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The North “like Darfur” -CMAJ

Poverty and human development
The North “like Darfur”

Ann Silversides
Toronto

Most of the time, Nick Finney’s job is to respond to rapid-onset humanitarian disasters — floods, earthquakes and health emergencies. But in First Nations communities in northern Canada last winter he witnessed “the slowest evolved disaster that I’ve ever worked in.”

Finney, based in Britain, is Save the Children’s acting head of emergency capacity. He was invited by the remote communities to visit and conduct international aid–style assessments. “At first, it seemed like my work in Kenya after the flood — creating a multidisciplinary team of locals and others, taking a plane to remote communities,” he said in a telephone interview from London. “But this disaster goes back to the last century. The level of deprivation is truly shocking. We visited a damp, 1-bedroom house with a family of 25 living in it.”

http://www.cmaj.ca/cgi/content/full/177/9/1013?ct

by NationTalk on October 23, 2007907 Views

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Maa-nulth pact faces clear sailing at legislature -Times Colonist

Maa-nulth pact faces clear sailing at legislature
Liberals and NDP both support treaty worth up to $500 million, but federal election could delay Tsawwassen and west Island deals

Jeff Rud, Times Colonist
Published: Tuesday, October 23, 2007

Provincial politicians are preparing to debate a second treaty agreement during the current sitting of the legislature, now that the Maa-nulth First Nations have voted strongly in favour of their deal.

Aboriginal Affairs and Reconciliation Minister Mike de Jong said yesterday his government plans to introduce ratification legislation similar to that introduced for the Tsawwassen treaty last week.

http://www.canada.com/victoriatimescolonist/news/story.html?id=b88eb6af-7107-426e-b225-5961bcae39cb

by NationTalk on October 23, 2007832 Views

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Much work ahead in treaty process: Minister -Globe and Mail

Much work ahead in treaty process: Minister

ROD MICKLEBURGH
October 23, 2007

VANCOUVER — Aboriginal Relations Minister Mike de Jong said yesterday that the provincial government is under no illusion the latest native treaty is a breakthrough for the laborious process that has spent a billion dollars over 14 years with only two agreements to show for it.

“Do we interpret [the weekend’s treaty acceptance by the Maa-nulth First Nations] as meaning all the stars have aligned and a quick successful end to the treaty process is now in sight? No,” said Mr. de Jong.

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/story/LAC.20071023.BCTREATY23/TPStory/National

by NationTalk on October 23, 2007852 Views

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First Nations Want a Stop to Building Permits for Subdivision; Developer Agrees… -The Sun Times

First Nations want a stop to building permits for subdivision; Developer agrees to indemnify municipality for legal actions by bands

Posted By By PHIL McNICHOL
Posted 10 hours ago

Northern Bruce Peninsula council has taken steps to protect itself and its ratepayers from the cost of any legal actions after refusing a Saugeen Ojibwa request that it stop issuing building permits for a subdivision on the Lake Huron shoreline.

The municipality and the developer of the Greenough Harbour subdivision, in the Stokes Bay area, have signed an indemnification agreement obligating the developer to cover the cost of any “claims or proceedings” taken by the Saugeen Ojibwa as a result of the municipality’s continued issuance of building permits “for any of the lots” up to a cost of $25,000.

http://www.owensoundsuntimes.com/ArticleDisplay.aspx?e=745088&auth=By+PHIL+McNICHOL

by NationTalk on October 23, 2007864 Views

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Aboriginals not Central in Throne Speech -The Leader-Post

Aboriginals not central in throne speech

Doug Cuthand, The Leader-Post
Published: Monday, October 22, 2007

The speech from the throne is hyped by the media as the last word from the government of the day when in reality it is only the first. Normally throne speeches are treated as statements in which the government puts forward its agenda for the coming session of Parliament and not something that holds the confidence of the government in power.

Throne speeches are followed by the details and legislation and it is at this point where the confidence of the government is on the line. Prime Minister Stephen Harper has made the throne speech an issue of confidence that could take the country to an election nobody, except for a few political junkies, wants.

http://www.canada.com/reginaleaderpost/news/city_province/story.html?id=6d30db5a-b787-409a-9741-5c76279df954

by NationTalk on October 23, 2007912 Views

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Aboriginal Literature Awards Handed out -The StarPhoenix

Aboriginal literature awards handed out

The StarPhoenix
Published: Monday, October 22, 2007

The Ânskohk Aboriginal Literature Festival announced winners in four categories and gave out the Lifetime Achievement Award on Friday night in Saskatoon. The festival is sponsored by the Saskatchewan Native Theatre Company.

