S Mainstream Aboriginal Related News

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Parents mourn murdered son – StarPhoenix

Parents mourn murdered son
20-year-old man city’s fifth homicide victim of 2007

Betty Ann Adam, The StarPhoenix
Published: Tuesday, October 09, 2007

An 18-year-old man has been arrested and charged with the Saturday morning shooting death of a Saskatoon man.

Catlin Albert Opissinow, 20, was found around 2 a.m. Saturday near an alley behind the 200 block of Avenue S South. He died at the scene, according to the Saskatoon Police Service.

http://www.canada.com/saskatoonstarphoenix/news/story.html?id=06edf3a4-1545-4bfe-987c-8870cbbd3731

by NationTalk on October 9, 20071144 Views

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EnCana on target (The Cold Lake Sun)

EnCana on target

Tracy Dermott
Tuesday October 09, 2007

The future of EnCana’s operations in Cold Lake were the topic of discussion at the marina last Wednesday night.

Representatives from the energy company were on hand to explain their current project at Foster Creek, which is located at the Cold Lake Air Weapons Range, and the future of that project.

http://www.coldlakesun.com/News/344294.html

by NationTalk on October 9, 2007913 Views

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Sustainable hunting practices part of ecotourism, proponents say (Canada.com)

Sustainable hunting practices part of ecotourism, proponents say

Kathryn Young , CanWest News Service
Published: Tuesday, October 09, 2007

Hunting, trapping and fishing can be considered ecotourism activities when conducted sustainably, some tour operators in Canada and the U.S. say.

Bill Bryan, co-founder of Off the Beaten Path, a custom travel planning company that takes small groups through the Rocky Mountains and Central and South America, presented this view at the recent International Ecotourism Society Conference, citing how hunters keep overpopulations of deer in check.

by NationTalk on October 9, 2007828 Views

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Grade 10, 11 students get new Mi’kmaq educational materials (The Truro Daily News)

Grade 10, 11 students get new Mi’kmaq educational materials

The Truro Daily News

MILLBROOK – Grade 10 and 11 students from across the province should gain a better understanding of Mi’kmaq studies thanks to new teaching materials provided by the Office of Aboriginal Affairs.

Assembly of Nova Scotia Chiefs co-chair Lawrence Paul said, “It is important that students learn more about the Mi’kmaq’s contributions towards Nova Scotia’s past and future.” Paul also stresses the importance of these new teaching materials reaching both aboriginal and non-aboriginal students.

http://www.trurodaily.com/index.cfm?sid=69515&sc=68

by NationTalk on October 9, 20071007 Views

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Good going Fiona – Northern News Services

Good going Fiona

Antoine Mountain
Guest columnist
Monday, October 8, 2007

No sooner than I raise the ugly but oh-so-real issue of teen suicides than we have this truly heartening story of famed Dene elder and writer George Blondin’s grand-daughter, Fiona, setting up a regular scholarship under our National Aboriginal Achievement Foundation!

To me there is no greater love to be shown these days for a living relative, than for a flesh and blood grandchild to go and do something nice, and necessary, like this.

http://nnsl.com/northern-news-services/stories/papers/oct8_07mountain.html

by NationTalk on October 9, 20071053 Views

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Web of information – Northern News Services

Web of information

Nunavut – Wannabe travelers to Nunavut now have a new set of information at their fingertips. Nunavut Tourism unveiled its new website last week.

“It is completely different,” said marketing and communications officer Jillian Dickens.

“It’s a more vibrant website now—more user friendly.”

http://nnsl.com/northern-news-services/stories/papers/oct8_07business.html

by NationTalk on October 8, 2007844 Views

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Show to feature Kakegamic originals (Almaguin News)

Show to feature Kakegamic originals

by Laurel Campbell
Oct 03, 2007

SOUTH RIVER: The splendour of the autumn colours reflected on the tranquility of Eagle Lake will be the perfect backdrop for this weekend’s annual art show and sale at Margaret Cunningham’s Studio by the Lake.

