.

Last month, the federal agency told the society that the contract, costing about $50,000 annually, was being terminated for budget cuts.

Read more: http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/politics/budget-cuts-close-door-on-guided-tours-of-louis-riels-house/article4249783/

by NationTalk on June 12, 2012427 Views

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Former PM urges grads to lead progress – U Alberta

Former PM urges grads to lead progress

By Jamie Hanlon
June 12, 2012

(Edmonton) The Right Honourable Paul Martin knows a thing or two about budgets. The former prime minister was the Liberal finance minister throughout most of the ‘90s and was responsible for balancing the federal budget after several years of deficits.

Martin’s address to the graduating students of the faculties of education and native studies touched on deficits of a different variety. Martin noted that when he was advised of his honorary doctor of laws degree from the University of Alberta, he asked to speak expressly to this group because of the mutual importance of their future paths.

“I believe your two graduating classes, in so many ways, hold the future of Canada in your hands,” he said. “Let there be no doubt that you will be the catalysts for your country’s progress.”

Recalling a previous visit, Martin touched on a conversation with a group of students from the Faculty of Native Studies and one question posed to him regarding why Canadians still seem to lack understanding of issues that face First Nations peoples. He explained that the reflection of the issues the question holds reveals a fatal flaw in the way Canadians view their history while eliminating the history of the land before the arrival of the Europeans. To truly know ourselves and our country in context, he said, we need to know our history, not the assimilated view that is taught in schools.

Read more: http://www.news.ualberta.ca/article.aspx?id=81FD84F60C284F36BA60208144263CFA

by NationTalk on June 12, 2012449 Views

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First Nation wants to slow the pace of mining activities – CBC

First Nation wants to slow the pace of mining activities

Webequie residents say process needs to slow down so they can participate in Ring of Fire

CBC News Posted: Jun 11, 2012

A mining development in northern Ontario, dubbed the Ring of Fire, is expected to be one of the first tests of the federal government’s streamlined environmental assessment.

An American company, Cliffs Natural Resources, plans to open a chromite mine in the James Bay lowlands by 2015. Chromite is the main ingredient in stainless steel, and Ontario is said to a quarter of the world’s supply.

Both the provincial and federal governments are keen to see the development go ahead quickly, but the people who live on the Webequie First Nation — a community closest to the proposed mine — want a slower approach.

Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/thunder-bay/story/2012/06/11/tby-webequie-on-ring-of-fire.html

by NationTalk on June 12, 2012535 Views

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Four years later, Harper’s apology for residential schools rings hollow for many – Toronto Star

Four years later, Harper’s apology for residential schools rings hollow for many

Published On Mon Jun 11 2012

OTTAWA—Four years after Stephen Harper offered an unfettered apology to aboriginal peoples for residential schools, the prime minister is at a turning point in his relationship with First Nations, says National Chief Shawn Atleo.

Harper can either take major, collaborative action to erase the deep and lingering effects of a school system that separated 150,000 kids from their families, Atleo said, or he can persist in chipping away at policy with small, unilateral measures and making grandiose promises that amount to little else besides more procedures.

“We’re faced with a real moment of reckoning here,” Atleo said in an interview on the fourth anniversary of the apology.

“The rate and pace of change is too slow.”

Read more: http://www.thestar.com/news/canada/politics/article/1209529–four-years-later-harper-s-apology-for-residential-schools-rings-hollow-for-many

by NationTalk on June 11, 2012586 Views

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Marina Beadle in Court Today for Jordan’s Principle and First Nations Children – Media Co-op

Maurina Beadle in Court Today for Jordan’s Principle and First Nations Children

Precedent-setting trial takes place this week in Halifax

by MOIRA PETERS
JUNE 10, 2012

In a precedent-setting case taking place over the next two days in Halifax, Maurina Beadle and Pictou Landing First Nation are taking the Government of Canada to court over its failure to provide to Beadle’s son the same level of health care that a child living off-reserve would receive from the province of Nova Scotia.

Beadle, with the support of Philippa Pictou, Health Director for Pictou Landing First Nation, are invoking, for the first time in its history, Jordan’s Principle, a child-first policy passed unanimously in the House of Commons in 2007. The policy dictates that in the instance of a jurisdictional dispute over which level of government foots the bill for a First Nations child in need of medical care, the government first contacted must come up with the funds; any arguments over who ultimately pays for the child’s care are to be argued later.

Read more: http://halifax.mediacoop.ca/story/marina-beadle-court-tomorrow-jordans-principle-and-first-nations-children/11276

by NationTalk on June 11, 2012597 Views

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Prized native Canadian carvings sold at Paris auction – Vancouver Sun

Prized native Canadian carvings sold at Paris auction

By By Randy Boswell, Postmedia News June 11, 2012

A mysterious pair of wooden figures from 19th-century Canada — created by First Nations carvers on the B.C. coast, and originally obtained more than 100 years ago by an infamous American collector — was sold Monday for about $40,000 at a major sale of aboriginal art in France.

