S Mainstream Aboriginal Related News

Press ReleasesText

Yellowknife considers abandoned mine as geothermal heat source -CBC

Yellowknife considers abandoned mine as geothermal heat source

Last Updated: Monday, November 5, 2007 | 5:03 PM CT
CBC News

The abandoned Con Mine in Yellowknife could one day keep the city’s residents warm, depending on the results of a feasibility study the city will launch in the new year.

City officials will assemble a team to study whether geothermal energy can be harnessed from the former underground mine site, which produced five million ounces of gold from 1938 to 2003.

http://www.cbc.ca/canada/north/story/2007/11/05/yknife-heat.html?ref=rss

by NationTalk on November 7, 2007800 Views

Read More
Press ReleasesText

Publication ban argued in Wal-Mart baby case -Prince Albert Daily Herald

Publication ban argued in Wal-Mart baby case

BRIGETTE JOBIN
The Prince Albert Daily Herald

Lawyers argued Monday afternoon against and for a publication ban protecting the identity of the woman charged with abandoning her baby in the toilet of a Wal-Mart washroom.

Since the 21-year-old woman made her first court appearance on Sept. 13, a publication ban has been in place protecting her identity. Although there is no specific clause in the criminal code protecting the accused woman – there is a section protecting victims and witnesses – the ban was ordered.

http://www.paherald.sk.ca/index.cfm?sid=77850&sc=4

by NationTalk on November 7, 2007863 Views

Read More
Press ReleasesText

Battle brewing over proposed oil pipeline -CBC

Battle brewing over proposed oil pipeline

Last Updated: Tuesday, November 6, 2007 | 8:06 AM CT
CBC News

A group of First Nations leaders in Manitoba is meeting Tuesday to map out a strategy for forcing one of the country’s largest gas and oil distributors to pay them for putting a pipeline through traditional territory.

A proposed Enbridge Pipelines project called the Alberta Clipper would pass through southern Manitoba on its way from Alberta to Wisconsin.

http://www.cbc.ca/canada/manitoba/story/2007/11/05/enbridge.html?ref=rss

by NationTalk on November 7, 2007870 Views

Read More
Press ReleasesText

37% of smokers buying illegal cigarettes: Study -Toronto Star

37% of smokers buying illegal cigarettes: Study

Availability of contraband smokes negates intended health benefits of tobacco taxation, report says

Nov 05, 2007 05:53 PM
THE CANADIAN PRESS

A new study that found one-quarter of Ontario smokers bought contraband cigarettes from aboriginal reserves, costing the province at least $72 million in lost tax revenue, should be a wake-up call to the governing Liberals to crack down on illegal tobacco sales, critics said today.

http://www.thestar.com/News/Ontario/article/273720

by NationTalk on November 7, 2007772 Views

Read More
Press ReleasesText

Canadian Aboriginal Festival -Toronto Star

Canadian Aboriginal Festival

Nov 06, 2007 09:32 AM
Canadian Aboriginal Music Awards
Friday, November 30
Festival – Dec. 1 & 2
Rogers Centre
Don’t miss the Toronto Star POW WOW!

http://www.thestar.com/article/273964

by NationTalk on November 7, 2007847 Views

Read More
Press ReleasesText

USS Honours Aboriginal Grade 12s -Westcoaster

USS Honours Aboriginal Grade 12s

By Carol Sedgwick

Once again this fall, School District 70 held Success Forums in three communities to acknowledge our First Nations students for achieving their goals of reaching Grade 12.

Ucluelet secondary school First Nations Grade 12 students were honoured at two separate community events.

http://www.westcoaster.ca/modules/AMS/article.php?storyid=2953

by NationTalk on November 7, 2007758 Views

Read More
Press ReleasesText

From restless communities to resilient places: fixing our municipal fiscal imbalance -Globe and Mail

From restless communities to resilient places: fixing our municipal fiscal imbalance

MIKE HARCOURT
Special to Globe and Mail Update
November 6, 2007 at 12:53 AM EST

The split of government revenues in Canada is 50 per cent federal, 42 per cent provincial — and 8 per cent municipal. Not only that, but Canada’s municipalities are the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development’s most property tax dependent. That’s why our communities’ water pipes leak, streets are potholed, bridges and overpasses are crumbling, public transit is decrepit, the homeless aren’t housed, and community centres, skating rinks, swimming pools, libraries and theatres are run down.