Cunningham started the annual Thanksgiving art show six years ago and attendance has continued to grow with approximately 400 people visiting her studio and cottage for last year’s event.

http://www.almaguinnews.com/almaguin/article/49406

by NationTalk on October 8, 20071034 Views

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How a generation lost its talk -The Daily News

How a generation lost its talk
This is the second in a five-part series exploring the Mi’kmaq nation specifically and matters affecting aboriginal people in general and will appear in The Daily News every Monday of Mi’kmaq History Month this October. This week: residential schools

CANDY PALMATER
The Daily News

“I lost my talk. The talk you took away when I was a little girl at Shubenacadie school.”

Those are the opening lines of a well-known poem by Mi’kmaq poet Rita Joe. With those few simple words, Joe gave voice to so many people across Canada who lost their “talk,” – and so much more – at Indian residential schools.

http://www.hfxnews.ca/index.cfm?sid=69392&sc=89

by NationTalk on October 8, 20071406 Views

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Aboriginals to deliver family services (Maple Ridge News)

Aboriginals to deliver family services

By Phil Melnychuk
Staff Reporter
Oct 06 2007

It’s not going to be an overnight process, turning heavy responsibilities such as youth justice and child protection over to First Nations agencies.

But in a few years, hopefully at least by 2020, aboriginal faces will be alongside white faces when an aboriginal family needs help.

http://www.mapleridgenews.com/portals-code/list.cgi?paper=46&cat=23&id=1078129&more=0

by NationTalk on October 8, 2007934 Views

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Feds estimate 40 to 50 natives on P.E.I. can apply for abuse compensation (The Guardian)

Feds estimate 40 to 50 natives on P.E.I. can apply for abuse compensation

JIM DAY
The Guardian and Canadian Press

Between 40 and 50 aboriginal residents on P.E.I. are expected to apply for compensation for harsh treatment endured at native residential schools.

A Service Canada spokesman released the estimate to The Guardian Friday.

http://www.theguardian.pe.ca/index.cfm?sid=69094&sc=98

by NationTalk on October 8, 2007837 Views

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Traditional food better despite pollutants, researchers say -CBC

Traditional food better despite pollutants, researchers say

Last Updated: Friday, October 5, 2007 | 9:50 AM CT
CBC News

Northerners should continue to eat traditional food despite increased contamination, researchers told a northern contaminants workshop in Lake Louise, Alta., on Thursday.

Although there is more mercury and other pollutants in the food, the benefits of eating caribou, whale and seal are greater than the risks, said Gary Stern, a researcher with the Department of Fisheries and Oceans.

http://www.cbc.ca/canada/north/story/2007/10/05/northern-food.html

by NationTalk on October 5, 2007929 Views

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Native Island Woman Speaks of her Inner ‘Death’ at N.S. School -The Guardian

Native Island woman speaks of her inner ‘death’ at N.S. school
Group holds healing vigil for native women abuse at facilities over years

JIM DAY
The Guardian

Thunder Child should soon be getting a cheque from the federal government.

It likely won’t be for $28,000 — the average payout expected to start arriving in coming weeks from nearly $2 billion allotted in native residential schools compensation.

About 80,000 former students can apply for common experience payments — $10,000 for the first year they attended the once-mandatory network of church-run schools, and $3,000 for each subsequent year.

http://www.theguardian.pe.ca/index.cfm?sid=68776&sc=98

by NationTalk on October 5, 2007895 Views

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Metis Nation Funding Resumes -The StarPhoenix

Metis Nation funding resumes

The StarPhoenix
Published: Friday, October 05, 2007

Money is once again flowing to the Metis Nation-Saskatchewan (MNS) after the provincial government suspended funding to the organization due to irregularities in its 2004 election process.

First Nations and Metis Relations Minister Maynard Sonntag announced a $385,000 contribution to the MNS’s operations and policy and research functions on Thursday.

http://www.canada.com/saskatoonstarphoenix/news/local/story.html?id=b2bf2333-6559-4bcc-949b-6ecf9ecf3d97

by NationTalk on October 5, 20071095 Views

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High-Tech Revives Ancient Tongue -The Times Colonist

High-tech revives ancient tongue
First Nations youth are employing computer technology to master the language of their elders

Judith Lavoie, Times Colonist
Published: Friday, October 05, 2007

A language traditionally spoken by First Nations in Saanich is being pulled back from the brink of extinction by new technology.

