S Mainstream Aboriginal Related News

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Canada to host top military leaders from Arctic nations‎ – Edmonton Journal

Canada to host top military leaders from Arctic nations

BY RANDY BOSWELL, POSTMEDIA NEWS APRIL 4, 2012

In stark contrast to simmering fears that a new Cold War is emerging between oil-hungry Arctic nations, Canada’s Chief of Defence Staff, Gen. Walter Natynczyk, is preparing to host his counterparts from seven other northern countries next week in Labrador for two days of talks on polar issues “of mutual interest,” Postmedia News has learned.

The planned gathering of the world’s top Arctic military officials – including the defence chiefs or senior northern commanders from Canada, the United States, Russia, Norway, Denmark, Sweden, Finland and Iceland – is scheduled to take place April 12-13 at Canadian Forces Base Goose Bay in Newfoundland and Labrador.

Details are still “in flux,” Natynczyk’s chief spokesman, Lt.-Cmdr. Kris Phillips, said Tuesday. But Canadian officials are planning for about 50 international visitors to arrive next Thursday at the Goose Bay airbase for discussions on Arctic search-and-rescue operations, northern environmental challenges, military-aboriginal relations and a range of other issues.

Read more: http://www.edmontonjournal.com/news/Canada+host+military+leaders+from+Arctic+nations/6407890/story.html

by NationTalk on April 4, 2012601 Views

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Greg Rickford MP – “Positive opportunities for First Nations …‎ Net Newsledger

Greg Rickford MP – “Positive opportunities for First Nations communities in the Economic Action Plan 2012″

NNL Staff on April 4, 2012.

OTTAWA – Kenora MP Greg Rickford say there are “Positive opportunities for First Nations communities in the Economic Action Plan 2012 tabled Thursday, March 29 in the House of Commons. Economic Action Plan 2012 takes concrete steps toward the shared objectives we have set through the joint action plan between the Minister of Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development and National Chief of Assembly of First Nations Atleo. It is also consistent with our shared priorities flowing from the First Nations Crown Gathering”.

“First Nations education is a priority for our government and our commitment to improving educational outcomes is demonstrated by the $275 million in new funding over the next three years to support literacy programs and other supports, as well as to fund the building and renovations of schools on reserve,” adds Rickford. “This builds on our government’s investment of more than $1.5 billion annually in First Nations education, the construction of 37 new schools and major renovations to 22 more in the past six years, and our ongoing partnerships to extend or launch programs to support First Nations students”.

Read more: http://netnewsledger.com/2012/04/04/greg-rickford-mp-positive-opportunities-for-first-nations-communities-in-the-economic-action-plan-2012/

by NationTalk on April 4, 2012529 Views

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A 7-Year-Old Aboriginal Girl’s Battle to Tell the Truth at School‎ – Huffington Post Canada

A 7-Year-Old Aboriginal Girl’s Battle to Tell the Truth at School

Posted: 04/ 3/2012

Ruby was seven years old and in Grade 2. She was to prepare a class presentation on a topic of her choice, and decided she wanted to tell the story of why she doesn’t speak her First Nations language.

Ruby wanted to share information about the effects Indian residential school had on her family and community in terms of language loss. This was a very important topic that meant a lot to her. She wanted everyone to know about how wrong Indian residential schools were.

Ruby and her father spoke to Ruby’s teacher to describe the intended presentation. The teacher suggested Ruby instead teach the class a few words in her language or about hunting or fishing. Ruby explained once more that she wanted to share the reasons why she doesn’t know much of her language. The teacher approved the project.

Read more: http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/chelsea-vowel/residential-schools-canada_b_1385022.html

by NationTalk on April 4, 2012802 Views

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Sinclair ‘infinitely more’ than body found by bin‎ – Winnipeg Free Press

Sinclair ‘infinitely more’ than body found by bin

By: Mary Agnes Welch

Carolyn Marie Sinclair, the 25-year-old whose body was found in a garbage bag near a Dumpster on the weekend, was more than a sex-trade worker.

The 150 friends, family and strangers who gathered Tuesday evening for a vigil — the kind that has become routine in Winnipeg — said the media and police have dismissed Sinclair as a prostitute when she was a mother, sister and daughter.

“She was infinitely more than where her life ended,” said Nahanni Fontaine, the provincial government’s special adviser on aboriginal women’s issues. “We blame her. We say she was a sex-trade worker.”

Read more: http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/local/sinclair-infinitely-more-than-body-found-by-bin-146060215.html

by NationTalk on April 4, 2012652 Views

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Funding dispute could shut Native Friendship Centre‎ – Montreal Gazette

Funding dispute could shut Native Friendship Centre of Montreal

‘There will be deaths. Homelessness will rise,’ warns president Eric Ravenelle as dispute leaves it without money to carry on

By ADAM KOVAC, Special to The Gazette April 4, 2012

MONTREAL – The Native Friendship Centre of Montreal, an institution that has served Montreal’s aboriginal community for 37 years, could be forced to close over a funding dispute.

The centre’s executive director, Brett Pineau, estimates funding will run out within three months.

The first casualty has already been announced: the Inter-Tribal Youth Centre of Montreal, which is housed in the centre’s building at St. Laurent Blvd. and Ontario St., will be shut down after March 30.

Read more: http://www.montrealgazette.com/news/Funding+dispute+could+shut+Native+Friendship+Centre+Montreal/6406844/story.html#ixzz1r4veCvOf

by NationTalk on April 4, 2012703 Views

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Langley MLA: Aboriginal agreement reached in principle‎ – Langley Advance News

Langley MLA: Aboriginal agreement reached in principle

LANGLEY ADVANCE APRIL 3, 2012

Dear Editor,

On March 24, I had the honour of joining representatives of the K’¢moks First Nation, federal minister John Duncan and other dignitaries to sign the K’¢moks First Nation’s Agreement-in-Principle.