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/story/RTGAM.20071105.wcomment1106/BNStory/Front/

by NationTalk on November 7, 20071065 Views

Read More
Press ReleasesText

Review panel hears final recommendations on Mackenzie pipeline -Globe and Mail

Review panel hears final recommendations on Mackenzie pipeline

BOB WEBER
The Canadian Press
November 6, 2007

In two years of hearings in 26 northern communities, a panel reviewing the potential environmental and social impacts of a $16-billion natural gas pipeline down the Mackenzie Valley took in enough submissions to block a herd of caribou.

The panel begins hearing final recommendations today and concerns registered by everyone from government scientists to native hunters have been remarkably consistent: Protect special areas, prepare for a development boom, make sure climate change doesn’t make the pipeline unsafe and monitor whatever changes it brings.

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/story/LAC.20071106.PIPELINE06/TPStory/?query=ABORIGINAL

by NationTalk on November 7, 2007767 Views

Read More
Press ReleasesText

McMillan re-elected Liard chief -CBC

McMillan re-elected Liard chief
Former chief Morris, convicted of assault, came in third

Last Updated: Tuesday, November 6, 2007 | 1:26 PM CT
CBC News

Liard McMillan won another term Monday as chief of the Liard First Nation in Watson Lake, Yukon, beating out two other candidates, including disgraced former chief Daniel Morris.

Voters in the First Nation, which includes members in Whitehorse and Lower Post, B.C., re-elected McMillan with 216 votes in Monday’s council election.

http://www.cbc.ca/canada/north/story/2007/11/06/yk-liard.html

by NationTalk on November 7, 20071088 Views

Read More
Press ReleasesText

Accused in N.W.T. elder shooting pleads guilty -CBC

Accused in N.W.T. elder shooting pleads guilty

Last Updated: Monday, November 5, 2007 | 5:41 PM CT
CBC News

The young man accused in the July shooting of an elder in Fort Good Hope, N.W.T., struck a plea bargain with the Crown in a Yellowknife courtroom on Monday, pleading guilty to three of the five charges against him.

Alexis Taureau, 18, of Fort Good Hope, pleaded guilty to breaking and entering, assault with a weapon, and firing a firearm with the intent of causing bodily harm in the July 16 armed invasion where Thomas Manuel Sr. received buckshot wounds to his face.

http://www.cbc.ca/canada/north/story/2007/11/05/fgh-guilty.html

by NationTalk on November 7, 2007962 Views

Read More
Press ReleasesText

RCMP officer, 20, shot and killed in line of duty -CTV

RCMP officer, 20, shot and killed in line of duty

Updated Tue. Nov. 6 2007 8:22 PM ET
CTV.ca News Staff

A 20-year-old Mountie was shot and killed in the line of duty in Kimmirut, a small community in Nunavut.

Const. Douglas Scott became the second RCMP officer within a month to be gunned down in the region. His death comes as the national police force reviews its back-up policy and questions swirl around the practice of sending inexperienced officers to Canada’s high arctic.

http://www.ctv.ca/servlet/ArticleNews/story/CTVNews/20071106/rcmp_nunavut_071106/20071106/

by NationTalk on November 7, 2007951 Views

Read More
Press ReleasesText

Aboriginal activist decries renovations -Globe and Mail

Aboriginal activist decries renovations

JUSTINE HUNTER
November 6, 2007

VICTORIA — When Shelly Johnson, a long-time advocate for aboriginal youth in Victoria, stepped off the elevator for a meeting in the Ministry of Children and Families’ newly renovated executive offices, she was stunned.

The ministry had recently completed $560,000 in renovations for the lavishly appointed meeting space, a project initially budgeted at $200,000.

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/story/LAC.20071106.BCLAVISHVAN/TPStory/?query=ABORIGINAL

by NationTalk on November 7, 2007749 Views

Read More
Press ReleasesText

Protect land ahead of pipeline, Mackenzie panel told -Globe and Mail

Protect land ahead of pipeline, Mackenzie panel told

Canadian Press
November 5, 2007 at 6:13 PM EST

In two years of hearings in 26 northern communities, a panel reviewing the potential environmental and social impacts of a $16-billion natural gas pipeline down the Mackenzie Valley took in enough submissions to block a herd of caribou.

The panel begins hearing final recommendations Tuesday and concerns registered by everyone from government scientists to aboriginal hunters have been remarkably consistent: protect special areas, prepare for a development boom, make sure climate change doesn’t make the pipeline unsafe and monitor whatever changes it brings.