Titled Kwakiutl Figures, the objects are about 85 centimetres tall and depict two individuals squatting on thick, rectangular bases. Expected to sell for between $40,000 and $60,000 at a Christie’s auction of “African and Oceanic Art” in Paris, the sculptures had been described in the sale catalogue as symbols of spiritual power meant to protect their possessor and bring good fortune to warriors and hunters.

The figures came from one of the many “Kwakiutl” communities — today’s Kwakwaka’wakw First Nation — located at the northern end of Vancouver Island, and were acquired in the late 1800s or early 1900s by an unscrupulous American collector named D.F. Tozier.

Read more: http://www.canada.com/Prized+native+Canadian+carvings+sold+Paris+auction/6763294/story.html#ixzz1xWSBM3vZ

by NationTalk on June 11, 2012558 Views

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Campaigning Against Truth: Enbridge v. The Facts – Pacific Press

Campaigning Against Truth: Enbridge v. The Facts

Enbridge Ad Campaign Versus Stubborn Facts

by Peter Ewart l Opinion 250

Enbridge Inc. recently announced that it is launching a new $5 million ad campaign in the media to promote its Northern Gateway pipeline, which will extend from Alberta and across northern British Columbia to the Pacific coast.

The main slogan is: “It’s more than a pipeline. It’s a path to our future.” In that regard, the ads claim that Enbridge’s pipeline will create thousands of jobs across the country, provide billions of dollars to help Canadian communities, and be built to “world-class safety standards” that will “respect the terrain and wildlife.”

This current ad campaign is in addition to the millions of dollars that the company has already spent on ads promoting the pipeline. Just one example: glossy, expensive, multi-page ads in the Canadian magazine “The Walrus.” In one of these ads, a group of aboriginal children in sports clothing are depicted jumping for joy in a grassy field bordered by a grove of trees.

Read more: http://pacificfreepress.com/news/1/11840-campaigning-against-truth-enbridge-v-the-facts.html

by NationTalk on June 11, 2012532 Views

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Flawed Process, Flawed Project – Dominion Paper

Flawed Process, Flawed Project

Controversy flows on the Northern Gateway pipeline and Canada’s oil economy

JUNE 11, 2012
by TREVOR KEHOE

VANCOUVER—Since January, the federal Joint Review Panel (JRP) has been touring Alberta and BC, accepting public statements on the proposed Enbridge Northern Gateway project. The controversial pipeline would carry tar sands bitumen and chemical condensate from Alberta to the BC coast.

Although some observers are encouraged by the JRP and opportunity for open dialogue on the pipeline, many First Nations, legal experts and environmentalists say the review process and the project itself are deeply flawed.

“We think there’s significant problems with the way the federal government has carried out its consultation,” said Josh Paterson, legal counsel with West Coast Environmental Law.

Read more: http://www.dominionpaper.ca/articles/4513

by NationTalk on June 11, 2012755 Views

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Three Inuit among NAHO’s last batch of aboriginal role models – Nunatsiaq News

Three Inuit among NAHO’s last batch of aboriginal role models

Jesse Apsaktaun, Dina Koonoo and David Dupuis are among the 2012 role models

June 11, 2012

Hard worker, motivated, honest: that’s how the National Aboriginal Health Organization describes the 2012 aboriginal role model, Jesse Apsaktaun, 28, of Kugaaruk.

Born and raised in Kugaaruk, Apsaktaun graduated from the Nunavut Teacher Education Program, and, according to a NAHO biography, “has not let anything hold him back.”

Apsaktaun, who now works as an adult educator at Nunavut Arctic College, also finds time to sit on committees for various cultural activities, such as teaching people how to build kayaks.

Read more: http://www.nunatsiaqonline.ca/stories/article/65674three_inuit_among_nahos_last_batch_of_aboriginal_role_models/

by NationTalk on June 11, 2012490 Views

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BC Treaty Advocate Elected Chair of UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues – Media Co-op

BC Treaty Advocate Elected Chair of UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues

Grand Chief Edward John has spent the past 20 years in the BC treaty process, which produces extinguishment Agreements

by KERRY COAST
JUNE 10, 2012

The 11th Session of the top forum for Indigenous peoples in the world began with a lurch. The sixteen-member Forum elected, by acclamation, Grand Chief Edward John to be their Chair. The announcement was made during a preliminary meeting, May 6, 2012, before the two week meeting in New York City. Hailing from Tl’azt’en (northern BC), this Chief will be familiar to anyone who has followed the machinations of the BC treaty process over the last twenty years: John was the founding Chair of the First Nations Summit, an organization formed to “represent First Nations” involved with the BC Treaty Commission (BCTC).

Perhaps, in 1992, the election of a man affiliated with this Summit to Chair the Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues – understood to be advancing the cause of self-determination, land rights, and everything else contained in the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, would not be an obvious contradiction in terms. However, twenty years later, after the ratification of two extinguishment treaties in that process, this election must be a point of confusion.

Read more: http://vancouver.mediacoop.ca/story/bc-treaty-advocate-elected-chair-un-permanent-forum-indigenous-issues/11269

by NationTalk on June 11, 2012428 Views

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Program offers first nations jobs in mining sector – for now – Vancouver Sun

Program offers first nations jobs in mining sector – for now

By DARAH HANSEN, Vancouver Sun June 11, 2012

Katy Gottfriedson found herself at loose ends last year, wondering where she wanted to go in life and contemplating the kind of work she wanted to pursue.

