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Oil Versus Water -The Dominion

October 15, 2007

Oil Versus Water
Toxic water poses threat to Alberta’s Indigenous communities

by Kim Petersen

Alberta is replete with precious oil. Recovery of that oil from the tar sands, however, is putting another precious resource at risk: water. Dene and Cree First Nations people live close to and in the midst of the largest tar sand deposit in the Athabasca River region and oil extraction is harming their water supply.

The recoverable oil reserves in Alberta’s tar sands are so bountiful that they vie with oil reserves in Saudi Arabia and Venezuela for top status. Compared to Saudi Arabia, however, the oil extraction process is very expensive. What is extracted is bitumen, a form of crude oil, mixed with clay and silica that must be refined to produce a barrel of oil. Current high oil prices make the extraction and refinement of bitumen very profitable.

http://www.dominionpaper.ca/articles/1429

by NationTalk on October 15, 2007928 Views

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Legend of Inuit Bogeyman and a Little Girl Fishing Works its Magic -The Gazette

Legend of Inuit bogeyman and a little girl fishing works its magic

KATHRYN GREENAWAY, The Gazette
Published: 10 hours ago

In the world of Geordie Productions, the play A Promise is a Promise has come full circle.

Artistic director Dean Patrick Fleming performed in the original cast 21 years ago. This time Fleming directs the play which opened the company’s mainstage season at D.B. Clarke Theatre over the weekend.

http://www.canada.com/montrealgazette/news/arts/story.html?id=ce324db5-f3ab-4467-bc44-a93326df01e3

by NationTalk on October 15, 20071259 Views

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Native community must embrace diversity within itself, youth told – Edmonton Journal

Native community must embrace diversity within itself, youth told
Advocate for tolerance demonstrates his point by wearing a dress

Hanneke Brooymans, The Edmonton Journal
Published: 2:21 am

EDMONTON – James Makokis stood in front of hundreds of aboriginal young people on Sunday wearing a dress.

It might have seemed an odd choice for the top spokesman of the National Aboriginal Role Model program. But the 25-year-old, who grew up on Saddle Lake Cree Nation, was using his sister’s traditional Cree dress to make a point.

http://www.canada.com/edmontonjournal/news/cityplus/story.html?id=1461772c-b34d-4dfe-9cad-112c9ae56671&k=32855

by NationTalk on October 15, 2007991 Views

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Reaching out just got easier; Residential school survivors get … – Owen Sound Sun Times

Reaching out just got easier; Residential school survivors get help telling their stories from volunteer and her donated wheels

Posted By BILL HENRY
Posted 53 mins ago | Updated 52 mins ago

Elsie Andrews has always kept to herself the worst memories of growing up in Indian residential schools.

Now 84, the Cape Croker resident is among survivors relying on neighbour Martie LaValley to help tell their stories as part of the Indian residential schools settlement agreement.

http://www.owensoundsuntimes.com/ArticleDisplay.aspx?e=733898&auth=BILL+HENRY

by NationTalk on October 15, 20071054 Views

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An identity complicated by politics – The Daily News

An identity complicated by politics

CANDY PALMATER
The Daily News

This is the third story in a five-part series by Candy Palmater. It explores the Mi’kmaq nation specifically and matters affecting aboriginal people in general and will appear in The Daily News every Monday of Mi’kmaq History Month this October. This week: identity.

One of the most fundamental human experiences is identity. The majority people spend most of their lives trying to figure out who, exactly, they are.

However, there is one segment of Canadian society for whom that exploration is superseded by a complicated government method of identification. You may be familiar with the words Indian and Aboriginal, but the government has an intricate system of numbers and names associated with words. It’s this one area, identity, that creates the majority of confusion and division among people.

http://www.hfxnews.ca/index.cfm?sid=71269&sc=89

by NationTalk on October 15, 2007923 Views

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Historic speech to seal Tsawwassen deal – Times Colonist

Historic speech to seal Tsawwassen deal
Chief to address legislature; fall session expected to focus on treaty process

Jeff Rud, Times Colonist
Published: Monday, October 15, 2007

Thirty-seven-year-old Kim Baird admits she’ll be nervous today as she makes a rare address to the B.C. legislature.