The spoken words of elders in the Tsawout, Tsartlip and Tseycum bands are being digitally transcribed, and the words — sometimes known by only a handful of people — added to a digital dictionary.

http://www.canada.com/victoriatimescolonist/news/capital_van_isl/story.html?id=1aa805ef-6466-4f7a-a707-4649ac5270b4&k=44460

by NationTalk on October 5, 20071041 Views

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Vouchers replace cash on dry reserve in bootlegging fight – CBC

Vouchers replace cash on dry reserve in bootlegging fight

Last Updated: Friday, October 5, 2007 | 10:08 AM CT
CBC News

Band officials are taking drastic steps to eliminate bootlegging on the Pauingassi First Nation, a remote Manitoba reserve where alcohol is prohibited.

Pauingassi residents receiving welfare will now receive vouchers, instead of cash, in an attempt to reduce the money available to pay bootleggers, band officials told CBC News.

http://www.cbc.ca/canada/manitoba/story/2007/10/05/pauingassi-vouchers.html

by NationTalk on October 5, 2007811 Views

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Public urged to remember plight of missing, murdered aboriginal women (The Canadian Press)

Public urged to remember plight of missing, murdered aboriginal women

Thu Oct 4, 7:08 PM
By Jennifer Graham, The Canadian Press

FORT Q’APPELLE, Sask. – Gwenda Yuzicappi sleeps with the phone next to her pillow, anxiously waiting for word about her daughter Amber Redman.

Redman was just 19 when she disappeared from Fort Qu’Appelle, Sask., more than two years ago, becoming one of the hundreds of missing or murdered native women and girls.

http://ca.news.yahoo.com/s/capress/071004/national/missing_women_7

by NationTalk on October 5, 2007783 Views

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Residential school payments not a handout: Fontaine (CTV.ca)

Residential school payments not a handout: Fontaine

Updated Fri. Oct. 5 2007 10:13 AM ET
CTV.ca News Staff

The national chief of the Assembly of First Nations said too much attention is being given to what recipients of residential school payments are spending their money on.

“There seems to have been a pre-occupation with that concern and I think that’s not neccesarily the healthiest take on this matter,” Phil Fontaine told CTV’s Canada AM on Friday.

http://www.ctv.ca/servlet/ArticleNews/story/CTVNews/20071004/fontaine_report_071004/20071005?hub=TopStories&s_name=

by NationTalk on October 5, 2007869 Views

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Police liable for negligent investigations, top court says (CBC)

Police liable for negligent investigations, top court says
Wrongfully convicted man seeks compensation

Last Updated: Thursday, October 4, 2007 | 5:38 PM ET
CBC News

A wrongly convicted Ontario man who established a legal principle for much of Canada but failed to win damages from police is asking the province to compensate him voluntarily for his 1995 arrest and 20 months he spent in jail.

http://www.cbc.ca/canada/ottawa/story/2007/10/04/hill-appeal.html?ref=rss

by NationTalk on October 5, 2007940 Views

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Vouchers replace cash on dry reserve in bootlegging fight – CBC

Vouchers replace cash on dry reserve in bootlegging fight

Last Updated: Friday, October 5, 2007 | 10:08 AM CT
CBC News

Band officials are taking drastic steps to eliminate bootlegging on the Pauingassi First Nation, a remote Manitoba reserve where alcohol is prohibited.

Pauingassi residents receiving welfare will now receive vouchers, instead of cash, in an attempt to reduce the money available to pay bootleggers, band officials told CBC News.

http://www.cbc.ca/canada/manitoba/story/2007/10/05/pauingassi-vouchers.html

by NationTalk on October 5, 20071003 Views

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‘Cosmic justice’ for new Lieutenant Governor – Peninsula News Review

‘Cosmic justice’ for new Lieutenant Governor

By Tom Fletcher
Black Press
Oct 05 2007

B.C.’s colonial past was obscured by dark curtains as the province’s first aboriginal Lieutenant-Governor was sworn in Monday.