The 24-year-old member of the Kamloops Indian Band had taken a break from studying economics at Thompson Rivers University and had moved to Edmonton to work as a real estate agent.

She knew she wanted to finish her degree, but was totally uncertain of the career path she wanted to take.

“I was up in the air for sure,” Gottfriedson said.

Read more: http://www.vancouversun.com/business/2035/Program+offers+first+nations+jobs+mining+sector/6760534/story.html#ixzz1xWMHNa1Z

by NationTalk on June 11, 2012452 Views

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London man receives National Aboriginal Role Model honours – London Community News

London man receives National Aboriginal Role Model honours

Monday, June, 11, 2012

The National Aboriginal Health Organization (NAHO) announced its 12 new National Aboriginal Role Models for 2012, including Pernell Jones-Kegadonse of London.

The National Aboriginal Role Model Program (NARMP) was created in 2004 to celebrate the accomplishments of First Nations, Inuit and Métis youth aged 13 to 30. Since then, NARMP has chosen 96 youth who have stood out for their innovation, achievement and leadership.

“Each of these role models is uniquely worthy of this accomplishment,” said NAHO’s acting CEO Simon Brascoupé in a news release. “These 12 role models are great ambassadors of not only NARMP and NAHO, but First Nations, Inuit and Métis. This program has been a tremendous success over the years due to youth like these.”

Read more: http://www.londoncommunitynews.com/2012/06/london-man-receives-national-aboriginal-role-model-honours/

by NationTalk on June 11, 2012467 Views

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Scott Brison: If Canada doesn’t tackle income disparity, the economy will suffer – National Post

Scott Brison: If Canada doesn’t tackle income disparity, the economy will suffer

Scott Brison, National Post Jun 11, 2012

A poll reported in the National Post recently found that more than three-quarters of Canadians believe income inequality is a problem in Canada. I recently introduced a private members motion (M-315) in parliament which asks the finance committee to undertake a study on income inequality in the country. I believe that income inequality and growing inequality of opportunity have become important economic issues for Canada that represent significant threats to the country’s economy and society.

Members of Parliament shouldn’t make this a right- or left-wing issue. Mark Cameron, a Conservative and former director of policy for Prime Minister Harper, said that income inequality should concern not only social democrats or liberals but also conservatives who are concerned about maintaining public support for free markets and limited government. American Nobel Prize winning economist Joe Stiglitz says “growing inequality is the flip side of something else: shrinking opportunity.”

Read more: http://fullcomment.nationalpost.com/2012/06/11/scott-brison-if-canada-doesnt-tackle-income-disparity-the-economy-will-suffer/

by NationTalk on June 11, 2012452 Views

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City events lead up to National Aboriginal Day on June 21 – 680 News

City events lead up to National Aboriginal Day on June 21

680News staff Jun 11, 2012

TORONTO, Ont. – The 18th annual National Aboriginal Day will be celebrated across Canada on June 21.

In Toronto, the city and the Toronto Aboriginal City Celebration Committee are hosting related events June 12-30.

Click here for a list of events.

Read more: http://www.680news.com/news/local/article/371978–city-events-lead-up-to-national-aboriginal-day-on-june-21

by NationTalk on June 11, 2012502 Views

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Locals urge Harper to support First Nations – Terrace Standard

Locals urge Harper to support First Nations

Published: June 11, 2012

SOCIAL WORKERS gathered at the George Little Park band shell today to sign letters to Prime Minister Stephen Harper asking him not to cut the budgets of national aboriginal organizations.

Those organizations are a key part of repairing the effects of residential schools, says Rob Hart, the president of the BC Association of Social Workers’ northwest branch and the organizer of the letter signings.

“The Harper government has apologized for residential schools but they have not worked with aboriginal people to address the tremendous personal and social damage created by them,” he said.

Read more: http://www.terracestandard.com/news/158315605.html

by NationTalk on June 11, 2012435 Views

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Gitxsan blockade coming to an end as forensic audit begins – Globe and Mail

Gitxsan blockade coming to an end as forensic audit begins

WENDY STUECK AND IAN BAILEY
VANCOUVER — The Globe and Mail
Published Sunday, Jun. 10 2012

A blockade of the Gitxsan Treaty Society office in Old Hazelton in Northern B.C. will be dismantled Monday when federal officials arrive to launch a forensic audit into the society’s affairs.

Protesters who have been on the site since early December have been demanding such an audit, alleging the society has borrowed as much as $20-million for treaty negotiations over more than a decade with little or no tangible benefits for the Gitxsan.

Officials from Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada, along with accountants, are expected to be on the scene Monday, when the long-running blockade will be dismantled.

“It is happening at 9 o’clock in the morning,” said Norm Stephens, a lead protester. “That’s when we will take the blockade down. We’ve wanted a forensic audit all along. That was our goal.