The chief of the Tsawwassen First Nation will have about 10 minutes this afternoon to speak to MLAs in the chamber, conveying what the first agreement reached under the B.C. treaty process will mean to her people.

http://www.canada.com/victoriatimescolonist/story.html?id=67d34359-82ab-491e-a279-427b5fa333b2&k=40310

by NationTalk on October 15, 2007889 Views

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First Nations have stake in election – Regina Leader-Post

First Nations have stake in election

Doug Cuthand, Special to The Leader-Post
Published: Monday, October 15, 2007

They’re at the post, the writ is dropped and they’re off on a month-long provincial election. Now the pundits are crawling out from the woodwork and under rocks and other wretched places. Is it the Sask. Party’s to lose like the last election or will the NDP pull off another squeaker?

In any event it’s about time. The parties have been campaigning and sniping at each other for over a year now. The Sask. Party was up in the polls but the NDP is a crafty old bunch and not without experience.

http://www.canada.com/reginaleaderpost/news/city_province/story.html?id=f71b041e-55e7-4f99-9e5a-c6198be8efe2

by NationTalk on October 15, 2007874 Views

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Aboriginal art’s presence -Globe and Mail

Aboriginal art’s presence

STEPHEN INGLIS
director general, Research and Collections, Canadian Museum of Civilization

October 13, 2007

Ottawa — Sarah Milroy’s review of the Shapeshifters exhibition at the Royal Ontario Museum in Toronto suggests there have been no large group exhibitions of contemporary aboriginal art in a Canadian museum since Reservation X at the Canadian Museum of Civilization in 1998. She states that “since then, things have been pretty quiet” (A New Look At Our Entangled Worlds – Review, Oct. 6).

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/story/LAC.20071013.COLETTS13-15/TPStory/?query=ABORIGINAL

by NationTalk on October 15, 2007886 Views

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How Campbell changed his view -Globe and Mail

How Campbell changed his view
Once adamantly opposed to treaties, the Premier has in the past few years come to champion native causes

JUSTINE HUNTER
October 13, 2007

VICTORIA — Three years ago, the National Chief of the Assembly of First Nations asked for a meeting with the new Premier of British Columbia, a man widely considered an adversary of the province’s native people.

Phil Fontaine, sitting in Gordon Campbell’s Vancouver cabinet office, swept aside the political rhetoric and issued a challenge: Let’s work together to make things better for aboriginal communities.

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/story/LAC.20071013.BCCAMPBELL13/TPStory/?query=ABORIGINAL

by NationTalk on October 15, 2007844 Views

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Fontaine calls on Ottawa to fulfill its responsibility to aboriginals -Globe and Mail

Fontaine calls on Ottawa to fulfill its responsibility to aboriginals

COLIN PERKEL
The Canadian Press
October 13, 2007

TORONTO — The Throne Speech will be watched closely next week to see how committed Prime Minister Stephen Harper is to ensuring the well-being of Canada’s aboriginal peoples, the country’s top native leader said yesterday.

In a speech to a conference of prospectors and developers, Phil Fontaine called on the federal government to fulfill its responsibility to natives.

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/story/LAC.20071013.NATIVES13/TPStory/?query=ABORIGINAL

by NationTalk on October 15, 2007985 Views

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Native communities denounce historic treaty -Globe and Mail

Native communities denounce historic treaty

JUSTINE HUNTER
October 15, 2007

VICTORIA — Tsawwassen Chief Kim Baird and Indian Affairs Minister Chuck Strahl will share breakfast this morning at a Victoria hotel to toast a landmark treaty for her community.

At the same time, just across the street, aboriginal leaders from throughout the province will be assembling to denounce the treaty process as a failure.

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/story/LAC.20071015.BCSESSION15/TPStory/?query=ABORIGINAL

by NationTalk on October 15, 2007884 Views

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Breakthrough in treaty-making marred by chiefs’ discontent with Campbell -Globe and Mail

Breakthrough in treaty-making marred by chiefs’ discontent with Campbell

JUSTINE HUNTER
From Saturday’s Globe and Mail
October 13, 2007 at 1:12 AM EDT

VICTORIA — Three years ago, the National Chief of the Assembly of First Nations asked for a meeting with the new Premier of British Columbia, a man widely considered an adversary of the province’s native people.

Phil Fontaine, sitting in Gordon Campbell’s Vancouver cabinet office, swept aside the political rhetoric and issued a challenge: Let’s work together to make things better for aboriginal communities.