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/story/RTGAM.20071105.wpipeline1105/BNStory/Front/

by NationTalk on November 7, 2007781 Views

Read More
Press ReleasesText

Bridging the language gap -The Labradorian

Bridging the language gap
Torngasok Cultural Centre unveils new learning tools

JAMIE TARRANT
The Labradorian

Nunatsiavut’s Torngasok Cultural Centre recently unveiled four new language tools Labrador Inuit can use to learn about their language.

At a ceremony held last Monday at the Aboriginal Friendship Centre, a Rosetta Stone CD-Rom, Inuktitut dictionary, children’s book “Atuagaga uKausinnut,” and a book of stories gathered from the Unikkalautta storytelling festival last May, were made available to schools and Inuit beneficiaries.

http://www.thelabradorian.ca/index.cfm?sid=77533&sc=347

by NationTalk on November 7, 2007973 Views

Read More
Press ReleasesText

U.S. moving to claim parts of Beaufort Sea -CTV

U.S. moving to claim parts of Beaufort Sea

Updated Mon. Nov. 5 2007 9:06 PM ET
The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — American officials urged the Senate on Monday to quickly endorse the international treaty on the Law of the Sea, saying it’s vital to U.S. security and access to untapped Arctic energy resources.

Without the treaty, which came into effect in 1994 and has been ratified by 155 countries including Canada, the United States has no ability to assert rights over offshore areas thought to be rich in oil and gas.

http://www.ctv.ca/servlet/ArticleNews/story/CTVNews/20071105/beaufort_sea_071105/20071105?hub=Politics

by NationTalk on November 7, 2007784 Views

Read More
Press ReleasesText

Drop out of school, make more money – Macleans.ca

Drop out of school, make more money
Some high school dropouts are earning more than university grads, according to a Statistics Canada report

Carson Jerema, Macleans.ca | Nov 05, 2007 |

University graduates with underwhelming salaries might have been better off dropping out of high school, according to a Statistics Canada report released on Thursday.

The report, authored with Canadian Policy Research Networks, found that some high school dropouts earned more than university grads. The study, based on the 2004 Youth In Transition Survey, tracked labour market participation among the 22-24 age bracket. The study found that 14.3 per cent of those earning the least (less than $360 per week) had university degrees, compared to high school dropouts who accounted for only 12.8 per cent. Moreover, the median wage for high school dropouts was was higher than the lowest average wage for university grads.

http://www.macleans.ca/education/universities/article.jsp?content=20071105_190916_9484

by NationTalk on November 6, 2007841 Views

Read More
Press ReleasesText

Protect land ahead of pipeline, review panel told on last days of hearings (The Canadian Press)

Protect land ahead of pipeline, review panel told on last days of hearings

By Bob Weber, The Canadian Press

In two years of hearings in 26 northern communities, a panel reviewing the potential environmental and social impacts of a $16-billion natural gas pipeline down the Mackenzie Valley took in enough submissions to block a herd of caribou.

The panel begins hearing final recommendations Tuesday and concerns registered by everyone from government scientists to aboriginal hunters have been remarkably consistent: protect special areas, prepare for a development boom, make sure climate change doesn’t make the pipeline unsafe and monitor whatever changes it brings.

http://ca.news.yahoo.com/s/capress/071105/business/arctic_pipeline_recommendations_1

by NationTalk on November 6, 2007789 Views

Read More
Press ReleasesText

Illegal cigarettes from native reserves cost government over $100 million: study (The Canadian Press)

Illegal cigarettes from native reserves cost government over $100 million: study

By Chinta Puxley, The Canadian Press

TORONTO – A new study which found one-quarter of Ontario smokers bought contraband cigarettes from aboriginal reserves, costing the province at least $72 million in lost tax revenue, should be a wake-up call to the governing Liberals to crack down on illegal tobacco sales, critics said Monday.

The study, conducted between January 2005 and June 2006 for the Ontario Tobacco Research Unit, found 37 per cent of Ontario smokers avoided paying hefty tobacco taxes by purchasing their smokes from aboriginal reserves, while 26 per cent said they had done so in the last six months.

http://ca.news.yahoo.com/s/capress/071105/national/illegal_cigarettes_reserves_1

by NationTalk on November 6, 20071097 Views

Read More
Press ReleasesText

A puzzling land freeze (The Brantford Expositor)

A puzzling land freeze

Posted 14 hours ago

The province owes answers about a two-year freeze on development of land it owns south of Six Nations reserve. Haldimand-Norfolk MPP Toby Barrett spent a frustrating week unsuccessfully trying to get information from the newly created Ministry of Aboriginal Affairs.