It is a milestone for K’¢moks and provides a framework that will eventually be developed into a Final Agreement.

Treaties and non-treaty agreements generate jobs for families and provide opportunities for First Nations and non-First Nation communities alike. They bring certainty to the land base, facilitate investment and build economic independence for First Nations. The treaty will do for the K’¢moks people and surrounding communities what it is doing for those communities that have gone before K’¢moks.

Read more: http://www.langleyadvance.com/Langley+Aboriginal+agreement+reached+principle/6404051/story.html#ixzz1r4v2uurp

by NationTalk on April 4, 2012472 Views

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Native studies gains popularity – Windsor Star

Native studies gains popularity

By Sarah Sacheli, The Windsor Star April 4, 2012

Retired London, Ont., teacher Brenda Collins travels the province with boxes of glass tiles and bottles of glue, turning native studies into a work of art.

This week, she was at Leamington District secondary school where more than 80 students helped create two mosaics in the form of an aboriginal medicine wheel. One of the depictions of native culture will hang in the public school board headquarters in Windsor and the smaller one will be used by Leamington teacher Butch Rickeard to bring aboriginal studies to life in his classroom.

Rickeard, whose career began on a Northern Ontario reserve in Deer Lake, teaches one of the few courses in native studies offered at the Greater Essex County District School Board. As department head of social science at Leamington, he knows he needs at least nine students interested in taking the course every year to offer it. This year, he has 22.

Read more: http://www.windsorstar.com/technology/Native+studies+gains+popularity/6407583/story.html#ixzz1r4uezHv7

by NationTalk on April 4, 2012506 Views

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Missing women inquiry beset by ‘sexism’: Ex-staff‎ – National Post

Missing women inquiry beset by ‘sexism’: Ex-staff

Brian Hutchinson Apr 3, 2012

VANCOUVER — Employees of a high-profile public inquiry examining how police investigated cases of missing and murdered sex-trade workers say they encountered a “highly sexualized” workplace environment where male staff members made offensive comments about women and their bodies.

Five former commission staff members described to the National Post episodes of harassment, intimidation and conflict occurring behind closed doors at the Missing Women Commission of Inquiry, which was called by the B.C. government in 2010.

According to one former inquiry employee, a senior commission staff member made reference to a local sex-trade worker as “the fat hooker.” The same female prostitute had offered to assist the inquiry with its mandate, it is alleged. Similar remarks were made about the woman on other occasions, the source said.

Read more: http://news.nationalpost.com/2012/04/03/missing-women-inquiry-staff-claim-abuse-highly-sexualized-workplace/?__lsa=b2742d11

by NationTalk on April 4, 2012577 Views

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Call for more native policing met with mixed reviews‎ – CBC.ca

Call for more native policing met with mixed reviews

CBC News Posted: Apr 4, 2012

Some Manitoba First Nations leaders are applauding a call by aboriginal groups to replace the RCMP with on-reserve police forces, but others are skeptical.

The idea of increasing native policing resurfaced this week, as some Manitoba aboriginal groups are going to court over the issue of who provides police services.

The Assembly of Manitoba Chiefs (AMC) and two First Nations have filed an application for judicial review in the Federal Court and the Manitoba Court of Queen’s Bench.

The groups accuse the federal and provincial governments of not consulting with them before a new 20-year contract was signed with the RCMP to provide policing services.

Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/manitoba/story/2012/04/03/mb-first-nations-policing.html

by NationTalk on April 4, 2012563 Views

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Sandy Lake elects new chief – Wawatay News

Sandy Lake elects new chief

Tuesday April 3, 2012
Rick Garrick – Wawatay News

Newly elected Sandy Lake Chief Bart Meekis is looking to improve education and housing in his community.

“We want to become leaders in education, past the provincial level,” said Meekis, who won the election with 579 votes, 408 votes more than the next candidate. “We need to do something about our housing. Every year the demand is growing and growing and our allocation for houses seems to be getting smaller and smaller. We need our young people to have adequate housing.”

Read more: http://www.wawataynews.ca/archive/all/2012/4/3/sandy-lake-elects-new-chief_22616

by NationTalk on April 3, 2012996 Views

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Native women fight federal status policy – Winnipeg Free Press

Native women fight federal status policy

Denied rights due to lack of dad’s signature

By: Alexandra Paul
Posted: 04/2/2012

ABORIGINAL women across Canada are fighting a federal policy that denies tens of thousands of aboriginal children Indian status because their fathers failed to sign birth certificates.

Others only receive partial status — their Indian status benefits cannot be passed down to their children — and say the policy is a form of discrimination tied to paternity rights.

“It is most definitely discrimination, and the reason why is that it only impacts indigenous women,” said Pam Palmater, author of Beyond Blood and Rethinking Indigenous Identity.

To make matters worse, advocates such as Palmater say the policy isn’t a historical relic developed during an age when women were granted few official rights.

Read more: http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/local/native-women-fight-federal-status-policy-145725285.html

by NationTalk on April 3, 2012586 Views

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Picktons of world must not win, Oppal pleads – The Province

Picktons of world must not win, Oppal pleads

Deadline looms for controversial hearings

By Suzanne Fournier, The Province April 3, 2012

The Missing Women Commission of Inquiry began its final 20 days of hearings Monday with an appeal by commissioner Wally Oppal to his critics to set aside their objections “so that another monster cannot prey on vulnerable women.”