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/story/RTGAM.20071013.bc-campbell-atl/BNStory/Technology/

by NationTalk on October 15, 2007897 Views

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Alta. First Nation inks $300M land claims deal -CTV

Alta. First Nation inks $300M land claims deal

Updated Sat. Oct. 13 2007 7:04 AM ET
The Canadian Press

WABASCA, Alta. — Alberta’s Bigstone Cree Nation and surrounding communities have signed an agreement-in-principle with the provincial and federal governments that would entitle them to the largest land claim settlement in Canadian history.

Overall, the settlement includes almost $300 million and almost 570 square kilometres of land.

http://www.ctv.ca/servlet/ArticleNews/story/CTVNews/20071013/land_claim_071013/20071013/

by NationTalk on October 15, 2007891 Views

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BC celebrates land-claims – Canoe.ca

B.C. celebrates land-claims

Mon, October 15, 2007
UPDATED: 2007-10-15 01:22:34 MST

VICTORIA — The often rancorous B.C. legislature opens today with a party as politicians celebrate what will become the ratification of the first urban aboriginal land-claims treaty in the province’s history.

The Liberal government will use the fall legislative session to ratify the treaty with the tiny, but economically powerful Tsawwassen First Nation of suburban Vancouver, whose chief and about 75 band members have been invited to sit inside the legislative chamber.

http://calsun.canoe.ca/News/National/2007/10/15/4577016-sun.html

by NationTalk on October 15, 2007899 Views

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Tsawwassen treaty on the table as legislature opens – Times Colonist

Tsawwassen treaty on the table as legislature opens

Jeff Rud, Times Colonist
Published: Sunday, October 14, 200

Thirty-seven-year-old Kim Baird admits she’ll be nervous today as she makes a rare address to the B.C. legislature.

The chief of the Tsawwassen First Nation will have about 10 minutes this afternoon to speak to MLAs in the chamber, conveying what the first agreement reached under the B.C. treaty process will mean to her people.

http://www.canada.com/victoriatimescolonist/news/story.html?id=d7ecfe18-e093-4cd5-8f3c-19798189f5df&k=59490

by NationTalk on October 15, 2007823 Views

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Historic BC treaty opens the often caustic BC legislature with a party – Prince George Citizen

Historic B.C. treaty opens the often caustic B.C. legislature with a party

(National News) Sunday, 14 October 2007, 11:30 PST

VICTORIA – The often rancorous B.C. legislature opens Monday with a party as politicians celebrate what will become the ratification of the first urban aboriginal land-claims treaty in the province’s history.

The Liberal government will use the fall legislative session to ratify the treaty with the tiny, but economically powerful Tsawwassen First Nation of suburban Vancouver, whose chief and about 75 band members have been invited to sit inside the legislative chamber with the government.

http://www.princegeorgecitizen.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=99626&Itemid=266

by NationTalk on October 14, 2007918 Views

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Blockade progress: Struthers – Winnipeg Sun

Blockade progress: Struthers

Talks to end Hollow Water First Nation blockades have “made progress,” according to provincial Conservation Minister Stan Struthers.

Struthers, fellow cabinet minister Eric Robinson and Hollow Water Chief Ian Bushie met Friday at a ceremonial sweat lodge in Hollow Water.

http://winnipegsun.com/News/Manitoba/2007/10/14/4574867-sun.html

by NationTalk on October 14, 2007897 Views

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Arts project aims to help at-risk youth -Edmonton Sun

Arts project aims to help at-risk youth

Best known for his role as a troubled teen on television, Edmonton-based actor Dakota House is using the arts to reach out to at-risk aboriginal youth.

House, who played Teevee Tania on North of 60 for six years, held a fundraiser for his non-profit organization, Going M.I.L.E.S., last night in downtown Edmonton.

The name stands for Motivating, Inspiring, Leading, Empowering and Succeeding.

http://www.edmontonsun.com/News/Edmonton/2007/10/14/4575088-sun.html

by NationTalk on October 14, 2007876 Views

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Soul for the whole globe (Toronto Star)

Soul for the whole globe
GreenTaRa’s identity and sound grew from richly varied roots

Oct 14, 2007 04:30 AM
Ashante Infantry
Pop & Jazz Critic

There are no short answers when it comes to the music and muses of West Coast singer/songwriter GreenTaRA.

Take the origins of her stage name, for instance.