The painting of Judge Matthew Begbie passing judgment on a native man and three other historical murals in the B.C. legislature rotunda haven’t yet been removed, as the government promised to do earlier this year. So they were covered up as a new era of symbolism began with the swearing in of former provincial court judge and Sto:lo chief Steven Point as the Queen’s representative in B.C.

http://www.peninsulanewsreview.com/portals-code/list.cgi?paper=24&cat=23&id=1077752&more=0

by NationTalk on October 5, 20071108 Views

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Classes go in after debt payment – Edmonton Journal

Classes go in after debt payment

CanWest News Service
Published: 2:52 am

WINNIPEG – They are a month behind their classmates, but 30 students from a Kenora-area First Nation just started school Thursday.

The students from Obashkaandagaang weren’t allowed to attend classes until the band paid its outstanding debt to the Keewatin-Patricia District School Board.

http://www.canada.com/edmontonjournal/news/story.html?id=e54098de-aecd-40fd-9c6d-1c8b5141562f

by NationTalk on October 5, 2007903 Views

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First Nations Vow to Stop Site C – Opinion250 News

First Nations Vow to Stop Site C
——————————————————————————–
By 250 News
Friday, October 05, 2007 03:58 AM

Last week Premier Gordon Campbell announced the province will be getting serious about the development of Site “C” . This is the project that would dam the Peace River upstream from Taylor. (photo at left is of the Peace River at Taylor)

The Premier may find the government will be butting heads with First Nations.

http://www.opinion250.com/blog/view/7152/3/first+nations++vow+to+stop+site+c

by NationTalk on October 5, 2007926 Views

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East side of lake politically potent – Winnipeg Free Press

East side of lake politically potent
McFadyen flying his Tory colours on issue

Fri Oct 5 2007
Mia Rabson

TORY Leader Hugh McFadyen took a hardline stance on land claims on the east side of Lake Winnipeg this week, strongly distinguishing himself from the NDP but landing him in hot water with aboriginal leaders.

The disagreement has shown just how politically divisive the issue of developing the east side of Lake Winnipeg is in the province, and could make life difficult for the Tories if, or realistically when, they return to power in Manitoba.

http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/subscriber/columnists/top3/story/4052039p-4658109c.html

by NationTalk on October 5, 2007942 Views

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Dragonflies, open water reveal rapid Arctic change -Globe and Mail

Dragonflies, open water reveal rapid Arctic change

DAWN WALTON
From Thursday’s Globe and Mail
October 4, 2007 at 12:03 AM EDT

Pierre Tautu doesn’t know whether it’s global warming or something else, but over the summer he noticed strange things happening around his Nunavut home in Chesterfield Inlet, at the top of Hudson Bay.

“We still have ice year-round, but there’s been a little bit of changes,” he said. “Different kinds of insects and different kind of birds that come around our area now.”

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/story/RTGAM.20071003.wwarm1004/BNStory/ClimateChange/?page=rss&id=RTGAM.20071003.wwarm1004

by NationTalk on October 5, 2007919 Views

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Roseau Chief supports roadblock -Altona Echo

Roseau Chief supports roadblock

By Greg Vandermeulen
Friday October 05, 2007

Although the blockade is nowhere near Roseau River First Nation, Chief Terrance Nelson said he is keeping a close eye on developments. Hollow Water First Nation has blockaded a road leading to cottages after the province allowed additional lots on land that the first nation says belongs to them.

Calling their blockade a “proactive action” Nelson said the blame is squarely on the federal government for not fulfilling original treaty obligations.

http://www.altonaecho.com/News/343598.html

by NationTalk on October 5, 2007893 Views

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‘Tired’ runner tops district meet -Prince Albert Daily Herald

Unusual training regimen pays off for Big River runner Ryan McAdam

VERN FAULKNER
Herald staff

A car tire propelled Randy McAdam to the provincial cross-country championships.

Midway through August, the young athlete from Big River First Nation began his training by sprinting up a nearby hill while carrying a car tire. When he got to the top, he would race back down, then repeat until he was dead tired.