“We cannot let the Willy Picktons of the world triumph,” said Oppal, as the inquiry resumed after a three-week adjournment, due in part to the withdrawal of First Nations lawyer Robyn Gervais, who charged that aboriginal concerns were being ignored.

Oppal said he must “investigate how a serial killer was able to prey on our most vulnerable women for an extended period of time without being caught.”

Read more: http://www.theprovince.com/news/Picktons+world+must+Oppal+pleads/6402045/story.html#ixzz1qzWXsak9

by NationTalk on April 3, 2012506 Views

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Vigil being planned for slain woman – Winnipeg Free Press

Vigil being planned for slain woman

By: Aldo Santin
Posted: 04/2/2012

A vigil is tentatively planned Tuesday for Carolyn Marie Sinclair, who police identified as the woman found dead in a bag near a dumpster on the weekend.

Sinclair, 25, was a sex-trade worker who had been missing since mid-December.

Sinclair’s body was found in a garbage bag late Saturday morning near a dumpster in the back lane of an apartment building in the 700-block of Notre Dame Avenue.

Winnipeg police said members of the missing person unit had been actively looking for her as late as last week.

Read more: http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/breakingnews/Police-identify-body-found-in-garbage-bag-145797495.html

by NationTalk on April 3, 2012627 Views

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Young man’s hopes, dreams end in death – Winnipeg Free Press

Young man’s hopes, dreams end in death

Returned home to attend university

By: Mary Agnes Welch
Posted: 04/2/2012

He was movie-star handsome, with many friends and plans to attend university. But on Saturday, John Felix became the city’s ninth homicide of 2012.

Felix, 21, was found dead just inside the fence of a house at 238 Balmoral St. around 7:40 p.m. Saturday. Police didn’t remove his body until Sunday morning.

Police were mum on the details Sunday, refusing to say how Felix died, how long his body may have been lying in the yard or who found him.

Some passersby speculated Felix’s death may have been gang-related.

Read more: http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/local/young-mans-hopes-dreams-end-in-death-145725655.html

by NationTalk on April 3, 2012738 Views

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Feeling Left Out, Chiefs Go to Court – Winnipeg Free Press

Feeling left out, chiefs go to court

By: Mary Agnes Welch

MANITOBA’S First Nations will go to court today to stop a new 20-year deal to keep the Mounties in the province.

Led by the Assembly of Manitoba Chiefs, the First Nations say they were left out of negotiations between Ottawa and the province on the new RCMP operation-and-funding agreement signed Thursday.

“They certainly didn’t consult with me and my First Nation,” said Pine Creek Chief Charles Boucher. “We want a meaningful partnership.”

Boucher will join Grand Chief Derek Nepinak and others this morning for a press conference once their application has been filed in court. They will argue the new agreement should be postponed because Ottawa and the province “neglected to consult with First Nations in Manitoba in respect of the police services provided with respect to their traditional territories,” according to a news release.

Read more: http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/local/feeling-left-out-chiefs-go-to-court-145886385.html

by NationTalk on April 3, 2012539 Views

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First Nation Frustrated Over Shortened Pipeline Hearings – Postmedia News

First Nation frustrated over shortened pipeline hearings

By Mike Hager, Postmedia News April 3, 2012

The chief of the Heiltsuk First Nation says her people have been treated “disrespectfully” after the scheduled four days of hearings in Bella Bella, B.C., on Enbridge’s proposed Northern Gateway pipeline were shortened by more than one day.

“Our people are peaceful and respectful. It’s really disheartening to the community and very disrespectful to our people,” Chief Marilyn Slett said Monday.

Slett said the panel notified her Sunday that its airport reception resulted in a decision to cancel Monday’s hearings because it felt it was unable to “conduct the hearings in a safe and secure environment.”

Read more: http://www.calgaryherald.com/news/First+Nation+frustrated+over+shortened+pipeline+hearings/6401550/story.html#ixzz1qzSsCpoW

by NationTalk on April 3, 2012507 Views

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Native Housing Started in 2009 Almost Ready – CBC News

Native housing started in 2009 almost ready

CBC News Posted: Apr 3, 2012

Off-reserve housing for Natives, which received funding in January 2009, will be ready to open in May, says the Native Council of P.E.I.

The housing includes three modular duplexes on Turtle Lane just off Norwood Road in Charlottetown, designed to be short-term, transitional housing for aboriginal singles and families, and an eight-unit complex just down the road at Elena Court allows aboriginal seniors to live independently.

All four buildings have been sitting empty.

The Native Council of P.E.I. received more than $600,000 for the buildings through the P.E.I. government in January 2009. P.E.I. housing coordinator Bill Fleming said the projects have taken longer than the province would have liked, but delays in housing projects are not unusual.

Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/prince-edward-island/story/2012/04/03/pei-native-council-housing-584.html

by NationTalk on April 3, 2012533 Views

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First Nations Vets Pick Leader – The StarPhoenix

First Nations vets pick leader

BY JASON WARICK, THE STARPHOENIX APRIL 3, 2012

The Saskatchewan First Nation Veterans Association has elected a new grand chief.

Raymond Sanderson of the James Smith Cree Nation was elected during an annual general assembly held last week in Saskatoon at the White Buffalo Youth Lodge.

“I am honoured to have been elected by my fellow peers,” Sanderson said in a statement. “I am committed to working hard for my fellow veterans and widows. In these short few months we will focus our initial efforts on the grave marker program and a fundraising initiative for our members.”