“I was living in Australia in 2000,” begins 34-year-old Tara Donald on the phone from her Vancouver base. “I’d just started a weekly performance night at a hostel that I was living at, exchanging my performance for free accommodations.

http://www.thestar.com/entertainment/article/266602

by NationTalk on October 14, 2007835 Views

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Aboriginals invite UN inspectors to check on Quebec reserves (Montreal Gazette)

Aboriginals invite UN inspectors to check on Quebec reserves
To monitor how well Ottawa conforms to Declaration on Rights of Indigenous Peoples

JAN RAVENSBERGEN, The Gazette
Published: Saturday, October 13

An umbrella group representing 72,000 aboriginal people in Quebec will invite United Nations inspectors onto 43 reserves in the province to monitor how well the federal government conforms with the UN’s Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.

The Assembly of First Nations of Quebec and Labrador is seeking independent assessments of the federal government’s performance on education, housing and youth-protection issues, chief Ghislain Picard told reporters in Montreal yesterday.

http://www.canada.com/montrealgazette/news/story.html?id=5b1a1a17-5987-4090-9f79-fb9f87dbf6b8&k=98976

by NationTalk on October 14, 20071094 Views

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No sign of foul play, police say – Sudbury Star

No sign of foul play, police say

Posted 1 day ago

Foul play is not suspected in the death of a boater found in Mattagami Lake, police said.

Volunteers found the body of Andrew Luke, 71, floating face-down in the lake, north of Gogama, Monday evening.

He left on a boating excursion early Monday morning, likely to hunt or fish, said OPP Const. Marc Depatie, but did not return to his home in the Mattagami First Nation.

http://www.thesudburystar.com/ArticleDisplay.aspx?e=732440

by NationTalk on October 14, 2007981 Views

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Sandy Bay not giving up land claim fight -Central Plains Herald-Leader

Sandy Bay not giving up land claim fight
Band council will appeal commission’s rejection of its claim to a greater population

By John Cairns
Central Plains Herald-Leader
Saturday October 13, 2007

Sandy Bay Ojibway First Nation is preparing to appeal the ruling of the Indian Claims Commission panel that recommended the band’s treaty land entitlement claim not be accepted for negotiation.

Russell Beaulieu, a Sandy Bay band councillor, said the band council is disappointed by the panel’s decision, but not resigned to it.

http://www.cpheraldleader.com/Local%20News/345581.html

by NationTalk on October 14, 2007939 Views

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Human trafficking an issue in Canada -Edmonton Journal

Human trafficking an issue in Canada

Florence Loyie, edmontonjournal.com
Published: Friday, October 12

EDMONTON – Sherilyn Trompetter remembers the phone call which prompted her Edmonton organization to get involved with the issue of human trafficking.

It came in 2004 from a Sherwood Park woman’s shelter. They suspected one of their clients was a victim of human trafficking and wanted to help her.

http://www.canada.com/edmontonjournal/news/story.html?id=c1f9c216-3ba7-4e47-be78-2d5943638faf&k=96640

by NationTalk on October 14, 20071011 Views

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List of women on ‘Highway of Tears’ doubles -CTV

List of women on ‘Highway of Tears’ doubles

Updated Fri. Oct. 12 2007 10:18 PM ET
CTV.ca News Staff

The RCMP on Thursday doubled the list of women who have gone missing on a notorious British Columbia road known as the “Highway of Tears.”

Until now police believed nine young women died or went missing along Highway 16, a road which stretches from Prince Rupert to Prince George.

http://www.ctv.ca/servlet/ArticleNews/story/CTVNews/20071012/highway_oftears_071012/20071012?hub=TopStories

by NationTalk on October 14, 20071080 Views

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Nunavut’s internet appetite creates bandwidth concerns -CBC

Nunavut’s internet appetite creates bandwidth concerns

Last Updated: Friday, October 12, 2007 | 6:30 PM CT
CBC News

The growing demand for broadband internet service in Nunavut is causing some bandwidth bottlenecks for the territory’s high-speed provider.

Since launching its satellite-based broadband service in 2005, the Nunavut Broadband Development Corp.’s Qiniq service has had more subscribers than expected. At this time, about 3,700 Nunavut residents are Qiniq customers.

http://www.cbc.ca/canada/north/story/2007/10/12/nu-internet.html

by NationTalk on October 14, 2007821 Views

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Free-trade negotiator retires early from Senate -Globe and Mail

Free-trade negotiator retires early from Senate
The Canadian Press

October 12, 2007

OTTAWA — A former cabinet minister who helped negotiate the free-trade deal with the United States is retiring from the Senate.