The Lifetime Achievement Award was presented to Basil Johnston, a respected author, storyteller and preserver of the Anishinaubae language. Johnston has written more than 20 books, a novel and numerous articles for newspapers, anthologies and periodicals. He worked at the Royal Ontario Museum from 1970 to 1994 in the department of ethnology, is a history teacher and has lectured at various universities and colleges across Canada. He has also been inducted into the Order of Canada, won the 2004 National Aboriginal Achievement Award and has honorary doctorates from the University of Toronto and Laurentian University.

http://www.canada.com/saskatoonstarphoenix/news/lifestyle/story.html?id=c85a83b3-9b5d-43c9-a886-9a8acb8640a2

by NationTalk on October 23, 2007820 Views

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Cultures and Caribou Explored Together -StarPhoenix

Cultures and caribou explored together

Wendy Gillis, The StarPhoenix
Published: Monday, October 22, 2007

In her study of Saskatchewan’s woodland caribou, University of Saskatchewan biology master’s student Naomi Carriere is not only working toward the preservation of a species at risk, she’s challenging the way it has traditionally been done.

Originally from the Cumberland House Métis community, Carriere combines her scientific education with her aboriginal heritage to create a unique approach to the study of woodland caribou, a species currently threatened in Saskatchewan.

http://www.canada.com/saskatoonstarphoenix/news/story.html?id=2433ba7f-b218-4151-9c4a-0385e8e70710

by NationTalk on October 23, 2007764 Views

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Private Member’s Bill Designed to Protect First Nations Cultural Sites -Times Colonist

Private member’s bill designed to protect First Nations cultural sites

Rob Shaw, Victoria Times Colonist
Published: Monday, October 22, 2007

The provincial opposition will try to reform B.C.’s much-criticized Heritage Conservation Act today by introducing a private member’s bill designed to push the government into helping cover the cost of protecting First Nations cultural sites threatened by development.

The bill proposes modernizing government laws that First Nations groups have called ineffective in preserving their spiritual places and grave sites, said NDP MLA Maurine Karagianis (Esquimalt-Metchosin). Thousands of such sites dot the B.C. coastline.

http://www.canada.com/victoriatimescolonist/news/story.html?id=d08602e5-fd60-46de-9852-b162d3c901c5&k=5920

by NationTalk on October 23, 2007779 Views

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Opposition planning heritage act changes to ease natives’ fears -The Province

Opposition planning heritage act changes to ease natives’ fears

The Province
Published: Monday, October 22, 2007

The opposition will try to reform B.C.’s much-criticized Heritage Conservation Act today by introducing a private member’s bill designed to push the government into helping cover the cost of protecting First Nations cultural sites threatened by development.

The bill proposes modernizing laws that First Nations groups have called ineffective in preserving their spiritual places and gravesites, said NDP MLA Maurine Karagianis (Esquimalt-Metchosin).

http://www.canada.com/theprovince/news/story.html?id=1a810f16-0346-436c-b2aa-ecc4479d59e4

by NationTalk on October 23, 2007724 Views

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The East Has Seen Positive Projects, Too -Daily News

The east has seen positive projects, too

CANDY PALMATER

This is the fourth story in a five-part series by Candy Palmater. It explores the Mi’kmaq nation specifically and matters affecting aboriginal people in general and will appear in The Daily News every Monday of Mi’kmaq History Month this October. This week: aboriginal rights

When I watch the national and local news, I often see stories about aboriginal people, but rarely do those stories take place here on the East Coast. If we were to believe what we see in the media, we would think the only positive activity is happening on the West Coast.

http://www.hfxnews.ca/index.cfm?sid=73320&sc=89

by NationTalk on October 23, 2007673 Views

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‘Turn the heat down’ -Canada.com

‘Turn the heat down’
Even though she lost the Nobel Peace Prize to Al Gore, Inuit activist Sheila Watt-Cloutier’s own climate change battles are getting their day in the sun

Emanuel Lowi, The Ottawa Citizen
Published: Sunday, October 21, 2007

It’s a long way from a traditional Inuit upbringing on the banks of the Koksoak River in Quebec’s Nunavik region to the corridors of power at the U.S. Capitol and around the world. But it’s a distance traversed many times by Inuit leader and climate-change activist Sheila Watt-Cloutier.

http://www.canada.com/ottawacitizen/news/story.html?id=e9f90b3e-bd6c-4959-9435-9601e459cec7

by NationTalk on October 22, 2007892 Views

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Kusugak stepping down as Nunavut language commissioner -cbc

Kusugak stepping down as Nunavut language commissioner
Announcement made during hearings into proposed language laws

Last Updated: Monday, October 22, 2007 | 8:53 AM CT
CBC News

Nunavut’s language commissioner, Johnny Kusugak, says he will step down at the end of this year.