Barrett is concerned that the province has expanded the list of sites that may be turned over to Six Nations as part of a land claims settlement. In April 2006, the province said the former Douglas Creek Estates in Caledonia, Burtch Correctional Centre and provincially-owned land at Townsend and South Cayuga were on the table.

http://www.brantfordexpositor.com/ArticleDisplay.aspx?e=763169

by NationTalk on November 6, 2007763 Views

Read More
Press ReleasesText

Coming verdict in BC land-claims case may spark more court action -CBC

Coming verdict in B.C. land-claims case may spark more court action

Last Updated: Monday, November 5, 2007 | 8:02 PM ET
The Canadian Press

The B.C. government is closely watching the courts for an expected ruling on a controversial aboriginal land-claims case that could end up sparking more court action.

Aboriginal Relations Minister Mike de Jong said Monday the B.C. Supreme Court ruling expected within days on the 17-year-old case is bound to stir a debate among aboriginals and governments.

http://www.cbc.ca/canada/british-columbia/story/2007/11/05/bc-land.html

by NationTalk on November 6, 2007872 Views

Read More
Press ReleasesText

Road blockade down; First Nation meets with Manitoba gov’t – CBC

Road blockade down; First Nation meets with Manitoba gov’t

Last Updated: Monday, November 5, 2007 | 6:00 PM CT
CBC News

Representatives from Manitoba Conservation and the Hollow Water First Nation who had traded barbs for weeks over blockades near the reserve, had a more congenial meeting at the Manitoba legislature Monday.

Two days after removing barricades on roads near the reserve, Chief Ian Bushie travelled to Winnipeg to meet with Conservation Minister Stan Struthers.

http://www.cbc.ca/canada/manitoba/story/2007/11/05/hollow-water.html

by NationTalk on November 6, 2007908 Views

Read More
Press ReleasesText

First nation buys downtown building – Whitehorse Star

First nation buys downtown building

By Chuck Tobin

The Teslin Tlingit Council has purchased the Shoppers Plaza on Main Street and the Tutshi Building along Second Avenue, the first nation announced Friday afternoon.

Included in the real estate package along with the office and retail businesses is the vacant Second Avenue lot directly across from the Andrew Philipsen Law Centre and a vacant Lambert Street lot behind the former Whitehorse Esso station, which was recently demolished.

http://www.whitehorsestar.com/auth.php?r=49042

by NationTalk on November 6, 2007850 Views

Read More
Press ReleasesText

Sewage problems assessed in spring by Health Canada – Daily Miner and News

Sewage problems assessed in spring by Health Canada

By Jon Thompson
Miner and News
Monday November 05, 2007

The Northwestern Health Unit survey released last week showing devastating septic conditions on the Mishkeegogamang First Nation was not the first of its kind. Health Canada and Indian Affairs assessed sewage conditions there in the spring.

In the last week of April, Indian Affairs met with the band leadership to discuss the results of Health Canada’s inspection of septic systems. At that meeting, the government offered to earmark funding to fix the 20 systems identified in most dire need by the band and asked for a long-term projection of infrastructural budgets. That report has still not been received.

http://www.kenoradailyminerandnews.com/News/351587.html

by NationTalk on November 6, 2007719 Views

Read More
Press ReleasesText

First Nation residents complete economic training – Nova Scotia Business Journal

First Nation residents complete economic training

BY STAFF, TRANSCONTINENTAL MEDIA
The Nova Scotia Business Journal

Three Cape Breton members of the Atlantic Aboriginal Economic Developers Network have successfully completed a three-year professional certification training program. Jim Hepworth, Millbrook First Nation; David Nevin, Shubenacadie First Nation; and Deboarh Dykstra, Pictou Landing were among 20 people who finished the program.

http://www.novascotiabusinessjournal.com/index.cfm?sid=77585&sc=107

by NationTalk on November 6, 2007772 Views

Read More
Press ReleasesText

Houses on Kayong property not for long – Winnipeg Sun

Houses on Kapyong property not for long

By PAUL TURENNE, SUN MEDIA

Military housing near Kenaston Boulevard is not likely to be there for too many more years, according to MP Vic Toews.