Read more: http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/british-columbia/gitxsan-blockade-coming-to-an-end-as-forensic-audit-begins/article4246337/

by NationTalk on June 11, 2012442 Views

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Aboriginal representation at the Supreme Court – Toronto Star

Aboriginal representation at the Supreme Court

Published On Sat Jun 09 2012

Renewed debate over the judicial selection process is expected in light of Justice Marie Deschamps’ recent announcement that she will retire from the Supreme Court of Canada at the end of the summer. In constitutional democracies such as Canada, where judges weigh in on important social and moral questions and have the power to strike down legislation, the legitimacy of courts tends to correspond with a judiciary that reflects the composition of the people. Yet surveys demonstrate that the federal government has almost exclusively appointed white judges in recent years.

Changes to the composition of the judiciary typically occur at a glacial pace because of judicial tenure and limited diversity in the pool of qualified candidates. While all Canadian courts currently fail to reflect the population, some advances have been made, particularly at the Supreme Court where the bench is comprised of five men and four women (being much more gender representative compared with the Supreme Court of the United Kingdom where there are eleven men and one woman).

Read more: http://www.thestar.com/opinion/editorialopinion/article/1208693–aboriginal-representation-at-the-supreme-court

by NationTalk on June 11, 2012499 Views

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First Nation gets into housing business – Sault Star

First Nation gets into housing business

By Brian Kelly,The Sault Star

Missanabie Cree First Nation is building its economic base with help from a new home construction business.

Maple Leaf Homes and Building Products, based on Highway 17B in Echo Bay, will construct modular homes, do renovations and build kitchen cabinets, windows and doors for aboriginal and other markets.

Up to 10 jobs will be created initially with another 10 to 15 to follow, said Chief Kim Rainville.

The business was purchased from Maple Leaf Forest Products. Royal Bank and a private partner have invested slightly more than $2 million in the venture.

Read more: http://www.saultstar.com/ArticleDisplay.aspx?e=3581897

by NationTalk on June 11, 2012672 Views

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First Nations to buy prime Victoria waterfront land after toxin cleanup – Vancouver Sun

First Nations to buy prime Victoria waterfront land after toxin cleanup

Site at Rock Bay could become major development

By Rob Shaw, Times Colonist June 9, 2012

The federal government has sold prime waterfront land in Victoria’s harbour to two local First Nations, the first step toward what could one day be a bustling downtown development.

Transport Canada announced Friday it had an agreement to sell three chunks of property, totalling 1.71 hectares, in Rock Bay to the Songhees and Esquimalt First Nations for about $2.8 million.

The land includes Barclay Point – the tip of the Upper Harbour at the north end of Store Street – as well as the waterfront shoreline in Rock Bay behind businesses on Government Street, near Pembroke Street.

“The two nations came from the Inner Harbour and this is a chance to make themselves visible in the Inner Harbour again,” said Bob Mason, who handles economic development for both bands.

Read more: http://www.timescolonist.com/news/First+Nations+prime+Victoria+waterfront+land+after+toxin+cleanup/6757060/story.html#ixzz1xWHcOa4T

by NationTalk on June 11, 2012674 Views

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NS salmon angling plan still bothers native leaders – TheChronicleHerald.ca

N.S. salmon angling plan still bothers native leaders

June 9, 2012

After a one-week delay, the Atlantic salmon angling season in Nova Scotia began Friday.

The start was postponed due to a disagreement between native leaders in the province and Ottawa over a salmon management plan.

Aboriginal chiefs still aren’t happy with the way they say Fisheries and Oceans Canada considered their proposal, a release said.

“DFO has ignored the recommendations of the Mi’kmaq,” said Chief Terrance Paul, co-chairman of the Assembly of Nova Scotia Mi’kmaq Chiefs.

“We want to ensure that there are salmon in our rivers for future generations.”

Crystal Dorey, communications officer for the Mi’kmaq Rights Initiative, told The Chronicle Herald that significant flaws were found in the department’s plans.

Read more: http://thechronicleherald.ca/novascotia/105336-ns-salmon-angling-plan-still-bothers-native-leaders

by NationTalk on June 11, 2012504 Views

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Aboriginal art provides good medicine for hospital gallery – Winnipeg Free Press

Aboriginal art provides good medicine for hospital gallery

By: Alison Mayes
Posted: 06/9/2012

When Jackson Beardy was a little boy in Manitoba’s Garden Hill First Nation in the 1940s, he learned the traditional myths and legends of the Oji-Cree people from his grandmother.

At age seven, he was taken away to a culture-negating residential school.

By his 20s, he was lost and troubled. But Beardy found his healing path through art. He went back to his community, re-learned sacred stories from the elders, and began to give them visual form.

“He started to depict these stories in his very bold style,” says curator Leona Herzog.

In 1973, Beardy was a founding member of the Professional Native Indian Artists Incorporation, better known as the Indian Group of Seven. The famous group had a profound influence on aboriginal art being exhibited and valued across Canada.