He made the announcement in Iqaluit on Friday during committee hearings into two proposed language bills aimed at protecting and strengthening the Inuit languages.

http://www.cbc.ca/canada/north/story/2007/10/22/kusugak-lang.html

by NationTalk on October 22, 2007949 Views

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Montreal’s Jewish community honours Mohawk war hero who helped liberate Dachau (The Canadian Press)

Montreal’s Jewish community honours Mohawk war hero who helped liberate Dachau

Sun Oct 21, 6:13 PM
By Jonathan Montpetit, The Canadian Press

KAHNAWAKE, Que. – Wearing yarmulkes and rows of shinny medals, Jewish Second World War veterans and Holocaust survivors alike made a pilgrimage Sunday to the grave of a modest aboriginal war hero.

Michael Delisle Sr. was among the first to enter the Dachau concentration camp after its liberation, and on the first anniversary of his death Montreal’s Jewish community joined Mohawks to honour the exploits he never like to talk about.

http://ca.news.yahoo.com/s/capress/071021/national/holocaust_aboriginal_hero_2

by NationTalk on October 22, 2007921 Views

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Fire Causes Panic On First Nation – 980 CJME

Fire Causes Panic On First Nation
October 21, 2007

The Stoughton fire department had their hands full Sunday night with a grass fire on a reserve in southeastern saskatchewan…

RCMP telling us the source of the fire on the Ocean Man First Nation was likely a vehicle in the field.

http://www.newstalk980.com/index.php?p=ntnews&action=view_story&id=10331

by NationTalk on October 22, 2007986 Views

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Maa-Nulth Approve Treaty – Westcoaster

Maa-Nulth Approve Treaty

Five West Vancouver Island First Nations have voted in favour of a treaty settlement with the provincial and federal governments.

Sunday in Port Alberni, the Ucluelet, Toquaht, Uchucklesaht, and Kyuquot First Nations approved the Maa-nulth treaty, which will give five nations a capital transfer of $73.1 million, annual resource royalty payments averaging $1.2 million for 25 years and a land transfer totaling approximately 24,551 hectares.

http://www.westcoaster.ca/modules/AMS/article.php?storyid=2825

by NationTalk on October 22, 20071805 Views

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Government boats bypass Hollow Water blockade – Winnipeg Sun

Government boats bypass Hollow Water blockade

Conservation officers used boats to ferry approximately 25 cottagers to developments near Hollow Water First Nation yesterday so they could winterize their cabins.

Earl Simmons, chief natural resource officer with Manitoba Conservation, said six patrol vessels were used to transport people to four different cottage developments that can’t be reached by road because of blockades set up by the Hollow Water reserve last month.

http://winnipegsun.com/News/Manitoba/2007/10/21/4592807-sun.html

by NationTalk on October 22, 20071059 Views

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Time eroding pictograph heritage of Churchill River -CBC

Time eroding pictograph heritage of Churchill River

Last Updated: Saturday, October 20, 2007 | 3:45 PM ET
CBC News

Ancient aboriginal pictographs — some of them thousands of years old — are slowly disappearing in Canada’s North, the victims of time and erosion.

Cree canoeing the Churchill River created the rock paintings along their traditional water routes.

http://www.cbc.ca/arts/artdesign/story/2007/10/20/pictographs-fading.html?ref=rss

by NationTalk on October 22, 2007843 Views

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Grieving community seeks closure -CNews

Grieving community seeks closure

By THANE BURNETT
The Toronto Sun

SUMMER BEAVER, Ont. — Johnny Yellowhead walks deep into the north woods, to once again find one of Canada’s most isolated graveyards.