As unorthodox as the training program might be, it ultimately proved successful, as the Grade 11 student from Se-Se-Wa-Hum High School (near Big River) delivered a dominating effort to claim the senior boys’ gold at the North Central District high school cross-country championships Wednesday.

http://www.paherald.sk.ca/index.cfm?sid=68550&sc=5

by NationTalk on October 5, 20071048 Views

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Vigil highlights plight of abused native women -CTV

Vigil highlights plight of abused native women

Updated Thu. Oct. 4 2007 7:05 PM ET
The Canadian Press

FORT Q’APPELLE, Sask. —

Gwenda Yuzicappi sleeps with the phone next to her pillow, anxiously waiting for word about her daughter Amber Redman.

Gwenda Yuzicappi sleeps with the phone next to her pillow, anxiously waiting for word about her daughter Amber Redman.

Redman was just 19 when she disappeared from Fort Qu’Appelle, Sask., more than two years ago, becoming one of the hundreds of missing or murdered native women and girls.

http://www.ctv.ca/servlet/ArticleNews/story/CTVNews/20071004/native_women_071004/20071004/

by NationTalk on October 5, 2007816 Views

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Do you have a permit for that photo? -Globe and Mail

Do you have a permit for that photo?
Photographer dumbfounded by Duncan’s policy that requires approval for taking pictures of the city’s 80 totem poles

SHANNON MONEO
October 4, 2007

VICTORIA — A Duncan, B.C., photographer is seeing red after being told he must get the green light before he can snap a picture of one of the city’s 80 totem poles.

“To ask for permission to take a photo of a totem pole ranks right up there with asking for permission to walk on the sidewalk,” said Len Langevin, president of the Cowichan Valley Camera Club. “I don’t know what they were thinking.”

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/story/LAC.20071004.BCTOTEM04/TPStory/?query=ABORIGINAL

by NationTalk on October 5, 2007971 Views

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Behchoko chief to file complaint over N.W.T. election fax -CBC

Behchoko chief to file complaint over N.W.T. election fax

Last Updated: Thursday, October 4, 2007
CBC News

The chief of Behchoko, N.W.T., says he will name Diavik Diamond Mines Inc. in a formal complaint to Elections N.W.T. over an anonymous fax sent from the company’s mine site on the day of the territory’s election.

Chief Leon Lafferty said Diavik’s acting president would not tell him in a meeting Wednesday which employee was responsible for the fax, which was sent from “Diavik Site Services” while the polls were open Monday.

http://www.cbc.ca/canada/nwtvotes2007/story/2007/10/04/nwtelex-lafferty.html

by NationTalk on October 5, 20071193 Views

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Women hold vigil against violence -Ottawa Sun

Thursday, 11:15 a.m.: Parliament Hill protest centres on native women and girls

A women’s group is holding a vigil on Parliament Hill to draw attention to the problem of violence against native women and girls.

Beverley Jacobs, president of the Aboriginal Women’s Association of Canada, says public awareness of the problem has increased in recent years, but more action is needed.

http://ottsun.canoe.ca/News/BreakingNews/2007/10/04/4549671.html

by NationTalk on October 4, 2007796 Views

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Scientist helps Nunavik say no to trans fats -CBC

Scientist helps Nunavik say no to trans fats

Last Updated: Thursday, October 4, 2007 | 10:02 AM CT
CBC News

Northern Quebec’s Nunavik region could soon be one of the first in Canada to ban trans fats, with the help of a Quebec researcher who says they cause health problems that are becoming a major concern in the North.

Trans fats, which are found in many processed foods and snacks available on store shelves, are being increasingly consumed among some Inuit and First Nations populations, said Dr. Eric Dewailly, a Laval University professor and research director with the Institute of Public Health in Quebec City.

http://www.cbc.ca/canada/north/story/2007/10/04/nvk-transfat.html

by NationTalk on October 4, 2007863 Views

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Federal Laws Could Eliminate Status Indians Over Time: Demographer -CBC

Federal laws could eliminate status Indians over time: demographer

Last Updated: Thursday, October 4, 2007 | 11:25 AM CT
CBC News

No status Indians could be left in Canada within 200 years if current laws defining who qualifies are not changed, according to a Winnipeg demographer.