Read more: http://www.thestarphoenix.com/news/First+Nations+vets+pick+leader/6401046/story.html#ixzz1qzS8I3x7

by NationTalk on April 3, 2012517 Views

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Aboriginal Pipeline Group Downsizing – Calgary Herald

Aboriginal Pipeline Group downsizing

Will wait for gas prices to recover

BY DINA O’MEARA, CALGARY HERALD APRIL 3, 2012

The Aboriginal Pipeline Group will be downsizing to a smaller office with fewer staff as it waits for natural gas prices to recover and the Mackenzie Valley pipeline dream to restart.

The group, which holds a 33 per cent stake in the Arctic gas project, remains committed to the pipeline but has to take a realistic view, said chair Fred Carmichael.

“We are not shutting down,” Carmichael said Monday. “We remain committed to work out a deal with the federal government. We are exploring other options to make this project economic, but until such time as the gas prices improve, we have to take some steps just to downsize, and that’s where we’re at.”

Read more: http://www.calgaryherald.com/business/Aboriginal+Pipeline+Group+downsizing/6401547/story.html#ixzz1qzRmhaKU

by NationTalk on April 3, 2012750 Views

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Tillicum Safe House Gets Funding Stability – Daily News

Tillicum safe house gets funding stability

BY DARRELL BELLAART, DAILY NEWS APRIL 3, 2012

Funding is now in place for a new youth safe house to operate through 2015.

Last week, the non-profit society that operates the Tillicum Lelum Friendship Centre got the news it hoped for from the federal government in the form of a three-year funding agreement to operate the program from the new building at 479 Tenth St.

The facility has been under construction since October, on the same acreage where an 18-unit youth and elder housing facility recently opened.

Read more: http://www.canada.com/Tillicum+safe+house+gets+funding+stability/6401613/story.html

by NationTalk on April 3, 2012577 Views

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Oppal calls for critics to join him in final weeks of Pickton inquiry – Winnipeg Free Press

Oppal calls for critics to join him in final weeks of Pickton inquiry

By: The Canadian Press

VANCOUVER – The head of a public inquiry into the Robert Pickton case is pleading with his critics to join him as hearings resume after a three-week break and a looming deadline for his June 30 report.

Commissioner Wally Oppal is leading an inquiry that’s been criticized by aboriginal organizations and other advocacy groups, which were denied funding to participate and have complained the inquiry is too focused on police.

The hearings are also facing a time crunch, with the report’s due date and hearings expected to end in May despite a witness list that still includes more than two dozen people.

Oppal says he understands concerns that the inquiry isn’t examining issues such as aboriginal colonization, but that he is bound by his mandate to focus on the police response to Pickton.

Read more: http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/canada/oppal-calls-for-critics-to-join-him-in-final-weeks-of-pickton-inquiry-145797835.html

by NationTalk on April 2, 2012438 Views

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Nunavut-specific video made for suicide prevention – CBC News

Nunavut-specific video made for suicide prevention

Video replaces generic film used during Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training courses

CBC News Posted: Mar 31, 2012

A suicide first aid course in Nunavut will now feature made-in-Nunavut video.

The new material replaces a generic film used during Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training, or ASIST. The course teaches people, through film and discussion, how to help someone who is suicidal.

“The core of the curriculum is unchanged, and it’s a curriculum that’s used around the world,” said Jack Hicks, an ASIST instructor in Iqaluit.

Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/north/story/2012/03/31/north-nunavut-asist-video.html

by NationTalk on April 2, 2012530 Views

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Native Friendship Centre faces closure – McGill Daily

Native Friendship Centre faces closure

Community plans to mobilize and lobby provincial government for funding

MADELEINE CUMMINGS
Published on March 31, 2012

The Native Friendship Centre of Montreal (NFCM) may be forced to close its doors in as little as three months if it cannot secure the necessary funding.

The NFCM is one of ten Native Friendship Centres in Quebec, and has existed for the past 37 years. There are 120 centres across Canada seeking to improve the quality of life for Aboriginal people living in urban areas.

The Montreal Centre offers its visitors health and social services, legal information, education and training, and employment opportunities.

Read more: http://www.mcgilldaily.com/2012/03/native-friendship-centre-faces-closure/

by NationTalk on April 2, 2012583 Views

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Aboriginal homelessness still a problem in Vancouver – news1130.com

Aboriginal homelessness still a problem in Vancouver

Group wants permanent Aboriginal shelter

Mike Lloyd Mar 31, 2012

VANCOUVER (NEWS1130) – As Vancouver continues to add up the totals after the annual homeless count earlier this week, the city feels the number of aboriginal people who live on the street is still a real challenge.

“We’re still seeing very disproportionately-high numbers of people of Aboriginal descent who are homeless in Vancouver,” says Mayor Gregor Robertson.

Susan Tatoosh is with the Vancouver Aboriginal Friendship Centre Society, which helps run the central shelter near the train station. “We have a transient population; always moving in and out of Vancouver. However, the urgency to continue the shelters where they are is important to the Aboriginal community.”

Read more: http://www.news1130.com/news/local/article/346923–aboriginal-homelessness-still-a-problem-in-vancouver

by NationTalk on April 2, 2012686 Views

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Yukon Native Hockey Tournament marks 35 years – CBC.ca

Yukon Native Hockey Tournament marks 35 years

42 teams from Yukon, B.C. and N.W.T. in Whitehorse this weekend

CBC News Posted: Mar 31, 2012

The Yukon Native Hockey Tournament, the largest hockey tournament in the Yukon, celebrates its 35th anniversary this weekend in Whitehorse.

Forty-two teams and more than 600 players from across Yukon, Northwest Territories and British Columbia, as well as their families and friends, have poured into the city.

Jeanie Dendys, vice-president of the Yukon Indian Hockey Association which organizes the tournament, said the weekend is as much about seeing old friends as it is about playing hockey.

Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/north/story/2012/03/31/north-whitehorse-hockey-tournament.html

by NationTalk on April 2, 2012911 Views

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Our home and vitally native land – Winnipeg Free Press

Our home and vitally native land

Magnificent aboriginal anthology adds to our understanding of Manitoba

Reviewed by: Neil Besner
Posted: 03/31/2012

Manitowapow
Aboriginal Writings from the Land of Water
Edited by Niigaanwewidam James Sinclair and Warren Cariou
Highwater Press, 416 pages, $35

Until the appearance of this beautiful volume, anthologies of Manitoba writing — and there are several excellent collections — have tended to represent aboriginal writers somewhat sporadically and selectively.

Manitowapow (the meanings and origins of the name are fully explained in the anthology’s excellent introduction) will fundamentally revise the ways in which the province’s literary, cultural and political history is read, by beginning to more fully restore and reconsider the fundamental significance of aboriginal writing to that history.

Read more: http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/opinion/fyi/our-home-and-vitally-native-land-145316935.html

by NationTalk on April 2, 2012708 Views

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Aboriginal Juno category casts a wide net – CBC.ca

Aboriginal Juno category casts a wide net

CBC News Posted: Mar 31, 2012

The nominees for Aboriginal Album of the Year at this year’s Junos in Ottawa are competing in a category that is evolving to encompass an increasingly diverse range of musical styles.

This year’s nominees include traditional drummer Randy Wood, bluesman Murray Porter and country artist Donny Parenteau, as well Ottawa-based Flying Down Thunder and Rise Ashen, who blend traditional vocals with modern electronic music, and Winnipeg rockers Bruthers of Different Muthers.

“This is the pinnacle of my music career, right here with these guys,” said Bruthers guitarist Jesse Green. “I play guitar for Buffy Ste. Marie. I play with these guys. What more could you ask for?”

Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/ottawa/story/2012/03/30/ottawa-juno-nominees-aboriginal-music.html

by NationTalk on April 2, 2012637 Views

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Aboriginal skill on display at annual tournament – Selkirk Journal

Aboriginal skill on display at annual tournament

Dozens of teams gather at MTS Iceplex in Winnipeg for memorial hockey tourney

By Brook Jones

Seventy hockey teams from around Manitoba and across Canada converged at the MTS Iceplex in Winnipeg from March 29 to April 1 for the Melvin Fontaine Memorial Recreation Hockey Tournament.

The annual tournament bears the name of Melvin Fontaine in honour of tournament organizer Kirby Fontaine’s father.

The memorial hockey tournament was first held Sagkeeng back in 2010 and for the past two years has taken place at the MTS Iceplex.

Read more: http://www.selkirkjournal.com/ArticleDisplay.aspx?e=3521984

by NationTalk on April 2, 2012707 Views

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Federal budget offers mixed bag for North – CBC.ca

Federal budget offers mixed bag for North

Money pledged for a harbour in Pangnirtung and for Health Canada posts while CanNor and Aboriginal Affairs face cuts

CBC News Posted: Mar 30, 2012

The federal budget, released Thursday in Ottawa, contains some of the biggest cross-country cuts since the 1990s.

Old age security eligibility will be raised to the age of 67, the penny will be phased out, and about 19,000 public sector jobs will be cut over the next three years.

The budget also includes several plans for the North.

Among the most notable plans is $225 million to repair harbours across the country. Included in that money is a plan to “accelerate” the construction of the harbour in Pangnirtung, Nunavut, which was originally announced in 2009.

Also included in the budget is the continuation of an assessment of diamonds in the North – with a price tag of $12.3 million over two years. The plan will renew the Diamond Valuation and Royalty Assessment program, which is run by the Department of Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development.

Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/north/story/2012/03/29/north-federal-budget.html

by NationTalk on March 30, 2012838 Views

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Aboriginal youth hold memorial for crash victim – CTV.ca

Aboriginal youth hold memorial for crash victim

Fri Mar. 30 2012
ctvwinnipeg.ca

Aboriginal Youth Opportunities is honoring a woman who lost her life in a car crash five years ago.

In 2007, 20-year-old Tannis Bird was killed when a car hit a taxi cab at the corner of McPhillips Street and Pacific Avenue. The two cars then slid into a telephone poll.

Read more: http://winnipeg.ctv.ca/servlet/an/local/CTVNews/20120330/wpg_bird_memorial_120330/20120330/?hub=WinnipegHome

by NationTalk on March 30, 2012607 Views

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Aboriginal oilsands lawsuit cleared by Alberta court – CBC.ca

Aboriginal oilsands lawsuit cleared by Alberta court

The Canadian Press
Posted: Mar 30, 2012

An Alberta court says a northern aboriginal group’s lawsuit claiming damages for 15 years of energy development on traditional lands can proceed.

But a Queen’s Bench judge also says that even if the Beaver Lake band wins its case, it can’t ask the government to revoke more than 19,000 development permits already issued for the area.

The provincial and federal governments fought to have the lawsuit thrown out.

Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/news/business/story/2012/03/30/edmonton-aboriginal-lawsuit.html

by NationTalk on March 30, 2012699 Views

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Budget: Feds focus on younger native demographic – Montreal Gazette

Budget: Feds focus on younger native demographic

By Teresa Smith, Postmedia News March 29, 2012

OTTAWA — Education, job-training and a commitment to work with First Nations to settle land claims topped the government’s budget priority list for aboriginals, which is aimed at ensuring native people — both on- and off-reserve — become full and contributing members of the Canadian economy.

The government will invest $275 million over three years in education and job training, and almost $331 million over two years to build and renovate on-reserve water systems.