What he wants — what many in his nearby First Nation village of Summer Beaver (Nibinamik), Ont., still pray for these four years later — is a road to their dead.

http://cnews.canoe.ca/CNEWS/Canada/2007/10/21/4593884-sun.html

by NationTalk on October 22, 2007809 Views

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On the land -Globe and Mail

On the land

JOE FRIESEN
From Saturday’s Globe and Mail
October 20, 2007 at 12:16 AM EDT

HEADQUARTERS The Canadian Forces Joint Task Force North has 125 staff at headquarters in Yellowknife, and a further 40 stationed at 440 Squadron, where they maintain the four Twin Otter aircraft. About 70 personnel are stationed at Alert, in the high Arctic, where they do signals intelligence and maintain an airfield. Prime Minister Stephen Harper recently announced that an Arctic training facility will be established at Resolute Bay.

RANGERS Headquarters of the First Canadian Ranger Patrol Group, above, are also in Yellowknife. The army of 1,500 in the three northern territories are primarily Inuit and aboriginal reservists, from 54 communities, who conduct patrols in remote regions and report any suspicious activity to Canadian Forces headquarters. They are equipped with .303 bolt-action rifles and high-frequency radios, and do most of their winter patrols on snowmobiles. With their distinctive red caps and red-hooded sweaters, they are the only segment of the Canadian Forces that elects its leaders. In the past, the Rangers have spotted foreign submarines and a team of frogmen, suspected to have been deployed off a French sub sitting in Canadian waters.

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/story/RTGAM.20071020.arctic-land20/BNStory/National/

by NationTalk on October 22, 20071033 Views

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Natives block construction to protest claim -Globe and Mail

Natives block construction to protest claim
Provincial negotiator says Six Nations can’t force fees on developers

KATE HARRIES
Special to The Globe and Mail
October 20, 2007

OSHWEKEN, ONT. — A one-day protest that shut down construction at a Brantford development site yesterday was a defiant reply to Ontario’s declaration that the Six Nations Confederacy has no right to levy special charges on developers on disputed lands in the south of the province.

On Wednesday, provincial negotiator Murray Coolican told Confederacy representatives that it is illegal for the recently created Haudenosaunee Development Institute to extract concessions or payments from private landowners.

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/story/LAC.20071020.NATIVE20/TPStory/?query=ABORIGINAL

by NationTalk on October 22, 2007919 Views

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Protesters end blockade -Globe and Mail

Protesters end blockade

BILL CURRY
October 20, 2007

Aboriginal protesters and their supporters have agreed to end their blockade of a uranium mining site north of Kingston.

Robert Lovelace, who is of Algonquin descent and is a spokesman for the group, said the move is a show of good faith after the Ontario government’s agreement to 12 weeks of mediation in search of a solution. “The direct action was important and I think very successful,” Mr. Lovelace said yesterday of the protest, which began in early summer.

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/story/LAC.20071020.NATIVEURANIUM20/TPStory/?query=ABORIGINAL

by NationTalk on October 22, 2007749 Views

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Forest Service returns ancient remains of Native Amerian to … – San Diego Union Tribune

Forest Service returns ancient remains of Native Amerian to Tlingit tribes in Alaska

By Rachel D’oro
ASSOCIATED PRESS
2:42 a.m. October 20, 2007

ANCHORAGE, Alaska – Human remains estimated to be more than 10,000 years old that were found in a cave in the Tongass National Forest rightfully belong to the southeast Alaska Tlingit tribes, the federal government said.

Now, 11 years after they were found during a U.S. Forest Service archaeological survey, the remains will be returned to the tribe, agency officials announced Friday. It will be the first time a federal agency has handed custody of such ancient finds over to an indigenous group under the 1990 Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act, they said.

http://www.signonsandiego.com/news/nation/20071020-0242-tlingitremains.html

by NationTalk on October 20, 2007991 Views

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Mining company, natives reach truce; Move follows promise from … – The Kingston Whig-Standard

Mining company, natives reach truce; Move follows promise from government to discuss land claim with Algonquins

Posted By Frank Armstrong
Posted 9 hours ago

The Algonquins who have occupied the site of a proposed uranium mine north of Sharbot Lake for almost four months have all but vacated.

Members of the Ardoch Algonquin and Shabot Obaadjiwan First Nations have moved all of their people from the property that is being prospected for uranium by Oakville-based Frontenac Ventures, said Lynn Daniluk, a spokeswoman for local non-Aboriginals who have been supporting the native protest.

http://www.thewhig.com/ArticleDisplay.aspx?e=742887&auth=Frank+Armstrong

by NationTalk on October 20, 2007786 Views

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Aboriginal protesters block building site – London Free Press

Aboriginal protesters block building site

Sat, October 20, 2007
By CP

BRANTFORD — Six Nations protesters temporarily halted the construction of a $40-million shopping centre here yesterday with a 12-hour demonstration.