Currently, federal legislation eliminates the treaty status of some children if one parent is a certain type of registered Indian and the other is not.

http://www.cbc.ca/canada/manitoba/story/2007/10/04/status-indians.html

by NationTalk on October 4, 2007897 Views

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Carving to Blame? -Winnipeg Sun

Carving to blame?
Lung disease among Inuit

By ROSS ROMANIUK, SUN MEDIA

It’s a leading-edge study into respiratory disease that has the University of Manitoba puffing out its chest.

U of M will soon lead what it calls a historic research project to determine whether soapstone carving, hunting and other cultural activities are causes of lung disease among Canada’s northern Inuit people — who are dying of the ailment at higher rates than any others across the country.

http://winnipegsun.com/News/Manitoba/2007/10/04/4548724-sun.html

by NationTalk on October 4, 2007902 Views

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Aboriginal Music Festival Boasts Eclectic Artist Lineup -StarPhoenix

Aboriginal music festival boasts eclectic artist lineup

Jessica Kiunga, Prince Albert Daily Herald
Published: Thursday, October 04, 2007

Where in the world can hip-hop, rap, traditional First Nations drumming, rock ‘n’ roll and country music be heard at one event?

Prince Albert, that’s where, and organizers of the Aboriginal Music and Arts Festival hope the event opens eyes and ears.

http://www.canada.com/saskatoonstarphoenix/news/lifestyle/story.html?id=cb4e0338-bfcd-4b0f-b030-a01c00106a7f

by NationTalk on October 4, 2007941 Views

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Native leader downplays report that says substance abuse … – The Chronicle

Native leader downplays report that says substance abuse problematic with payouts

WINNIPEG – Canada’s top First Nations leader may suggest it’s racist to question how residential school survivors spend their compensation cheques, but the national agency created to help the victims has raised the very same worries.

A recent report by the Aboriginal Healing Foundation, based on interviews with more than 100 people who had received cheques under earlier compensation agreements, says recipients saw many negative impacts.

http://www.westendchronicle.com/article-cp59550025-Native-leader-downplays-report-that-says-substance-abuse-problematic-with-payouts.html

by NationTalk on October 4, 2007815 Views

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Native group sponsors vigils to underline plight of aboriginal women (The Canadian Press)

Native group sponsors vigils to underline plight of aboriginal women

1 hour, 26 minutes ago
By Sue Bailey, The Canadian Press

OTTAWA – More than 30 vigils were held Thursday across the country to denounce a continuing epidemic of violence against aboriginal women.

Beverley Jacobs of the Native Women’s Association of Canada urged governments and police forces to craft national strategies as the ranks of the murdered and missing continue to grow. “Innocent women are being stolen from us every week as families are shattered and friendships lost,” Jacobs told a news conference on Parliament Hill.

http://ca.news.yahoo.com/s/capress/071004/national/missing_women_6

by NationTalk on October 4, 2007806 Views

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Helping students pick potential careers – Regina Leader-Post

Helping students pick potential careers

Kerry Benjoe, Leader-Post
Published: Thursday, October 04, 2007

The province announced Wednesday it’s spending almost $400,000 to help young people start planning for their careers.

“Today’s announcement is part of a larger action plan announced a few weeks ago. It’s called the Provincial Careers Development Action Plan for Saskatchewan Schools,” said Learning Minister Deb Higgins.

http://www.canada.com/reginaleaderpost/news/story.html?id=f5c75c21-9e28-4d99-89af-5a24b4229c35

by NationTalk on October 4, 2007859 Views

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RCMP seek help to find teen – Winnipeg Sun

RCMP seek help to find teen

Thu, October 4, 2007
By SUN MEDIA

RCMP in The Pas have again put out a call for tips to help them find a 15-year-old boy missing for more than a month.

Police said Clayton Joshua McKay’s family has not seen or heard from him since Aug. 20.

http://winnipegsun.com/News/Manitoba/2007/10/04/4548725-sun.html

by NationTalk on October 4, 20071058 Views

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Social, business, aboriginal leaders weigh in on new N.W.T. MLAs (CBC North)

Social, business, aboriginal leaders weigh in on new N.W.T. MLAs

Last Updated: Wednesday, October 3, 2007 | 2:22 PM MT
CBC News

With a new slate of MLAs chosen in Monday’s Northwest Territories election, a number of groups are now taking a closer look at who will be dealing with their concerns in government.