Read more: http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/arts-and-life/entertainment/arts/aboriginal-art-provides-good-medicine-for-hospital-gallery-158289135.html

by NationTalk on June 11, 2012455 Views

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Young aboriginals conquer the odds – Vancouver Sun

Young aboriginals conquer the odds

Just 32 per cent of first nations students complete high school, compared with 80 per cent overall. On Thursday night, the graduates celebrated their achievements at a special ceremony

By Doug Ward, Vancouver Sun June 9, 2012

A lone ceremonial drummer from the Squamish Nation named Latash Kinem banged his drum slowly Thursday night, leading 80 students into the annual ceremony staged by the Vancouver school board for its aboriginal graduates.

Latash Kinem strode to the podium at Templeton secondary and in his traditional language told the first nations graduates: “Seek your power. Find your gifts.” Standing behind him were members of three generations of his own family, the large extended Nah-anee clan from the Squamish Nation, including his niece Senaqwila Wyss, one of two valedictorians at the Aboriginal Achievement Celebration.

After the graduates walked across the stage and received their awards, Senaqwila, whose given name means “sunlight dancing on the water,” rose to speak for her class of 2012.

Read more: http://www.vancouversun.com/technology/Young+aboriginals+conquer+odds/6756860/story.html#ixzz1xWGPA2r7

by NationTalk on June 11, 2012516 Views

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Inuit organize widespread protest over hunger, food cost – CTV

Inuit organize widespread protest over hunger, food cost

The Associated Press
Date: Friday Jun. 8, 2012

IQALUIT, Nunavut — Inuit in Nunavut are organizing a widespread protest Saturday to draw attention to shocking food prices that many say are adding to high levels of hunger in the territory.

Protesters are expected to rally outside grocery stores in communities across Nunavut to draw attention to the difficulty of feeding a family when a small bag of apples can cost $15.

It’s an unprecedented display of concern and frustration in the territory.

Read more: http://www.ctv.ca/CTVNews/Canada/20120608/inuit-food-prices-protest-120608/#ixzz1xEwuBZL8

by NationTalk on June 8, 2012738 Views

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Students tested for HIV after faulty diabetes screening – CTV

Students tested for HIV after faulty diabetes screening

The Associated Press
Date: Friday Jun. 8, 2012

WINNIPEG — Dozens of students and staff at a First Nations high school in Winnipeg are being tested for HIV and hepatitis after undergoing a faulty diabetes screening.

A University of Manitoba professor talked to students at Southeast Collegiate on May 4th about diabetes.

He used a glucometer to test blood-sugar levels on about 80 people.

Read more: http://www.ctv.ca/CTVNews/Canada/20120608/manitoba-students-tested-for-hiv-after-diabetes-screening-120608/#ixzz1xEwVIYdP for HIV after faulty diabetes screening

by NationTalk on June 8, 2012672 Views

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Aboriginal television program moving out of Sask – News Talk 980

Aboriginal television program moving out of Sask

Wapos Bay says goodbye after the loss of the film employment tax credit

Reported by Stephanie Froese
First Posted: Jun 8, 2012

It seems the province’s kyboshed Film Employment Tax Credit is forcing some quality aboriginal programming to operate out of province.

For the past 6 years Dennis Jackson has been making the stop-motion-animation show Wapos Bay loosely based on his life in Sandy Bay, Saskatchewan.

Both Jackson and the show have found success operating in province winning various awards and airing on the Aboriginal Peoples Television Network.

“We are basically servants of the province. We do our job and it brings money to the province,” said Jackson.

Read more: http://cjme.com/story/aboriginal-television-program-moving-out-sask/60379

by NationTalk on June 8, 2012608 Views

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Former Hupacasath chief named aboriginal economic development chair at UVic – Victoria Times Colonist

Former Hupacasath chief named aboriginal economic development chair at UVic

TIMES COLONIST JUNE 8, 2012

The former chief of Port Alberni’s Hupacasath First Nation has been appointed national aboriginal economic development chair at the University of Victoria.

Judith Sayers, an assistant professor at UVic, will continue to teach in the faculty of law and the Gustavson School of Business.

Sayers’ appointment runs until April 30, 2013. She will continue initiatives started by the inaugural chair, James Hopkins, and host a symposium in fall.

“This appointment is a great opportunity for me to explore more ways to engage aboriginal communities – particularly aboriginal youth – in entrepreneurship and economic development activities,” Sayers said in a statement.

Read more: http://www.timescolonist.com/business/Former+Hupacasath+chief+named+aboriginal+economic+development+chair+UVic/6750598/story.html#ixzz1xD5xZ9re

by NationTalk on June 8, 2012512 Views

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John Ivison: Workfare can do for First Nations what it did for Mike Harris … – National Post

John Ivison: Workfare can do for First Nations what it did for Mike Harris’ Ontario

John Ivison Jun 7, 2012

Workfare has an image problem. It conjures up Dickensian visions of young people being forced down mines. No wonder native leaders in southern Ontario and the Maritimes expressed their concern to Assembly of First Nations National Chief Shawn Atleo this week, after the National Post reported that the Harper government is keen to usher in a cultural shift to prevent young aboriginals from graduating from high school to welfare rolls.

In provinces like Saskatchewan, where the unemployment rate is 4.9%, 48.1% of native on reserve are on income assistance. The government is quiet on exactly what is being planned but sources suggest that young First Nation band members will in future have to commit to undertake training in return for a welfare cheque.