Last week, Toews, president of the Federal Treasury Board, approved an application from the Department of National Defence to transfer the 65-hectare site of the former Kapyong Barracks in Tuxedo to the federal Crown corporation that will ultimately sell it to either another government body or to a private developer.

http://winnipegsun.com/News/Winnipeg/2007/11/05/4632601.html

by NationTalk on November 6, 2007879 Views

Read More
Press ReleasesText

Mi’kmaq Stories Unearthed -The Chronicle Herald

Mi’kmaq stories unearthed
Author-editor Peter Sanger, working with translator Elizabeth Paul and illustrator Alan Syliboy, brings to light a pair of texts — tales from the first nation’s distant past

By JODI DELONG
Sun. Nov 4 – 7:33 AM

“FINDING these two lost Mi’kmaq texts is the equivalent in our culture of finding a new play by Shakespeare.”

Peter Sanger has his listeners’ full attention as he speaks these words. We’re in a room of the Vaughn Library at Acadia University, where Gaspereau Press is launching its newest book. The Stone Canoe: Two Lost Mi’kmaq Texts is described as a story about two stories and their travels through the written record.

http://thechronicleherald.ca/Books/976555.html

by NationTalk on November 6, 2007756 Views

Read More
Press ReleasesText

Northwest BC Needs a Different Vision –

Northwest BC Needs a Different Vision

David MacKinnon : Nov 5.2007

Last month, the British Columbia government announced that it was going to support the development of a 287 kV transmission line north from Terrace to Bob Quinn on Highway 37. Premier Gordon Campbell promised that miners, energy developers and others would soon be able to rely on “clean, reliable power” to promote development. He neglected to say that the development that the power would promote would be anything but clean, and in fact would undermine his own pledge from only a few days before to implement an aggressive new climate action plan.

http://riverswithoutborders.org/blog/itn/2007/11/northwest-bc-needs-a-different-vision/

by NationTalk on November 6, 2007795 Views

Read More
Press ReleasesText

Win natives’ trust: Miner -The Province

Win natives’ trust: Miner

The Province
Published: Sunday, November 04, 2007

“This sends a signal that is being watched, even globally, about the ability to develop mines in Canada,” Jepsen says.

Companies must accept that there are huge cultural differences between natives and non-natives — and enormous differences within the native community itself, Jepsen says.

http://www.canada.com/theprovince/news/money/story.html?id=86590bd6-cb94-4f5c-b82b-9052c18fd319

by NationTalk on November 6, 2007870 Views

Read More
Press ReleasesText

More needs to be done to improve conditions -The Leader-Post

More needs to be done to improve conditions

Doug Cuthand, Special to The Leader-Post
Published: Monday, November 05, 2007

Forgive me if I don’t join the chorus of praise for the Conservative government’s economic statement that called for tax cuts for the GST and corporate and personal income tax. There are more deficits in this country than the federal financial deficit and they need to be addressed.

In Canada we have an infrastructure deficit and a health-care deficit, and for First Nations we have both, plus a socio-economic deficit.

http://www.canada.com/reginaleaderpost/news/city_province/story.html?id=007235ef-21be-4f5d-b815-a1da94542e0e&p=1

by NationTalk on November 6, 2007803 Views

Read More
Press ReleasesText

Early freeze shuts out North -Edmonton Journal

Early freeze shuts out North
Isolated communities wait for supplies to be airlifted after weather cuts short shipping season

Elise Stolte, Journal Staff Writer
Published: 11:57 am

HAY RIVER, N.W.T. – People in Fort Good Hope are rationing toilet paper.

Diesel fuel for home heating is also in short supply.

http://www.canada.com/edmontonjournal/story.html?id=d738b89f-3f66-4db5-bf07-c07973069888&k=8165

by NationTalk on November 6, 2007662 Views

Read More
Press ReleasesText

Book Celebrates Métis Culture -The Leader-Post

Book celebrates Métis culture

Anne Kyle, Leader-Post
Published: Monday, November 05, 2007

The central character in Wilfred Burton’s children’s book the Fiddle Dancer, which he co-authored with Anne Patton, is based on his own childhood experiences growing up in a Métis family.

Their first book, which weaves a childhood story rich in Métis culture and language (Michif), has been shortlisted for the Saskatchewan Book Awards in three categories the 2007 First Book Award, 2007 Children’s Book Award and the Regina Book Award.

http://www.canada.com/reginaleaderpost/news/city_province/story.html?id=236057ff-5205-4ca1-80ba-ef45602a15e2

by NationTalk on November 6, 2007879 Views

Read More
Press ReleasesText

Strahl, Yukon leaders agree to further land claims talks -CBC

Strahl, Yukon leaders agree to further land claims talks

Last Updated: Monday, November 5, 2007 | 4:34 PM CT
CBC News

Yukon’s premier and top First Nation leader agreed Monday to more talks with Indian and Northern Affairs Minister Chuck Strahl to address a lack of federal funding to implement land claims and self-government agreements in the territory.