The peaceful protest was in reaction to a provincial statement made Thursday that a new Six Nations development institute has no right to charge fees or demand permits for construction on lands on either side of the Grand River.

http://lfpress.ca/newsstand/CityandRegion/2007/10/20/4591046-sun.html

by NationTalk on October 20, 2007809 Views

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Aboriginal leader concerned about youth violence (CBC Manitoba)

Aboriginal leader concerned about youth violence

Last Updated: Friday, October 19, 2007 | 1:07 PM CT
CBC News

Manitoba’s top aboriginal leaders are meeting with the mayor of Winnipeg Friday to discuss youth crime.

The rise in violence among aboriginal youth has to stop, said the head of the Assembly of Manitoba Chiefs.

http://www.cbc.ca/canada/manitoba/story/2007/10/19/man-youth.html?ref=rss

by NationTalk on October 20, 2007854 Views

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Native protesters leave uranium mine (Montreal Gazette)

Native protesters leave uranium mine

The Gazette
Published: 11 hours ago

Protesting First Nations groups yesterday began vacating a prospective uranium mining area in eastern Ontario, clearing the way for exploration to begin on the site, following months of demonstration-related delays.

http://www.canada.com/montrealgazette/news/story.html?id=d20d9261-dd36-4d9a-a985-853c2bf3ebdf&k=24664

by NationTalk on October 20, 2007655 Views

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Housing a `national crisis,’ UN envoy says (Toronto Star)

Housing a `national crisis,’ UN envoy says
Official hosts forum as part of two-week fact-finding mission

Oct 20, 2007 04:30 AM
Joanna Smith
Staff Reporter

Tears brim behind her glasses as Patricia Cummings-Diaz recounts the years of “hell” that saw the single mother drag her three children from shelter to homeless shelter.

Her daughter was attacked more than once. They all experienced malnutrition and fear. “That’s what happens when you cattle the poor,” she said.

http://www.thestar.com/article/268755

by NationTalk on October 20, 2007890 Views

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Curve Lake expansion plan still meets resistance – Kawartha Media Group

Curve Lake expansion plan still meets resistance

Date: 2007-10-20
Author: Lindsey Cole

Inside the little red brick church on Saturday, 50 people sat, each waiting.

Waiting for an update, and waiting for their chance to speak, on three controversial issues stemming from Curve Lake First Nations’ application to expand its land holdings.

http://www.mykawartha.com/article/20776

by NationTalk on October 20, 2007980 Views

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Aboriginal youth are the future of this country – The Daily News

Last updated at 6:44 AM on 20/10/07

Aboriginal youth are the future of this country

October is Mi’kmaq History Month in Nova Scotia. Some of you may be reading my special series running each Monday of this month in this paper. Each of the articles focuses on an aspect of being aboriginal. Most of the subject matter however, is very adult focused.

This week, I had the privilege of being reminded of what can happen when we take time to engage our youth. Some very talented students of the Wagmatcook First Nation (near Baddeck, in Cape Breton) have created some art work that is being displayed in the corridor of the Art Gallery of Nova Scotia.

http://www.hfxnews.ca/index.cfm?sid=73021&sc=93

by NationTalk on October 20, 2007875 Views

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Summit builds ‘united front’ – Timmins Daily Press

Summit builds ‘united front’

Posted By Michael Peeling
Posted 4 hours ago

A two-day summit of key figures in Northern Ontario concluded as a “good start” towards creating a common voice for 110 communities, but there is still a lot work to be done, according to some delegates.

Alan Spacek, Northern Leaders’ Economic Summit co-organizer and mayor of Kapuskasing and one of 208 delegates at the summit, said the series of presentations and breakout sessions on topics such as energy, health, education, natural resources, transportation and other issues prominent in the area went a long way toward building a “united front” for Northern Ontario to deal with other levels of government. But he said there was the conspicuous absence of First Nations leaders and other key stakeholders in the future of the North.

http://www.timminspress.com/ArticleDisplay.aspx?e=742657&auth=Michael+Peeling

by NationTalk on October 20, 20071218 Views

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Dion tries on his running-for-PM shoes – Winnipeg Free Press

Dion tries on his running-for-PM shoes

Sat Oct 20 2007
By Joe Paraskevas

FORT ALEXANDER — Stéphane Dion sounded like a man on the campaign trail Friday.