Six of the 19 MLAs are new to territorial politics, but four of them bring lengthy resumés in either public service or municipal politics. The remaining 13 MLAs were re-elected or acclaimed, including four cabinet ministers from the previous legislative assembly.

http://www.cbc.ca/canada/nwtvotes2007/story/2007/10/03/nwtelex-reax.html?ref=rss

by NationTalk on October 4, 2007927 Views

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Sarnia’s emissions affecting health, study says – Globe and Mail

Sarnia’s emissions affecting health, study says

MARTIN MITTELSTAEDT
ENVIRONMENT REPORTER
October 4, 2007

Sarnia is fabled as Canada’s chemical valley because of its many petroleum plants, but a new study says the community’s industrial prosperity has a dark side: The area is the most polluted in Ontario when it comes to smokestack emissions.

The study, by Ecojustice Canada, an environmental group, also makes the controversial assertion that pollution is so severe in the city and a nearby native reserve that the health of the 130,000 people living in the area is being harmed due to exposure to such harmful substances as mercury, dioxins and volatile organic compounds.

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/story/LAC.20071004.TOXIC04/TPStory/TPNational/Ontario/

by NationTalk on October 4, 2007903 Views

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Seeking space for GAPS – Labradorian

Seeking space for GAPS
Furniture donation committee scouting new location for goods

KENN OLIVER
The Labradorian

It’s one of those little programs that have had a big impact on the local community.

Giving Assistance Partnership Services (GAPS) is a local committee made up of members from other non-profit organizations such as the Aboriginal Family Centre and the Mokami Status of Women Council.

http://www.thelabradorian.ca/index.cfm?sid=67719&sc=347

by NationTalk on October 3, 2007909 Views

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Sharing the story of missing sister -Gazette

Sharing the story of missing sister

By Monisha Martins
Black Press
Oct 03 2007

Barely blinking her almond-shaped eyes, Sandra Gagnon reveals how time has whittled down her family.

Of 10 siblings who grew up in the Nimpkish First Nation near the misty coves of Alert Bay, just three are left.

http://www.northislandgazette.com/portals-code/list.cgi?paper=21&cat=23&id=1075039&more=0

by NationTalk on October 3, 2007861 Views

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Native fishermen in NB challenge limitations of salmon fishing rights -Canoe.ca

Native fishermen in N.B. challenge limitations of salmon fishing rights

By THE CANADIAN PRESS

FREDERICTON – A First Nations community in New Brunswick is challenging limitations on aboriginal fishing rights in the Miramichi River, one of the most popular salmon angling rivers in North America.

Gina Brooks of the St. Mary’s Reserve in Fredericton says members of the community will continue to jig salmon in the river for a food fishery despite being subjected to what she described as racist insults and rock throwing by angry Miramichi property owners.

http://cnews.canoe.ca/CNEWS/Canada/2007/10/03/4547100-cp.html

by NationTalk on October 3, 20071123 Views

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Frontenac Ventures lawsuit involves only First Nations -Toronto Star

Frontenac Ventures lawsuit involves only First Nations

Oct 02, 2007 03:52 PM

Frontenac Ventures has not sued the Ontario government. Its lawsuit names only the First Nations. Dave Brown and Dana Chatwell have launched a $12 million lawsuit against the OPP and the province. Incorrect information was pub-lished in a Sept. 27 column about Indian land claim disputes.

The Star regrets the errors.

http://www.thestar.com/Corrections/article/262540

by NationTalk on October 3, 2007852 Views

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Premier, chiefs to summit on hunting issue -Whitehorse Star

Premier, chiefs to summit on hunting issue

By Chuck Tobin

A meeting of the Yukon’s three northern chiefs and the premier is scheduled for this evening to discuss the contentious removal of caribou hunting restrictions along the Dempster Highway.