Citing statistics that show Canada’s youthful aboriginal population is booming, while the rest of Canadians are rapidly aging, the budget said First Nation, Inuit and Metis people will become an increasingly important source of Canada’s labour force growth.

Read more: http://www.canada.com/life/Budget+Feds+focus+younger+native+demographic/6380804/story.html#ixzz1qdOWz7qS

by NationTalk on March 30, 2012564 Views

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Missing Women inquiry needs time extension to succeed, NDP leader says – Vancouver Sun

Missing Women inquiry needs time extension to succeed, NDP leader says

By NEAL HALL, VANCOUVER SUN March 29, 2012

VANCOUVER – New Democrat Leader Adrian Dix called on the provincial government Thursday to grant a six-month extension to the “troubled” Missing Women inquiry.

“I’m appealing to this government to make this work now, to grant the extension now,” Dix said Thursday morning at a news conference attended by families of the victims of serial killer Robert Pickton.

“We can still succeed here if we provide more time and more voices,” Dix told reporters. “Why wouldn’t we want to do that? As it is, the inquiry is in trouble.”

Read more: http://www.vancouversun.com/news/Missing+Women+inquiry+needs+time+extension+succeed+leader+says/6380101/story.html#ixzz1qdO52lSO

by NationTalk on March 30, 2012621 Views

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Aboriginal Youth to Get More Cash for Education – Ottawa Citizen

Aboriginal youth to get more cash for education

Flaherty vows to ‘unlock’ untapped potential

BY TERESA SMITH, OTTAWA CITIZEN MARCH 30, 2012

Education, job-training and a commitment to work with First Nations to settle land claims topped the budget priority list for aboriginals, which is aimed at ensuring native people – both on-and off-reserve – become full and contributing members of the Canadian economy.

The government will invest $275 million over three years in education and job training, and almost $331 million over two years to build and renovate reserve water systems.

Citing statistics that show Canada’s youthful aboriginal population is booming, while the rest of Canadians are rapidly aging, the budget said First Nation, Inuit and Métis people will become an increasingly important source of labour force growth. The aim of the targeted spending, Finance Minister Jim Flaherty said Thursday, is to “unlock the potential of Canada’s First Nations children.”

Read more: http://www.ottawacitizen.com/business/Aboriginal+youth+more+cash+education/6382693/story.html#ixzz1qdNeU0Ma

by NationTalk on March 30, 2012775 Views

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More Cash for First Nations ‘Goodwill Gestures’ – Winnipeg Free Press

More cash for First Nations ‘goodwill gestures’

By: Larry Kusch

IN a belt-tightening federal budget, Canada’s First Nations were one of the few groups that received more funding from Ottawa.

But the $275 million over three years to build and renovate schools and improve educational programming, and $330 million over two years to improve water and sewer services, were described as “goodwill gestures” by Derek Nepinak, grand chief of the Assembly of Manitoba Chiefs.

Aboriginal leaders had called for $500 million to improve aboriginal schools and Manitoba’s Island Lake region needs $100 million alone for water and sewer services, Nepinak said.

Other funding for First Nations Thursday includes $27 million over two years to renew the urban aboriginal strategy and a commitment to improve on-reserve employment training.

Read more: http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/local/budget-aboriginal–b3-145085105.html

by NationTalk on March 30, 2012549 Views

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First Nations Members Have Right to Sell Fish – Postmedia News

First nations members have right to sell fish

BY TERESA SMITH, POSTMEDIA NEWS MARCH 30, 2012

In an apparent victory for native fishing rights, the Supreme Court of Canada has refused to re-examine a B.C. court ruling that members of five first nations have the right to make a living selling the fish they catch in their traditional territory.

The Supreme Court of Canada said Thursday it won’t review the case, which has been seen as a rebuke to the current federal fisheries regime. The lower courts have ruled that members of the five communities – which are scattered along the southwestern coast of Vancouver Island – have fished in those waters for centuries.

As a result, the Nuu-chah-nulth people have inherent rights to fish “for any species within certain defined territories,” and to sell the fish for profit, the B.C. courts found.

Read more: http://www.vancouversun.com/business/First+nations+members+have+right+sell+fish/6384275/story.html#ixzz1qdMxCeHS

by NationTalk on March 30, 2012679 Views

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Homesickness adds to struggles of northern students – Wawatay News

Homesickness adds to struggles of northern students

Thursday March 29, 2012
Christian Quequish – Special to Wawatay News

For Andrew Gliddy, a 26-year old film and television student at Humber College in southern Ontario who grew up in Kitchenuhmaykoosib Inninuwug First Nation, his first year at college was not too bad.

Gliddy said he was used to being away from home, having spent five to six years on his own.

The difficulties came in his second year, when a day after frosh week celebrations, he received news that his cousin was murdered.

Read more: http://www.wawataynews.ca/archive/all/2012/3/29/homesickness-adds-struggles-northern-students_22597

by NationTalk on March 30, 2012581 Views

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Gathering Our Voices gathers the energy of youth – Cowichan News Leader

Gathering Our Voices gathers the energy of youth

By Celina Albany – Cowichan News Leader Pictorial
Published: March 29, 2012

When you have 1,400 young people in a room, you can feel the energy vibrating.

That’s how many took in the 10th-annual Gathering Our Voices conference in Nanaimo last week and that’s the kind of energy local participants hope to bring back to Duncan.

The event was an excellent mentoring opportunity, which included training in leadership and tradition, according to Clinton “Fergie” Charlie of Penelekut who is a student in in the Native Indian Teaching Program at UBC.

“It really helps kids find their identity and puts healthy opportunities within reach,” said Charlie.