The federal Liberal party leader, who this week assured Canadians he would not defeat the Conservative minority government and provoke an election, acted like a politician looking for a fight.

http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/local/story/4061424p-4665127c.html

by NationTalk on October 20, 2007801 Views

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‘Napa North’ – StarPhoenix

‘Napa North’
Osoyoos aspires to be enjoyed as a four-seasons destination

Kathy McCormick, CanWest News Service
Published: Saturday, October 20, 2007

OSOYOOS, B.C. — Osoyoos is in a transformation, going from a small tourist destination where the focus was on beer, cherries and sunshine, to a full-out, year-round spot that has an upscale, exotic appeal, says the executive director of Destination Osoyoos.

“Now there are 60 to 70 wineries here (in and around the town) and the focus of developers is to create a four-season destination,” says Glenn Mandziuk. “It’s amazing to see how that has lifted the whole area. Eco-tourism, too, is big. People want to enjoy the beach, but they want to get off there and have more experiences.”

http://www.canada.com/saskatoonstarphoenix/news/weekend_extra/story.html?id=c37d591e-86b8-46c4-a8f9-28640588ec00

by NationTalk on October 20, 2007896 Views

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Province to take cottagers around native blockade – Edmonton Journal

Province to take cottagers around native blockade

CanWest News Service
Published: 2:06 am

WINNIPEG – Manitoba Conservation will ferry cottagers across Lake Winnipeg this weekend so they can gain access to their properties, which have been out of reach since a native blockade went up about a month ago.

The blockade was erected by Hollow Water First Nation because the band says it was not consulted before the province auctioned off cottage lots on Hollow Water traditional land.

http://www.canada.com/edmontonjournal/news/story.html?id=51cf45df-200f-46d2-b1e6-a9fd5d47e44b

by NationTalk on October 20, 2007727 Views

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Road to the dead – Canoe.ca

Road to the dead

The grieving has gone on for four long years as the community of Summer Beaver seeks closure

SUMMER BEAVER, Ont. — Johnny Yellowhead walks deep into the north woods, to once again find one of Canada’s most isolated graveyards.

What he wants — what many in his nearby First Nation village of Summer Beaver (Nibinamik), Ont., still pray for these four years later — is a road to their dead.

http://ottsun.canoe.ca/News/National/2007/10/20/4590724-sun.html

by NationTalk on October 20, 2007715 Views

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Landlord fined over First Nations comments -CBC

Landlord fined over First Nations comments

Last Updated: Friday, October 19, 2007 | 4:28 PM CT
CBC News

A Prince Albert landlord must pay $2,000 for making a hurtful remark about First Nations people to one of his tenants.

In 2002, the Saskatchewan Human Rights Commission took up the case of Marjorie Starr, who complained her rights were violated by the comments of Glenn Olsen and his company, Karcher Holdings Ltd.

http://www.cbc.ca/canada/saskatchewan/story/2007/10/19/indians-comments.html

by NationTalk on October 20, 2007814 Views

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Flick: Our weekly take on movies -Toronto Star

Flick: Our weekly take on movies

Oct 19, 2007 04:30 AM

Elijah Harper is expected to be in the audience tomorrow night for Toronto premiere of Elijah, screening as part of the 8th annual imagineNATIVE Film and Media Arts Festival.

Billy Merasty plays the title role in the CTV made-for-TV biopic of Manitoba’s Harper, the aboriginal MLA who made history for his stand on the Meech Lake Accord.

http://www.thestar.com/article/268394

by NationTalk on October 20, 2007868 Views

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Healing, youth focus of Yukon residential school conference -CBC

Healing, youth focus of Yukon residential school conference

Last Updated: Friday, October 19, 2007 | 10:32 AM CT
CBC News

Former residential school students attending a conference in Whitehorse this week say they want children and youth to get involved in the healing process.

Up to 450 people packed the gym at Yukon College for the three-day conference, which concluded Thursday.

http://www.cbc.ca/canada/north/story/2007/10/19/yk-conference.html

by NationTalk on October 20, 2007793 Views

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New molybdenum mine to hire B.C., Yukon workers -CBC

New molybdenum mine to hire B.C., Yukon workers

Last Updated: Friday, October 19, 2007 | 5:25 PM CT
CBC News

A Vancouver company building a new molybdenum mine near Atlin, B.C., says it will look to northern British Columbia and the Yukon for hiring hundreds of workers this winter.