A statement from the Prime Minister’s Office said Pat Carney, 72, has been a strong voice for aboriginal and women’s rights. Ms. Carney, a former journalist, has represented her home province of British Columbia in the Senate since 1990 after leaving the Conservative government of Brian Mulroney.

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/story/LAC.20071012.CARNEY12/TPStory/?query=ABORIGINAL

by NationTalk on October 14, 2007879 Views

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Teachers start hunger strike over ‘crisis’ in native schools

Teachers start hunger strike over ‘crisis’ in native schools

Oct 12, 2007 04:11 PM
Louise Brown
Education Reporter

Fed up with having to “beg like a dog” for Ottawa to give native schools the same funding as schools run by Queen’s Park, two native educators have started a hunger strike in Thunder Bay to push for better schooling for children on reserves.

“If politicians were forced to learn in the same conditions are our children – bare library shelves, no money for computers, no remedial help for children who are three years behind in reading – they’d be in trouble too,” said Matthew Angees, a former principal who now oversees language programs in five remote native communities north of Thunder Bay.

http://www.thestar.com/article/266331

by NationTalk on October 14, 2007974 Views

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NDP Can’t Take for Granted First Nations Votes -StarPhoenix

NDP can’t take for granted First Nations votes

Doug Cuthand, The StarPhoenix
Published: Friday, October 12, 2007

They’re at the post, the writ is dropped and they’re off on a month-long provincial election campaign.

The pundits are crawling out now from the woodwork, under rocks and other wretched places. Is the race the Saskatchewan Party’s to lose like the past election? Will the NDP pull off another squeaker?

http://www.canada.com/saskatoonstarphoenix/columnists/story.html?id=430db59f-4842-4800-8ec4-62beb5b5e500

by NationTalk on October 12, 2007935 Views

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Thomson Awarded Order of Merit -The Leader-Post

Thomson awarded Order of Merit

Kerry Benjoe, Leader-Post
Published: Friday, October 12, 2007

Cora Thomson of the Carry the Kettle First Nation has dedicated much of her life to improving her community and her years of hard work has earned her the province’s highest honour — the Order of Merit.

“I never expected anything like this to happen to me,” said Thomson.

http://www.canada.com/reginaleaderpost/news/city_province/story.html?id=787af7f0-3453-4083-bbc3-0c5343168860

by NationTalk on October 12, 2007938 Views

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RCMP Mishandled Standoff, Innu Say -CBC

RCMP mishandled standoff, Innu say

Last Updated: Friday, October 12, 2007 | 8:27 AM NT
CBC News

People in the Innu community of Natuashish in northern Labrador are accusing the RCMP of mishandling an armed standoff that occurred when a man barricaded himself in a house.

The 16-hour standoff ended peacefully at about 1 a.m. Thursday when RCMP officers entered the house and found the man, 31, had escaped through a back door police say they didn’t know was there.

http://www.cbc.ca/canada/newfoundland-labrador/story/2007/10/12/innu-standoff.html

by NationTalk on October 12, 2007783 Views

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Watt-Cloutier Applauds Gore’s Nobel Win -The Globe and Mail

Watt-Cloutier applauds Gore’s Nobel win

The Canadian Press
October 12, 2007 at 9:32 AM EDT

IQALUIT — Sheila Watt-Cloutier says the planet Earth is a winner in the decision to award the Nobel Peace Prize to Al Gore and the UN’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

She tells CBC Newsworld that it means the issue of the global environment has won.

Ms. Watt-Cloutier says she’s more surprised at being nominated than disappointed by not winning.

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/story/RTGAM.20071012.wwattcloutier1012/BNStory/Front

by NationTalk on October 12, 2007887 Views

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Island West Coast -The Times Colonist

Island west coast
First Nations set for treaty vote

Judith Lavoie, Times Colonist
Published: Friday, October 12, 2007

As First Nations on the west coast of Vancouver Island head into a week of voting on a landmark multimillion-dollar treaty, negotiators and chiefs are optimistic the agreement will get enthusiastic approval.