Read more: http://www.cowichannewsleader.com/news/144240885.html

by NationTalk on March 30, 2012482 Views

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Supporting Aboriginal writing – UAlberta

Supporting Aboriginal writing

By Michael Davies-VennMarch 29, 2012

(Edmonton) Indigenous writers will at the University of Alberta this weekend to help promote Aboriginal literature, support emerging writers and connect writers who have common interests.

The event, Tâpwê—which means “it is true” or “it is so”—brings emerging and established Aboriginal authors to the Telus Centre on Friday and Saturday for a panel discussion and gala reading. U of A English and film studies researcher Christine Wiesenthal says the event will help open up the cannon on Aboriginal literature.

“There is a younger generation of emerging Aboriginal writers who’re moving into new genres and producing innovative works that are distinct from canonical Aboriginal writers. It’s an opportunity to showcase some of those newer voices,” she said.

Read more: http://www.news.ualberta.ca/article.aspx?id=79B927A832BF43D88A93809313700CC8

by NationTalk on March 30, 2012660 Views

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Oji-Cree, Ojibwe languages getting stronger – Wawatay News

Oji-Cree, Ojibwe languages getting stronger

Thursday March 29, 2012
Rick Garrick – Wawatay News

While older youth seem to be using their languages less frequently, especially in urban centres, more elementary school children are learning Oji-Cree and Ojibwe and that has instructors optimistic for the future of the languages.

“It’s coming back full blast in the school system, where there’s a variety of choices to take either French or our First Nation language,” said Nathaniel Moses, the BIWAASE’AA youth outreach worker at Our Lady of Charity School who has worked in the public school system in Thunder Bay for the past nine years. “I think it’s going to bloom from there.”

Moses has seen a significant change among students over the past nine years regarding their heritage, being proud of who they are and achieving success for themselves.

Read more: http://www.wawataynews.ca/archive/all/2012/3/29/oji-cree-ojibwe-languages-getting-stronger_22601

by NationTalk on March 30, 2012612 Views

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Arctic Bay Needs More than a Nanisivik Port Upgrade: MLA – Nunatsiaq Online

Arctic Bay needs more than a Nanisivik port upgrade: MLA

“We didn’t see much benefit for the community”

Nunavut March 30, 2012
SARAH ROGERS

People in Arctic Bay were among first to hear about the federal government’s downgraded plans for a Nanisivik naval facility.

But Quttiktuq MLA Ron Elliott says the downsizing decision wasn’t a surprise.

Elliott said that move isn’t a blow for people in the community, because they never expected to benefit from the project in the first place.

Arctic Bay, located about 20 kilometres east of the former Nanisivik mine site, has a history of shared infrastructure with the former lead-zinc mine.

Read more: http://www.nunatsiaqonline.ca/stories/article/65674arctic_bay_needs_more_than_a_nanisivik_port_upgrade_mla/

by NationTalk on March 30, 2012575 Views

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VIHA Unveils 2012 Aboriginal Health Strategy – Courier-Islander

VIHA unveils 2012 aboriginal health strategy

COURIER-ISLANDER MARCH 30, 2012

The Vancouver Island Health Authority and its Aboriginal partners unveiled the health authority’s 2012 Aboriginal Health Plan at a special signing ceremony held in the traditional territory of We Wai Kai Nation/Cape Mudge located in the Campbell River area.

The plan, entitled Remember the Past, Reflect on the Present, and Build a Healthy Future, will serve as a guide for VIHA’s Board, leadership and staff in their work to continue to improve the health status of Aboriginal residents. The 2012 Aboriginal Health Plan updates VIHA’s 2006 plan and encompasses more than a year of engagement and collaborative working partnerships between Aboriginal partners from across Vancouver Island and VIHA leaders and staff.

“Improving the health of Aboriginal people is one of VIHA’s strategic priorities and the 2012 Aboriginal Health Plan will help us accomplish this priority,” said Don Hubbard, VIHA Board Chair. “This plan also reinforces our commitment to health services delivery that reflects and honours the input and cultural beliefs of Aboriginal residents.”

Read more: http://www.canada.com/VIHA+unveils+2012+aboriginal+health+strategy/6383795/story.html

by NationTalk on March 30, 2012493 Views

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Tories trim Aboriginal Affairs budget but find cash to boost education – Globe and Mail

Tories trim Aboriginal Affairs budget but find cash to boost education

GLORIA GALLOWAY
Ottawa— Globe and Mail Update
Published Thursday, Mar. 29, 2012

Aboriginals will get an injection of cash to help improve the lot of their students, many of whom spend their days in deteriorating classrooms with sub-standard teaching and limited access to libraries and computers.

And a program to improve water systems will be extended to help remedy the deplorable conditions on reserves, some of which have been compared to the worst of the developing world.

Still, the federal budget released Thursday does not eliminate the 2 per cent cap on increases that applies to most on-reserve spending – a cap that has been in effect since 1996, which aboriginal leaders blame for their deteriorating standard of living.

Read more: http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/politics/tories-trim-aboriginal-affairs-budget-but-find-cash-to-boost-education/article2386067/?utm_medium=Feeds%3A%20RSS%2FAtom&utm_source=Politics&utm_content=2386067

by NationTalk on March 29, 2012755 Views

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Vancouver Island Health Authority signs off on aboriginal health plan extension – Campbell River Mirror

Vancouver Island Health Authority signs off on aboriginal health plan extension

March 29, 2012

After suffering a stroke a year ago, Chief David Bob has seen the health care system from all sides now.

“So, I got to see both ends,” Bob said Tuesday at a ceremony to sign a new Aboriginal Health Plan for the Vancouver Island Health Authority.