Chief Joe Linklater of the Vuntut Gwitchin First Nation said Monday afternoon he’s not sure what will come of the meeting.
It will involve Chief Darren Taylor of Dawson City’s Tr’ondek Hwech’in First Nation, Chief Mervyn Simon of Mayo’s First Nation of Na-cho Nyak Dun and Premier Dennis Fentie.
Linklater expressed grave concern last week over the government’s removal of the 500-metre, no-hunting corridor and the one-week hunting closure to let the leaders of the herd pass once they reach the highway.

http://www.whitehorsestar.com/auth.php?r=48703

by NationTalk on October 3, 20071061 Views

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Algonquins offer to end uranium site occupation -CBC

Algonquins offer to end uranium site occupation

Last Updated: Tuesday, October 2, 2007 | 5:35 PM ET
CBC News

Two First Nations communities have offered to end their three-month occupation of a potential uranium site in eastern Ontario if the province agrees to help resolve its dispute with a mining exploration company.

Chief Doreen Davis of the Shabot Obaadjiwan First Nation and Paula Sherman, co-chief of the Ardoch Algonquin First Nation, sent a letter to Premier Dalton McGuinty on Tuesday asked for mediation involving themselves and provincial and federal government representatives.

http://www.cbc.ca/canada/ottawa/story/2007/10/02/ot-uranium-071002.html?ref=rss

by NationTalk on October 3, 20071016 Views

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Northern Alberta reserve taking province to court over oilsands -Calgary Sun

Northern Alberta reserve taking province to court over oilsands

UPDATED: 2007-10-03 02:51:55 MST
By CP

The Woodland Cree First Nation of northwestern Alberta launched legal action yesterday against the province, arguing it should be consulted before any oilsands leases are sold on traditional lands.

The lawsuit also seeks a halt to the Alberta regulator’s approval of Shell’s Carmon Creek project — the first major development in the Peace River oilsands deposit.

http://calsun.canoe.ca/Business/2007/10/03/4545563-sun.html

by NationTalk on October 3, 2007802 Views

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Woodland Cree asks court to block oil sands project -Globe and Mail

Woodland Cree asks court to block oil sands project

DAVID EBNER
October 3, 2007

The Woodland Cree First Nation, home to about 1,000 aboriginals located in northwestern Alberta, have filed an application with the Court of Queen’s Bench in Calgary against the Alberta government to block a Royal Dutch Shell PLC oil sands project near their land. The Woodland Cree believe Alberta has not conducted meaningful consultation with aboriginals over the granting of oil and natural gas development leases. The Woodland Cree are specifically worried about total development plans in their region. Shell has about 12,500 barrels a day of oil sands production in northwestern Alberta, which it hopes to increase to about 100,000 b/d.

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/story/LAC.20071003.RTICK03-6/TPStory/?query=ABORIGINAL

by NationTalk on October 3, 2007846 Views

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U.S. researcher gets grant to fight diabetes -CTV

U.S. researcher gets grant to fight diabetes

Updated Wed. Oct. 3 2007 8:47 AM ET
The Associated Press

OKLAHOMA CITY — A researcher at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center received a $6.6 million grant to help fight diabetes, particularly among the state’s American Indian population.

An estimated 60,000 American Indians in Oklahoma have diabetes. To address this issue, the National Institutes of Health awarded the five-year grant on Monday to OU researcher J. Neil Henderson to establish the Oklahoma Center for American Indian Diabetes Health Disparities. OU health practitioners will focus primarily on the impact of diabetes on maternal health, infant mortality and obesity.

http://www.ctv.ca/servlet/ArticleNews/story/CTVNews/20071003/diabetes_research_071003/20071003/

by NationTalk on October 3, 2007758 Views

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Lutsel K’e fights for voice in N.W.T. election -CBC

Lutsel K’e fights for voice in N.W.T. election

Last Updated: Tuesday, October 2, 2007 | 4:46 PM MT
CBC News

Lutsel K’e voted as a community to back their local candidate in the Northwest Territories election on Monday, residents say.

The move, a first for the community of about 320, located 185 kilometres southeast of Yellowknife, was an effort to elect the candidate of their choice, Steve Ellis, as the MLA in the Tu Nedhe district. The vast majority of ballots in the community were marked for Ellis, although official numbers are not yet available.

http://www.cbc.ca/canada/nwtvotes2007/story/2007/10/02/nwtelex-lutselke.html

by NationTalk on October 3, 20071121 Views

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