“Looking at how people are reacting to the information, I am positive that we are going to have a treaty ratified by all five nations,” said Chief Charlie Coots of the Uchucklesaht Tribe.

http://www.canada.com/victoriatimescolonist/news/capital_van_isl/story.html?id=474071ed-45ae-4313-a660-d7b023423754&k=12741

by NationTalk on October 12, 2007829 Views

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Good Politics Trumping Hypocrisy in Treaty Fete -The Province

Good politics trumping hypocrisy in treaty fete
Campbell’s turn to get all misty-eyed over native ratification

Michael Smyth, The Province
Published: Friday, October 12, 2007

The last time British Columbia ratified a land-claims treaty with a B.C. native band, Gordon Campbell made a point of snubbing all the pomp and ceremony.

The occasion was the official signing of the Nisga’a treaty in 1998. I remember covering the emotional ceremony in New Aiyansh, where the walls reverberated from all the joyous dancing, drumming and singing of the Nisga’a people.

http://www.canada.com/theprovince/news/story.html?id=b7b29c9d-23b5-450a-9655-479d93655d37

by NationTalk on October 12, 2007902 Views

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Canadian Contender Wanted Nobel for Inuit but Glad Earth Won -The Gazette

Canadian contender wanted Nobel for Inuit but glad Earth won

AFP
Published: 6 hours ago

Canadian environmentalist Sheila Watt-Cloutier, considered a Nobel Peace Prize contender, said Friday she was disappointed she did not get a share of the honor but that Earth was a winner in the end.

Watt-Cloutier said she had been jointly nominated for the award with former US vice president Al Gore, who won the Nobel alongside the United Nations’ Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC).

http://www.canada.com/montrealgazette/story.html?id=db63d5a0-189a-4b4d-88b1-7de416773034

by NationTalk on October 12, 2007877 Views

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UN to be asked to inspect reserves – Montreal Gazette

UN to be asked to inspect reserves

The Gazette
Published: 3 hours ago

A large Quebec umbrella group for aboriginal peoples said it will ask the United Nations to send inspectors onto Quebec reserves to examine how the federal government conforms to the UN’s Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, adopted by the UN General Assembly on Sept. 12.

http://www.canada.com/montrealgazette/news/story.html?id=4e093082-0141-428c-af48-f5554f3354e0&k=46536

by NationTalk on October 12, 2007881 Views

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Caribou found dead in Nunavik-area river -CBC

Caribou found dead in Nunavik-area river

Last Updated: Thursday, October 11, 2007 | 7:58 PM ET
CBC News

More than 300 dead caribou were spotted Wednesday floating down the Kuujjuaq River in northern Quebec’s Nunavik region.

Quebec wildlife officer Valley Saunders told CBC News that the caribou were drowning at the Limestone Falls, about 150 kilometres south of Kuujjuaq. The area is home to the George River Caribou Herd, which is in the middle of its fall migration.

http://www.cbc.ca/canada/montreal/story/2007/10/11/nvk-caribou.html

by NationTalk on October 12, 20071094 Views

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Province to meet with band blocking cottage roads -CBC

Province to meet with band blocking cottage roads
‘Simply a ceremony,’ not a negotiation: minister

Last Updated: Thursday, October 11, 2007 | 10:33 AM CT
CBC News

There’s been a break in the standoff between the provincial government and the Hollow Water First Nation, which has been blocking roads for almost a month near cottage developments on the east side of Lake Winnipeg.

Conservation Minister Stan Struthers received word late Wednesday that the band was willing to talk, after declining more than a dozen earlier requests to meet.

http://www.cbc.ca/canada/manitoba/story/2007/10/11/hollow-water.html?ref=rss

by NationTalk on October 12, 2007959 Views

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Energy site given blessing -Powell River Peak

Energy site given blessing

Laura Walz — Peak Editor
10/11/2007

Plutonic Power Corporation president Donald McInnes invited Premier Gordon Campbell and chiefs of three first nations to a ceremonial bridge crossing and blessing of the $660-million East Toba River-Montrose Creek run-of-river project.