The roll-out of such a program is likely to face resistance from First Nations, unless they can be persuaded workfare works.

Read more: http://fullcomment.nationalpost.com/2012/06/07/john-ivison-workfare-can-do-for-first-nations-what-it-did-for-mike-harris-ontario/

by NationTalk on June 8, 2012628 Views

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Nunavut Leaders Send Congrats to New ITK President – Nunatsiaq Online

Nunavut leaders send congrats to new ITK president

“I am pleased that a fellow Nunavummiuq will be working to advance the interests of Inuit across Canada and throughout the world”

Nunavut June 08, 2012

Nunavut leaders sent their congratulations to Terry Audla June 7, the day following his election as president of Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami.

Premier Eva Aariak said in a statement that, with more than 17 years with the Qikiqtani Inuit Association and more than a year as chief executive officer of Nunavut Tunngavik Inc., Terry has proven himself as an experienced, thoughtful and hard-working leader. ITK represents Inuit nationally and internationally and I am pleased that a fellow Nunavummiuq will be working to advance the interests of Inuit across Canada and throughout the world. I wish Terry the best of luck in his new position and look forward to working with him on Inuit issues.”

Read more: http://www.nunatsiaqonline.ca/stories/article/65674nunavut_leaders_send_congrats_to_new_itk_president/

by NationTalk on June 8, 2012544 Views

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Gitxsan Insists Enbridge Deal Never Had its Support – The Globe and Mail

Gitxsan insists Enbridge deal never had its support

WENDY STUECK
VANCOUVER — The Globe and Mail
Last updated Friday, Jun. 08 2012

The Gitxsan First Nation has rejected a deal to take an equity stake in the controversial Northern Gateway pipeline, a spokeswoman for the Gitxsan Treaty Society insisted this week.

“The chiefs rejected the Enbridge agreement on Jan. 17, after several meetings and discussion,” Beverley Clifton Percival, a negotiator with the Gitxsan Treaty Society, said in an interview.

“They stepped away from the agreement. Enbridge knows that. We have not had any contact from Enbridge since that time and the chiefs’ direction has not changed.”

According to Enbridge, however, the Gitxsan deal remains in place, part of growing aboriginal support for the $5.5-billion, twin-pipeline project.

Read more: http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/british-columbia/gitxsan-insists-enbridge-deal-never-had-its-support/article4240937/?cmpid=rss1

by NationTalk on June 8, 2012624 Views

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Lots of Fun and Games Planned for Aboriginal Day – The Grove Examiner

Lots of fun and games planned for Aboriginal Day

STONY PLAIN – By Brandi Morin

During the month of June communities across Canada will be celebrating Aboriginal people and culture. On Friday, June 15, the 13th annual Aboriginal Day celebration is happening at the Heritage Pavilion in Stony Plain.

A number of partners are joining together to host the event including Parkland County, Town of Stony Plain, Alberta Parenting for the Future, Aboriginal Parent Link Center, McMan, Alberta Health Services, Paul First Nation Administration, Paul First Nation Health & Community Wellness, Alexander First Nation, Native Counselling Services of Alberta, Edmonton and Area Child and Family Services Authority.

Aboriginal Day is open to the public and organizers are predicting that they will see more than 2,000 people attend including local schools.

Read more: http://www.sprucegroveexaminer.com/ArticleDisplay.aspx?e=3580599

by NationTalk on June 8, 2012620 Views

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Aboriginal Workforce Face of the Future – Daily Herald Tribune

Aboriginal workforce face of the future

Report points to First Nations youth as untapped labour pool

By Graeme Bruce Herald-Tribune staff

Peace Country aboriginal people will play a large part in the future economic growth of industry.

This is based on a report released by BMO Bank of Montreal, which suggests the country’s aboriginal youth have the ability to quench the need for labour in the country.

Grande Prairie Friendship Centre executive director Kelly Benning agrees, but two major hurdles must be overcome: Lack of education and generations-old stereotypes.

Read more: http://www.dailyheraldtribune.com/ArticleDisplay.aspx?e=3580953

by NationTalk on June 8, 2012701 Views

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Nearly 50 youth acknowledged – Wawatay News

Nearly 50 youth acknowledged

Thursday June 7, 2012
Lenny Carpenter — Wawatay News

It is important to recognize what young Aboriginal people are doing in the community, said Sharon Smith-Baxter.

“There’s so much going and having so much positive stories about the challenges they overcame and how they’ve faced adversity and how they did with it, what they’re doing with their art and culture,” she said. “So many students are shy and acknowledging them makes a huge difference not only those students but for people watching and admiring them.”

On May 17, nearly 50 youth were recognized at the Northwestern Ontario Aboriginal Youth Achievement and Recognition Awards 2012 in Thunder Bay.

Read more: http://www.wawataynews.ca/archive/all/2012/6/7/nearly-50-youth-acknowledged-awards_22916

by NationTalk on June 7, 2012807 Views

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Funding crunch to close BC Aboriginal Mine Training Association – BIV

Funding crunch to close BC Aboriginal Mine Training Association

Jenny Wagler
Thu Jun 7, 2012

The BC Aboriginal Mine Training Association (BC AMTA) will close its doors June 15 unless it can secure 11th-hour funding to support its operations.