Adanac Molybdenum Corp. has started construction of an open-pit mine 24 kilometres northeast of Atlin at Ruby Creek, B.C.

http://www.cbc.ca/canada/north/story/2007/10/19/atlin-mine.html

by NationTalk on October 20, 2007871 Views

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Make Nunavut language bills tougher, groups tell committee -CBC

Make Nunavut language bills tougher, groups tell committee

Last Updated: Friday, October 19, 2007 | 3:00 PM CT
CBC News

Nunavummiut who appeared before a legislative committee Thursday on Nunavut’s proposed language laws said they have to do more to protect the Inuit languages.

The Ajauqtiit standing committee began hearings Thursday into Bill 6, which would create a new official languages act, and Bill 7, known as the Inuit language protection act. Both passed first and second reading in Nunavut’s legislative assembly earlier this year.

http://www.cbc.ca/canada/north/story/2007/10/19/nu-lang.html

by NationTalk on October 20, 2007770 Views

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New Iqaluit hospital officially opens -CBC

New Iqaluit hospital officially opens

Last Updated: Friday, October 19, 2007 | 4:21 PM CT
CBC News

Nunavut leaders celebrated the opening of Iqaluit’s new hospital Friday, but the territory’s health minister warned that it will face challenges recruiting nurses and other medical staff for the facility.

Health Minister Leona Aglukkaq and Premier Paul Okalik opened the new Qikiqtani General Hospital in a ceremony Friday morning.

http://www.cbc.ca/canada/north/story/2007/10/19/iqa-hospital.html

by NationTalk on October 20, 2007924 Views

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PM’s use of aboriginal front group may backfire -StarPhoenix

PM’s use of aboriginal front group may backfire

Doug Cuthand, Special to The StarPhoenix
Published: Friday, October 19, 2007

The speech from the throne has been hyped by media as the last word from the government of the day, when in reality it’s only the first.

Throne speeches are treated as statements where the ruling party outlines its agenda for the coming session and not a test of parliamentary members’ confidence in the government. The speech is followed by the details and legislation, and it is at this point where confidence in the government is on the line.

http://www.canada.com/saskatoonstarphoenix/columnists/story.html?id=0136b6d8-1ce5-42da-9525-004c963cbaf7

by NationTalk on October 20, 2007776 Views

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MNS Calls for Agreement on Hunting, Fishing Rights -StarPhoenix

MNS calls for agreement on hunting, fishing rights

Saskatchewan News Network; Regina Leader-Post
Published: Friday, October 19, 2007

REGINA (SNN) — The Metis Nation-Saskatchewan (MNS) is calling for a provincewide agreement that recognizes and respects Metis hunting and fishing rights.

“It is time for the government of Saskatchewan to sit down and honorably negotiate an agreement with the MNS that recognizes and accommodates Metis harvesting rights throughout the province, rather than continuing to charge and prosecute Metis harvesters at great expense to our people and Saskatchewan taxpayers,” Metis Nation-Saskatchewan president Robert Doucette told reporters Thursday.

http://www.canada.com/saskatoonstarphoenix/news/local/story.html?id=54e1ca78-1eb2-474c-9a04-cdf6386b0ff3

by NationTalk on October 20, 2007867 Views

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MGM Communications, Siemens Partner in First Nations Initiative -StarPhoenix

MGM Communications, Siemens partner in First Nations initiative

The StarPhoenix
Published: Friday, October 19, 2007

A Saskatoon-based company has partnered with Siemens Canada Ltd. to develop a communications strategy that targets First Nations communities in Saskatchewan.

MGM Communications, an advertising and marketing agency that is majority owned by the Battlefords Tribal Council, announced Thursday it will provide creative services such as public relations and media placement for Siemens Canada.

http://www.canada.com/saskatoonstarphoenix/news/business/story.html?id=fb1b758b-8b4b-46f4-b3ea-dbdb800c1f52

by NationTalk on October 20, 2007909 Views

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Activists breached seal hunt rules, officer testifies -CBC

Activists breached seal hunt rules, officer testifies
Defence lawyer plans to rebut evidence

Last Updated: Friday, October 19, 2007 | 6:09 AM CT
CBC News

The Crown called just one witness in a case against five activists it says disrupted the seal hunt off Canada’s east coast in 2006.

Two Canadians, two Americans and a British citizen — all with the Humane Society of the United States and its affiliate, Humane Society International — are charged with violating marine mammal regulations.

http://www.cbc.ca/canada/north/story/2007/10/19/seal-hunt.html

by NationTalk on October 19, 2007887 Views

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New NWT premier promises assertive style -Globe and Mail

New NWT premier promises assertive style

BOB WEBER
The Canadian Press
October 18, 2007

YELLOWKNIFE — Another premier may be going to Ottawa with boxing gloves on.