Talking to reporters Monday afternoon, Premier Dennis Fentie and Grand Chief Andy Carvill of the Council of Yukon First Nations said they were pleased with the progress made during their morning meeting with Strahl in Whitehorse.

http://www.cbc.ca/canada/north/story/2007/11/05/yk-strahl.html?ref=rss

by NationTalk on November 6, 2007907 Views

Read More
Press ReleasesText

B.C. land-claims decision could rock treaty process -Globe and Mail

B.C. land-claims decision could rock treaty process

JUSTINE HUNTER
From Monday’s Globe and Mail
November 5, 2007 at 5:37 AM EST

VICTORIA — Aboriginal leaders and government treaty-makers are bracing for a potential milestone land-claims decision expected as early as today from the B.C. Supreme Court.

The William case, launched 17 years ago, centres on claims from a small native band in an inaccessible area of the Cariboo Chilcotin, sparked by a dispute with the provincial government over logging.

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/story/RTGAM.20071105.wbcnative05/BNStory/National/

by NationTalk on November 6, 2007810 Views

Read More
Press ReleasesText

Nunavut foster family association in the works -CBC

Nunavut foster family association in the works

Last Updated: Monday, November 5, 2007 | 9:24 AM CT
CBC News

Nunavut’s health minister says she hopes setting up a territorial foster parents’ group will encourage more people to take in foster children.

Leona Aglukkaq said the government first wants to ensure that Nunavut’s three regions all have foster family associations before establishing a territory-wide network, which would recruit, train and support foster parents.

http://www.cbc.ca/canada/north/story/2007/11/05/nu-foster.html

by NationTalk on November 6, 2007792 Views

Read More
Press ReleasesText

Double-team degrees -Globe and Mail

Double-team degrees

MARLENE HABIB
From Monday’s Globe and Mail
November 5, 2007 at 6:00 AM EST

As Kirsten Walker hits the books and the basketball court in Charlottetown, the teen basketball whiz is striving for a double slam dunk — to complete college while working toward her bachelor of arts.

Ms. Walker is enrolled this year in the sport and leisure-management program at Holland College, after which she’ll move to the University of Prince Edward Island, thanks to a joint degree-granting program between the two schools. For her, it was the most practical route to realizing her likely career goal — to become a teacher in sports and medicine.

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/story/RTGAM.20071105.edu-collegemain-1105/BNStory/education/

by NationTalk on November 6, 2007993 Views

Read More
Press ReleasesText

Big family on campus -Globe and Mail

Big family on campus

DIANNE RINEHART
From Monday’s Globe and Mail
November 5, 2007 at 6:00 AM EST

If you think orientation is a challenge for the average out-of-town student, consider the adjustment Joanie Brown and Andy Tugak faced when they moved to Winnipeg, population 633,451, from tiny Rankin Inlet, Nunavut, population 2,358, to attend Red River College — with eight kids in tow.

The family was turned away several times by landlords because of its size but eventually the college helped them find a place, says Ms. Brown, 38, who is completing Grade 12 in the Biindigen college-preparatory program at Red River with her spouse.

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/story/RTGAM.20071105.edu-family-1105/BNStory/education/

by NationTalk on November 6, 2007952 Views

Read More
Press ReleasesText

Gabriel Dumont Centre opens in La Ronge -The La Ronge Northerner

Gabriel Dumont Centre opens in La Ronge

The Gabriel Dumont Institute Training and Employment Inc.(GDI T&E) opened an offi ce in La Ronge in December 2006; the office offers employment-related information and resources to Metis people living in the north.

The resource area includes job postings, jobrelated information, assistance with resumes, “Clients looking for work are able to access the Internet to do job search or do their resumes … our mandate is to work with the unemployed and under-employed,” said Cecile O’Neil, program co-ordinator, who works out of the Prince Albert office.

http://www.townoflaronge.ca/TheNortherner/Story.php?id=355

by NationTalk on November 4, 20071009 Views

Read More
Press ReleasesText

Human cost -CNews

Global warming’s human cost

By VIVIAN SONG, NATIONAL BUREAU
The Toronto Sun

YELLOWKNIFE — There is something melancholy in Bill Erasmus’ conversation.