Campbell said the project was an example of how innovative companies, working with first nation partners, can promote sustainable economic development and provide clean electricity. Plutonic’s project fits in with the government’s energy policy to be self-sufficient by 2016 and to produce 90 per cent of its electricity from clean sources, Campbell also said, and is an example that others will follow. “This is a new map for a future that all of us will be able to share and benefit from,” he said. “These are the kinds of projects that we have to pursue if we are to be successful in reducing our greenhouse gas emissions by 33 per cent by 2020.”

http://www.zwire.com/site/news.cfm?newsid=18907718&BRD=1998&PAG=461&dept_id=221589&rfi=6

by NationTalk on October 12, 2007998 Views

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Aboriginal people left behind in education -Toronto Star

Aboriginal people left behind in education

Oct 11, 2007 04:30 AM
——————————————————————————–
Move education beyond

the faith-based debate

Ideas, Oct. 9
——————————————————————————–
Annie Kidder misses the mark. The focus on literacy and numeracy responds to what parents have said they value. We have seen improvement over the past five years in these areas. The work of Alan King of Queen’s University, from 2003 to 2005, identified many of the problems faced by high-school students. As a result, there has been a provincial strategy to focus on student success initiatives. For the first time in decades, there is an emphasis on supporting students to follow pathways that focus on skills development and lead to destinations other than university.

http://www.thestar.com/article/265537

by NationTalk on October 12, 20071001 Views

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Employers urged to think ahead -Regina Leader-Post

Employers urged to think ahead

Karen Brownlee, The Leader-Post
Published: Thursday, October 11, 2007

The labour shortage that Saskatchewan is experiencing is not a passing trend and those involved in an upcoming conference focused on finding and keeping employees are hoping to help employers deal with this new reality.

A two-day event is being held in Swift Current called “Think Future” on Oct. 18 and 19. It is being promoted as the first conference held in our province that focuses on labour attraction and retention.

http://www.canada.com/reginaleaderpost/news/business_agriculture/story.html?id=f3bce7b6-3251-4e82-bf07-f072b135620d

by NationTalk on October 12, 2007846 Views

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Inuvik Teens, Adults Debate Proposed Curfew -CBC

Inuvik teens, adults debate proposed curfew

Last Updated: Thursday, October 11, 2007 | 10:03 AM CT
CBC News

A proposed curfew aimed at keeping youth off the streets in Inuvik, N.W.T., late at night received glowing approvals from grown-ups at a public hearing Wednesday, but opposition from some teenagers who said it unfairly punishes law-abiding youth.

Residents the town of nearly 3,500 debated the proposed bylaw, which council drafted in an effort to combat vandalism and petty crime, as well as send a message to parents that their children should not be roaming Inuvik’s streets unattended at night.

http://www.cbc.ca/canada/north/story/2007/10/11/nwt-curfew.html

by NationTalk on October 11, 20071015 Views

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Canadian hero, or 19th-century ‘sociopath’? – Globe and Mail

Canadian hero, or 19th-century ‘sociopath’?

VAL ROSS
October 11, 2007

Last night, three canoes washed up at Toronto’s tony York Club. The largest was an 11-metre replica, built four years ago by the Canadian Canoe Museum in Peterborough, Ont., of the massive birchbark craft that once carried the Hudson’s Bay Company’s most powerful governor, Sir George Simpson, across his vast domains.

The second canoe was a 38-centimetre sterling-silver model, dating from about 1841, of the same vessel. The third was an action-packed image gracing the cover of Emperor of the North: Sir George Simpson and the Remarkable Story of the Hudson’s Bay Company, a new biography by the curator of the Canadian Canoe Museum, James Raffan.

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/story/LAC.20071011.CANOE11/TPStory/Entertainment

by NationTalk on October 11, 20071009 Views

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Igloolik elder praised for preserving Inuit justice, law (CBC North)

Igloolik elder praised for preserving Inuit justice, law

Last Updated: Thursday, October 11, 2007 | 9:16 AM CT
CBC News

Former students and associates of Igloolik, Nunavut, elder Lucien Ukaliannuk, who passed away more than a week ago, praised him for working tirelessly to preserve Inuit traditional law and justice.