Bob is the co-chair of the Aboriginal Health Council and was involved in the development of the plan advocating for the needs of aboriginal people in the Island’s health care system.

“And then I end up in the hospital and see what the nurses and doctors go through,” Bob said.

Read more: http://www.campbellrivermirror.com/news/144947845.html

by NationTalk on March 29, 2012547 Views

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Aboriginal women of BC take their fight to DC – HQ Cowichan Valley

Aboriginal women of B.C. take their fight to D.C.

Thursday, March 29, 2012
By Carmen Weld Duncan

They had to go to Washington, D.C. to call out the B.C. and Canadian government for their lack of action regarding missing and murdered aboriginal women in our province.

B.C’s Sharon McIvor with the Canadian Feminist Alliance for International Action shared the plight of the First Nations in front of the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights Wednesday.

McIvor described how she believes aboriginal women are seen by western society.

”An objectified sexual person, that is put in place to satisfy the sexual gratification for the male. And until we can move away from that, they can go and do what they want with those aboriginal women and nobody cares.”

Read more: http://hqcowichanvalley.com/home/local/news/Local/12/03/29/Aboriginal-women-of-B-C-take-their-fight-to-D-C

by NationTalk on March 29, 2012790 Views

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Aboriginal seats protected at Memorial – Macleans.ca

Aboriginal seats protected at Memorial

By Macleans.ca | March 29th, 2012

Human Rights Commission grants special status

Memorial University’s Aboriginal Designated Seats Program has been granted special status by the Newfoundland and Labrador Human Rights Commission, according to today.mun.ca. The status makes it difficult to challenge the up-to three seats that Memorial saves for students of Aboriginal Canadian descent who meet minimum entrance standards in a wide range of programs from visual arts to medicine.

Read more: http://oncampus.macleans.ca/education/2012/03/29/aboriginal-seats-protected-at-memorial/

by NationTalk on March 29, 2012597 Views

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Nunavut youth: immersed in booze, weed, boredom – nunatsiaqonline.ca

Nunavut youth: immersed in booze, weed, boredom

Eight in 10 Nunavut kids smoke dope by age 18

JANE GEORGE
Nunavut March 28, 2012

To be young in Nunavut often means to be stoned, drunk and bored, researchers funded by Health Canada reported March 27 at an Iqaluit community meeting.

Iqaluit and Kimmirut youth aged 11 to 20 are two to three times more likely to take drugs and drink alcohol than their peers in southern Canada, the researchers said.

Most start smoking marijuana and drinking alcohol by age 14, and nearly all youth are smoking dope and drinking by the time they turn 18.

Read more: http://www.nunatsiaqonline.ca/stories/article/65674nunavut_youth_immersed_in_booze_weed_boredom/

by NationTalk on March 29, 2012644 Views

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“Stand With Us to Fight” – Dominion Paper

“Stand With Us to Fight”

Hundreds protest Enbridge pipeline and oil tankers at Heiltsuk-led rally

MARCH 28, 2012

VANCOUVER—Hundreds of people from First Nations, environmental and community organizations and others from Vancouver and beyond rallied against Enbridge’s Northern Gateway pipeline and coastal oil supertanker traffic earlier today, filling the Vancouver Art Gallery grounds.

A march led by the Heiltsuk Nation, of the Central Coast, departed from the Coastal First Nations office at Granville and Hastings streets and wound its way through the downtown business district to join those waiting at the Vancouver Art Gallery. The rally marked the 23rd anniversary of the Exxon Valdez oil spill off the coast of Alaska, which spilled hundreds of thousands of barrels of oil on March 24, 1989.

Read more: http://www.dominionpaper.ca/articles/4402

by NationTalk on March 29, 2012503 Views

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Student and teacher learn from first-ever First Nations Human Resources National Conference – commons.bcit.ca

Student and teacher learn from first-ever First Nations Human Resources National Conference

Posted on March 27, 2012 by Andrea Bellamy

It was a unique opportunity with equally unique learning outcomes. The First Nations National Human Resources Conference, held in Winnipeg Manitoba this February, was the first of its kind in Canada.

Human Resource Management Program Head Debby Cleveland attended the conference along with Michelle Dragon, a second-year Human Resource Management student.

“The conference appealed to me because of the potentially significant role that First Nations have in major developments that are on the horizon for northern British Columbia,” says Debby. “Historically, programs that included First Nations communities as a significant component of the work force on major developments have encountered many challenges. I wanted to learn about some of the issues from the presenters and delegates at the conference.”

Read more: http://commons.bcit.ca/update/2012/03/student-and-teacher-learn-from-first-ever-first-nations-human-resources-national-conference/

by NationTalk on March 28, 2012519 Views

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Lens of Empowerment exhibit focuses on women in Stó:lō territory – UFV Today

Lens of Empowerment exhibit focuses on women in Stó:lō territory

by Ashley Wray on March 26, 2012

Give people the tools to express what they see, and you never know what they’ll show you.

That is the idea behind the Lens of Empowerment project, a three-course program undertaken by 11 UFV students that examines the lives and experiences of women in Stó:lō territory.

The Fraser Valley audience will have the chance to view the results of the project on Friday, March 30 at the opening and premiere of the Lens of Empowerment exhibition. The photographic and video exhibit opening ceremony will be at 3 pm in the gallery in Room B136 on the Abbotsford campus. The students will then show their videos in the lecture theatre (B101) at 5 pm. The public is welcome and attendance is free.

Part of the inspiration for this project came from a desire to acknowledge Stó:lō territory for future generations.

Read more: http://blogs.ufv.ca/2012/03/lens-of-empowerment-exhibit-focuses-on-women-in-stolo-territory/

by NationTalk on March 28, 2012496 Views

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