It’s a sad reverence for the loss of all that’s familiar and dependable for the aboriginals — predictable animal behaviour, land and weather patterns.

http://cnews.canoe.ca/CNEWS/Canada/2007/11/03/4627733-sun.html

by NationTalk on November 4, 2007894 Views

Read More
Press ReleasesText

27.Harper accused of ‘assimilation’ agenda: AFN angry he met with rival group CAP after summer snub -Halifax Daily News

Harper accused of ‘assimilation’ agenda
AFN angry he met with rival group CAP after summer snub

MICHAEL TUTTON
The Canadian Press

Canada’s largest aboriginal group criticized Stephen Harper for attending a meeting of a rival organization yesterday, though the prime minister responded he’s merely seeking “common ground” with groups he can work with.

In a speech to about 200 delegates of the Congress of Aboriginal Peoples, the prime minister cited statistics that the majority of aboriginals now live in cities, and said his Conservative government will make their concerns a priority.

http://www.hfxnews.ca/index.cfm?sid=77063&sc=89

by NationTalk on November 4, 2007824 Views

Read More
Press ReleasesText

Killing the curse -The Province

Killing the curse
Natives determined not to miss the benefits of B.C.’s latest mining rush

Paul Luke, The Province
Published: Sunday, November 04, 2007

Canadian Indians were shafted by the Klondike gold rush 110 years ago and won’t let it happen again, Phil Fontaine says.

The national chief of the Assembly of First Nations told a Vancouver audience last week that Skookum Jim Mason and his cousin, Tagish Charlie, made the actual Klondike discovery of 1896.

http://www.canada.com/theprovince/news/money/story.html?id=73b0707a-2886-4e17-8152-bdb37d1bf071&k=96040

by NationTalk on November 4, 2007942 Views

Read More
Press ReleasesText

Woman charged with abduction was pregnant -Globe and Mail

Woman charged with abduction was pregnant

HAYLEY MICK AND PATRICK WHITE
From Saturday’s Globe and Mail
November 3, 2007 at 1:16 AM EST

The woman charged with abducting a one-day-old girl from a Sudbury hospital was nine months pregnant and due to give birth on Monday, a family member said.

“We think she must have had a miscarriage or lost it somehow, and it really screwed her up emotionally,” Dean Presseault, whose wife is the woman’s cousin, told The Globe and Mail.

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/story/RTGAM.20071103.snatched03sb/BNStory/National/?page=rss&id=RTGAM.20071103.snatched03sb

by NationTalk on November 4, 2007849 Views

Read More
Press ReleasesText

Hollow Water Blockades finally come down -CJOB News

Hollow Water Blockades finally come down

NOV 03 2007 08:40 PM

The month and a half old blockades on the Hollow Water First Nation have come down, for the most part.

The main barricades blocking a winter road and a main route in the area have been removed. However, CJOB has been told a small road block still exits near some undeveloped cottage lots. It’s believed the barrier is not affecting traffic.

http://www.cjob.com/news/news_xml.aspx?src=loc&rem=78609

by NationTalk on November 4, 2007977 Views

Read More
Press ReleasesText

Premier makes an offer his ministers can’t refuse -Toronto Star

Shuffle lets McGuinty flex his muscle in front of wannabe successors

Nov 04, 2007 04:30 AM
Robert Benzie
Queen’s Park Bureau Chief

There can be only one boss in this family, only one premier.

Dalton McGuinty sent that message loud and clear Tuesday.

After conferring with his advisers, he shuffled his cabinet, ousting four ministers, promoting 10 backbenchers and, significantly, moving four of the seven people apparently jockeying to be his successor.

http://www.thestar.com/article/273368

by NationTalk on November 4, 2007696 Views

Read More
Press ReleasesText

Something’s fishy here -The Province

Something’s fishy here
Native Treaty Process: Expert says bands that have no rights to Fraser salmon are getting them from the feds

Brian Lewis, The Province
Published: Sunday, November 04, 2007

If anyone knows the political undercurrents and back eddies that flow within salmon fishing on the lower Fraser River, it’s Ernie Crey.