Ukaliannuk, 67, died peacefully on Sept. 29 in Iqaluit.

http://www.cbc.ca/canada/north/story/2007/10/11/nu-lucien.html?ref=rss

by NationTalk on October 11, 2007862 Views

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Critics’ Choice -Toronto Star

Critics’ Choice

Oct 11, 2007 04:30 AM

TOMORROW

Kenojuak Ashevak is at the McMichael Canadian Art Collection in Kleinburg for the gallery’s three-day festival of Inuit art. One of the country’s most internationally recognized artists, Kenojuak will be working on her prints during gallery hours tomorrow to Sunday while greeting guests. She’ll be celebrating her 80th birthday Sunday, complete with an arctic throat-singing group to perform in her honour at 12:30 p.m., with a birthday cake to follow at 1:15 p.m. Sculptor David Ruben Piqtoukun, artist-in-residence for the festival, is showing some of his work as well as taking part in the Saturday-morning children’s workshop.

http://www.thestar.com/entertainment/article/265133

by NationTalk on October 11, 2007944 Views

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Creativity abounds in ImagineNative festival (Toronto Star)

Creativity abounds in ImagineNative festival

Oct 11, 2007 04:30 AM

Four Sheets to the Wind is a coming of age tale in which a young man, mourning the death of his father, is compelled to explore the world outside the reservation.

The feature, from director Sterlin Harjo, opens next week’s ImagineNative Film and Media Arts Festival, and is an apt metaphor for the festival’s goal of showcasing the wide world of art by and about the indigenous experience. Some highlights:

http://www.thestar.com/entertainment/WhatsOn/article/265214

by NationTalk on October 11, 20072404 Views

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Protesters seek on-reserve school funds – The Chronicle Journal

Protesters seek on-reserve school funds

By LINDSAY LAFRAUGH
Wednesday, October 10, 2007

Matthew Angees and Douglas Beardy are hungry for more funding for on-reserve education.

The pair set up camp Wednesday outside the regional office of Indian and Northern Affairs Canada on Anemki Drive where they began fasting in protest of the lack of funding to band-operated schools.

http://www.chroniclejournal.com/stories_local.php?id=69346

by NationTalk on October 11, 2007788 Views

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Hampton pledges to fight for another four years – St. Catharines Standard

Hampton pledges to fight for another four years
NDP jumps four per cent in popular vote

Posted By Mike Aiken, Sun Media
Posted 12 hours ago | Updated 12 hours ago

NDP Leader Howard Hampton pledged four more years of leadership last night, despite the election of another Liberal majority.

Speaking as results were still coming in from close ridings, where he said he might win another four seats, Hampton promised to fight on.

http://www.stcatharinesstandard.ca/ArticleDisplay.aspx?e=728590&auth=Mike+Aiken%2C+Sun+Media

by NationTalk on October 11, 2007793 Views

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Gala to Recognize Aboriginal Leaders -Winnipeg Free Press

Gala to recognize aboriginal leaders
Business owners nominated for prestigious award

Thu Oct 11 2007
By Larry Kusch

PAT TURNER has been a federal civil servant and a grand chief, but her main legacy will likely be the success she’s achieved in the business community.

A victim of federal downsizing after an 18-year career in government, Turner took over a company with one truck and one loader in 1990 and turned it into a multi-faceted firm that employs up to 30 in the northern community of Grand Rapids

http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/subscriber/business/local/story/4055583p-4660600c.html

by NationTalk on October 11, 20071001 Views

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Playing politics with pipe -Oilweek Magazine

Oct 2007
Source: Oilweek Magazine

Playing politics with pipe

TransCanada’s Keystone project wins NEB approval, but disdain from unions for exporting refining jobs to the United States

Dale Lunan

Back in the day, opposition to big-inch pipeline projects would come from a host of stakeholders with a direct connection to any new pipeline: First Nations protecting sacred grounds and traditional hunting territories; environmentalists concerned about the impact of pipeline construction on fragile ecosystems; farmers and ranchers worried about the loss, temporary or otherwise, of productive land.

http://www.oilweek.com/articles.asp?ID=478

by NationTalk on October 11, 2007956 Views

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Kemess North not dead -Interior News

Kemess North not dead

By Thom Barker
Oct 10 2007

A partisan mining crowd broke into spontaneous applause as Harold Bent, Northgate Minerals’ environmental manager, outlined his concern that a recent panel decision could have far-reaching implications for the B.C. industry.

Bent told Kevin Krueger, B.C. minister of state for mining, and the 80 industry delegates gathered at the Smithers Golf and Country Club on Thursday, that the panel’s recommendation not to approve his company’s Kemess North project has weakened confidence in B.C. mining.

http://www.interior-news.com/portals-code/list.cgi?paper=31&cat=23&id=1080754&more=0

by NationTalk on October 11, 2007942 Views

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