The organization supplies has been supplying job-ready candidates to B.C.’s mining sector for two and a half years. In a statement, BC AMTA’s executive director Laurie Sterritt said that the organization had an original goal to place 148 people in jobs.

“Through hard work and a passionate commitment to our mandate, we doubled that and today, more than 310 aboriginal men and women have found sustainable employment through their participation in BC AMTA skills training programs.”

Read more: http://www.biv.com/article/20120607/BIV0108/120609966/funding-crunch-to-close-bc-aboriginal-mine-training-association

by NationTalk on June 7, 20121097 Views

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Storytelling at ONECA conference – Wawatay News

Storytelling at ONECA conference

Thursday June 7, 2012
Rick Garrick — Wawatay News

Brenda Mason’s stories about working with students with mental illness were a hit during the Ontario Native Education Counsellors Association’s 28th Annual Conference.

“Her format was storytelling and the oral traditions that she brought from her childhood that she heard from her grandparents and so on,” said Roger Chum, an Aboriginal learning unit counsellor at Canadore College and Moose Cree band member. “And applying that to the four models of the medicine wheel, the physical, mental, spiritual and emotional.”

Chum said Mason’s presentation on Strategies for Supporting Students with Mental Illness was “so touching because it was so simple.”

“It’s the way our people work with each other; we look at it in a holistic sense,” Chum said.

Read more: http://www.wawataynews.ca/archive/all/2012/6/7/storytelling-oneca-conference_22915

by NationTalk on June 7, 2012966 Views

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Nearly 245 aboriginal students graduate from U of S – newstalk650.com

Nearly 245 aboriginal students graduate from U of S

Elder says this number is only going to increase with time

Reported by Trelle Burdeniuk
First Posted: Jun 6, 2012

Of the more than 3,000 students getting a degree from the University of Saskatchewan this week, 243 of them are aboriginal.

Those include record 10 aboriginal graduates from the Edwards School of Business.

Walter Linklater, an elder at the U of S Aboriginal Student Centre, felt this number will only increase, describing education as the new buffalo for aboriginal people.

“‘We cannot go back to traditional ways of hunting, fishing and trapping and living off the land anymore. Too many of our students are immigrating to the cities and becoming urban,” he said.

Read more: http://www.newstalk650.com/story/nearly-245-aboriginal-students-graduate-u-s/60048

by NationTalk on June 7, 2012504 Views

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Scugog Township proudly flies the flag of Mississaugas of Scugog Island – ‎ durhamregion.com

Scugog Township proudly flies the flag of Mississaugas of Scugog Island

Jun 07, 2012

The Township of Scugog took an important symbolic step — what took you so long? — last week in raising the flag of the Mississaugas of Scugog Island First Nation.

The flag-raising, led by Mayor Chuck Mercier, was an issue he wanted to address from his earliest days of assuming the chain of office after the last municipal election. It was celebrated last week outside the Township’s municipal offices and featured a traditional prayer and smudge ceremony conducted by elders from the Mississaugas of Scugog Island First Nation.

Though the Mississaugas have been neighbours, good neighbours, for generations, their presence in Scugog has never been officially recognized in this capacity. The Mississaugas’ flag now snaps smartly in the breeze alongside Scugog’s municipal flag, that of Ontario and Canada, and Durham Region’s flag.

Read more: http://www.durhamregion.com/opinion/editorial/article/1368575–scugog-township-proudly-flies-the-flag-of-mississaugas-of-scugog-island

by NationTalk on June 7, 2012689 Views

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New mortgage program opens doors for Tk’emlups band‎ – kamloopsnews.ca

New mortgage program opens doors for Tk’emlups band

JUNE 6, 2012
BY MICHELE YOUNG
DAILY NEWS STAFF REPORTER

The Tk’emlups Indian Band is the first in B.C. to sign on with a federal government program that makes it faster and easier to get a mortgage.

The band has spent two years finalizing the First Nation Market Housing Fund, which allows it to guarantee a loan without the approval of the Minister of Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development.

Scott Flamand, of Flamand Management Services, was at the reserve Wednesday to give a presentation on the fund.

In the past, it has taken aboriginals living on reserve six months to a year to get a mortgage approved. Now it’s a matter of days.

Read more: http://www.kamloopsnews.ca/article/20120606/KAMLOOPS0101/120609886/-1/kamloops01/new-mortgage-program-opens-doors-for-tk-8217-emlups-band

by NationTalk on June 7, 2012506 Views

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Paying for generations‎ – Ottawa Citizen

Paying for generations

The Ottawa Citizen June 6, 2012

A new report about the lingering effects of mercury poisoning on two first nations communities in northwestern Ontario offers a cautionary tale about the importance of closely monitoring and understanding what gets put into the environment.

Given plans to rewrite federal environmental protection legislation and the Fisheries Act, the tale could not be more timely.