He’s a member of the Cheam Indian Band, a policy advisor for the much larger Sto:lo Tribal Council and for many years has been an active participant in this fishery — both as a fisherman and as a senior advisor with the federal Department of Fisheries and Oceans.

http://www.canada.com/theprovince/news/story.html?id=a76f218b-9d5c-4c1b-bf89-18da40985648

by NationTalk on November 4, 2007845 Views

Read More
Press ReleasesText

District’s aboriginal grad -Burnaby Now

District’s aboriginal grad rate low
Numbers improve but still lower than provincial average

Jennifer Moreau, Burnaby Now
Published: Saturday, November 03, 2007

Graduation rates for Burnaby students are higher than provincial averages in all but one category: aboriginal students.

That has trustees looking at ways to improve the system so aboriginal students stay in school.

http://www.canada.com/burnabynow/news/story.html?id=a1d857ba-695b-49c4-a09c-5bdc663c0a83&k=14513

by NationTalk on November 4, 2007718 Views

Read More
Press ReleasesText

Documentary focuses on aboriginal youth -ChronicleHerald

Documentary focuses on aboriginal youth

Sat. Nov 3 – 8:39 AM

The documentary video First Voices: Stories from Aboriginal Youth in the North and South created by six youth from Atlantic Canada and Latin America will be screened Wednesday at 7 p.m., at the Weldon Law Building, Room 105, Dalhousie University.

This series of short stories was produced by the Atlantic Council for International Cooperation (ACIC) and funded by the Canadian International Development Agency.

http://thechronicleherald.ca/Entertainment/976349.html

by NationTalk on November 4, 2007892 Views

Read More
Press ReleasesText

Book reflects on aboriginal servicewomen -The Chronicle Journal

Book reflects on aboriginal servicewomen

By CHEN CHEKKI
Saturday, November 3, 2007

Training in the Canadian army was not as hard for Marion Miller as looking after cattle and cutting wood on her First Nations reserve, she says in a new book.

The resident of Six Nations near Brantford, Ont., joined the army when she was 18 years old during the Second World War. She was courted to be an officer at first, but wanted to be a driver, she says in the book, “Invisible Women: WWII Aboriginal Servicewomen in Canada.”

http://www.chroniclejournal.com/stories_local.php?id=73490

by NationTalk on November 4, 2007925 Views

Read More
Press ReleasesText

Yellowbird, Bear dominate at Aboriginal Peoples Choice awards -CBC

Yellowbird, Bear dominate at Aboriginal Peoples Choice awards

Last Updated: Sunday, November 4, 2007 | 10:35 AM ET

Fast-rising Alberta country singer Shane Yellowbird tied with British Columbia singer-songwriter Cheryl Bear to win the most trophies at the second annual Aboriginal Peoples Choice Music Awards in Winnipeg.

A Cree from Hobbema, Alta., Yellowbird captured best country CD for Life is Calling My Name, best music video for Pickup Truck and aboriginal entertainer of the year during the ceremony at the MTS Centre on Friday night.

http://www.cbc.ca/canada/british-columbia/story/2007/11/04/aboriginal-peoples-awards.html

by NationTalk on November 4, 2007796 Views

Read More
Press ReleasesText

Landmark deal causing concern -Globe and Mail

B.C. LAND CLAIMS: THE TSAWWASSEN TREATY
Landmark deal causing concern
Native leaders worry about ‘me too’ clause

JUSTINE HUNTER
November 3, 2007

VICTORIA — It’s a little-known clause, hidden in a side agreement of the landmark Tsawwassen treaty, but a “me too” provision is creating friction among top aboriginal leaders in British Columbia.

To the Tsawwassen people, it provides assurance that if another aboriginal government negotiates a better deal on one particularly contentious aspect of their treaty, they can get a matching improvement.

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/story/LAC.20071103.BCTREATY03/TPStory/?query=ABORIGINAL

by NationTalk on November 4, 2007787 Views

Read More
Press ReleasesText

Business Almost as Usual in Hay River: Mayor, Minister -CBC

Business almost as usual in Hay River: mayor

Last Updated: Friday, November 2, 2007 | 2:42 PM CT
CBC News

The town of Hay River in the Northwest Territories will function as normally as it can without a municipal council, its mayor said after a court ruling this week removed all councillors from office.

Town services and programs will continue to run despite Wednesday’s N.W.T. Supreme Court ruling ordering a new council election because of irregularities in the October 2006 municipal vote, Mayor John Pollard told CBC News on Friday.

http://www.cbc.ca/canada/north/story/2007/11/02/hayriver-council.html

by NationTalk on November 3, 20071022 Views

Read More

NationTalk Partners & Sponsors Learn More

CLOSE
CLOSE