Floyd Roland, 46, the newly chosen leader of the Northwest Territories, says it’s time the federal government took seriously the North’s desire to control and benefit from its own resources.

“I believe we do need to take a stronger approach as we see development happening in the Northwest Territories,” he said yesterday after being chosen. “And I really believe that northerners need to benefit from the development of the resources here in the North.”

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/story/LAC.20071018.PREMIER18/TPStory/National

by NationTalk on October 19, 2007849 Views

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Fears & Facts -Leader-Post

Fears & Facts

It’s illuminating to look behind the statistics that resulted in Regina’s unwanted title as the “Murder Capital of Canada”

The Leader-Post
Published: Friday, October 19, 2007

For the majority of Reginans, the scary numbers and sombre headlines just don’t add up.

The city is again “murder capital” of Canada?

It sure doesn’t feel like it in upscale neighbourhoods like Wascana View, Richmond Place or Albert Park.

http://www.canada.com/reginaleaderpost/news/viewpoints/story.html?id=54dbe656-dae2-4ae3-b5d7-296af9ad741a

by NationTalk on October 19, 20071171 Views

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Time to end rights exemption – Regina Leader-Post

Time to end rights exemption

Calgary Herald
Published: Friday, October 19, 2007

When the federal Tories announced in Tuesday’s throne speech that they intend to push forward with Bill C-44, which would bring First Nations communities under the Canadian Human Rights Act, the TV cameras registered a shocked expression on Phil Fontaine’s face.

Fontaine, national chief of the Assembly of First Nations, has consistently opposed the repealing of Section 67 of the Act, which for years has contained a First Nations exemption.

http://www.canada.com/reginaleaderpost/news/viewpoints/story.html?id=8091d3a3-875b-48b7-8ce0-457fbe27fed4

by NationTalk on October 19, 2007898 Views

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Aboriginals’ rights said violated – Regina Leader-Post

Aboriginals’ rights said violated

Kerry Benjoe, Leader-Post
Published: Friday, October 19, 2007

The Congress of Aboriginal Peoples (CAP) says the human rights of First Nations people are being violated.

“In a country as free and democratic as Canada, First Nations citizens are the only ones who don’t have full access to basic, fundamental human rights that other Canadians enjoy,” said Chief Patrick Brazeau on Thursday.

http://www.canada.com/reginaleaderpost/news/story.html?id=bef4080c-2e7d-447f-8230-1a6edf7fa8ab

by NationTalk on October 19, 20071050 Views

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Court decision favours Metis fishing year-round – Regina Leader-Post

Court decision favours Metis fishing year-round

Anne Kyle, Leader-Post
Published: Friday, October 19, 2007

The Metis Nation Saskatchewan is calling for the creation of a provincewide agreement that recognizes and respects Metis harvesting rights.

“It is time for the government of Saskatchewan to sit down and honourably negotiate an agreement with the MNS that recognizes and accommodates Metis harvesting rights throughout the province, rather than continuing to charge and prosecute Metis harvesters at great expense to our people and Saskatchewan taxpayers,” Metis Nation Saskatchewan president Robert Doucette told reporters on Thursday. “We call upon the leaders of both the NDP and the Saskatchewan Party to make such a commitment to the Metis people during this election campaign.”

http://www.canada.com/reginaleaderpost/news/story.html?id=b2558925-16a3-4923-84ed-4ed9993a727f

by NationTalk on October 19, 2007958 Views

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Feathers, sequins and the noble white man (The Globe and Mail)

Artist Kent Monkman explores the Old World’s view of aboriginal culture through painting and performance

SARAH MILROY
From Friday’s Globe and Mail
October 19, 2007 at 5:28 AM EDT

The studio of Toronto artist Kent Monkman is a study in cultural cross-pollination. On the table in the middle of the space, an assistant is making a ceremonial feather headdress to Monkman’s exacting specifications (black and white feathers with pink trim and sequins), regalia that will be used in his performance at the Royal Ontario Museum tonight. The desk nearby is scattered with correspondence and notes, and a selection of well-thumbed art history books are propped open here and there for easy reference, many of them marked with slips of paper.

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/story/RTGAM.20071019.wmonkman19/BNStory/Entertainment/?page=rss&id=RTGAM.20071019.wmonkman19

by NationTalk on October 19, 2007895 Views

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