In 1962, Dryden Chemical Company began operating a plant that produced chemicals for the pulp and paper industry. The company discharged its effluent directly into the Wabigoon-English river system. In 1970, mercury contamination was discovered which resulted in the closing of commercial fisheries and some tourist operations. In March of that year, the Ontario government ordered the company to stop dumping mercury.

Read more: http://www.ottawacitizen.com/news/Paying+generations/6740983/story.html#ixzz1x7le676h

by NationTalk on June 7, 2012556 Views

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Casino revenues, profits hit record‎ Regina – Leader-Post

Casino revenues, profits hit record

By Betty Ann Adam, StarPhoenix June 7, 2012

Saskatchewan Indian Gaming Authority (SIGA) casinos saw a 27 per cent increase in net earnings in 2011-12 with record revenues and profits.

The six First Nations-run casinos earned revenues of $267.2 million and profits of $81.6 million.

“Both of these figures are new record levels for our company,” said president and CEO Zane Hansen.

Saskatchewan’s strong economy, increasing population and a mild winter helped draw about four million visits to the casinos, Hansen said.

Dakota Dunes, at Dakota Whitecap First Nation near Saskatoon, was the highest grossing casino. Northern Lights casino in Prince Albert was the second-highest earner.

Read more: http://www.leaderpost.com/business/Casino+revenues+profits+record/6742602/story.html#ixzz1x7kIZ3Rl

by NationTalk on June 7, 2012664 Views

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FSIN questions consultation in Indian Act Bill, MP says communication is a two way street – News Talk 980

FSIN questions consultation in Indian Act Bill, MP says communication is a two way street

Reported by Stephanie Froese
First Posted: Jun 7, 2012

It came out of the blue according to Morley Watson, vice-chief of the Federation of Saskatchewan Indian Nations (FSIN).

That was his reaction after a private members bill to bring sweeping changes to the Indian Act was introduced to the House of Commons this week by Saskatchewan MP Rob Clark.

“Because of its infancy we have to sit down and have a good look at it,” said Watson.

“As long as we have first nation participation in it then it could be a good thing but it has to be handled properly,” he said.

Read more: http://cjme.com/story/fsin-questions-consultation-indian-act-bill-mp-says-communication-two-way-street/60159

by NationTalk on June 7, 2012612 Views

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HIV scare after faulty diabetes tests at First Nations school‎ – Globe and Mail

HIV scare at First Nations school after faulty diabetes tests

STEVE LAMBERT
WINNIPEG — The Canadian Press
Published Thursday, Jun. 07 2012

Dozens of students and staff at a First Nations high school are being tested for HIV and hepatitis after undergoing a faulty diabetes screening.

A University of Manitoba professor talked to students at Southeast Collegiate on May 4 about diabetes and used a pen-like device called a glucometer to test blood-sugar levels on about 80 people.

A university spokesman said the professor changed the device’s needle for each person, but failed to realize that the device itself is not supposed to be used on more than one person.

“The lancet, the needle-like poker which punctures the skin, was in fact changed after every use, and the skin was cleaned with alcohol,” John Danakas said Thursday.

Read more: http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/hiv-scare-after-faulty-diabetes-tests-at-first-nations-school/article4238617/

by NationTalk on June 7, 2012802 Views

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Breaking ground‎ – Lloydminster Source

Breaking ground

By Thomas Miller

Henry Lewis, the director of treaty governance in Onion Lake, said the work began 30 years ago.

On Tuesday he saw the culmination of those efforts as Onion Lake Cree Nation broke ground on the site of their potential Treaty No. 6 Embassy.

Earlier that day Onion Lake Cree Nation also entered into treaties with the Northwestern Band of the Shoshone Nation from Utah, and Sucker Creek First Nation, Ermineskin Cree Nation and Drift Pile Cree Nation, all from Alberta.

“With this in place now, we are providing the foundation for the unity that is lacking within Treaty 6 territory,” said Lewis after the ground breaking ceremony. “Chiefs can start working together, collectively as opposed to individually. That way we will be in a better position to get the government to start listening to our issues.”

Read more: http://www.lloydminstersource.com/News/tabid/68/entryid/2148/Default.aspx

by NationTalk on June 7, 2012673 Views

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Minister to discuss bringing higher education opportunities to West Coast‎ – The Westerly

Minister to discuss bringing higher education opportunities to West Coast

Andrew Bailey, Westerly News
Published: Thursday, June 07, 2012

The TofinoLong Beach Chamber of Commerce will wrap up its luncheon series this month with a focus on higher education.
Tofino’s Tin Wis resort will provide the setting for the June 11 noon luncheon, which will feature keynote speaker Naomi Yamamoto, B.C.’s Minister of Advanced Education.

“She’s going to use Tofino as her platform to talk about improving aboriginal access to post-secondary education and other issues and opportunities in post-secondary education,” says the chamber’s executive director Gord Johns.

“The reason she’s chosen here is because we’re so deep and rich in our region culturally and the relationships that we have are very unique in having eight communities working together in trying to bring higher learning into our region,” he adds.

Read more: http://www2.canada.com/westerly/news/story.html?id=96b8172e-273a-4152-ab7d-ebc2df57c33c

by NationTalk on June 7, 2012538 Views

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