S Mainstream Aboriginal Related News

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Exhibit features urban Coast Salish works – Victoria Times Colonist

Exhibit features urban Coast Salish works

Friendship Centre displays selection of pieces from its collection

By Amy Smart, Times Colonist March 22, 2012

EXHIBIT

Celebrating 40 Years of Urban Aboriginal Art

Where: Victoria Native Friendship Centre, 231 Regina Ave.

When: Thursday and Friday, 6 to 8 p.m.

The Victoria Native Friendship Centre opens its doors today and Friday to present a selection of pieces from its collection of nearly 300 artworks.

The collection serves a dual purpose for the community, said co-curator Peter Morin, who is also Tahltan curator-in-residence at Open Space.

Read more: http://www.timescolonist.com/Exhibit+features+urban+Coast+Salish+works/6341448/story.html#ixzz1prHt0PT9

by NationTalk on March 22, 2012343 Views

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Terrace Bay man says racism drove him from the oil patch – CBC.ca

Terrace Bay man says racism drove him from the oil patch

Human rights advocate says Aboriginal awareness lacking in the boardroom and the job site

Jody Porter CBC News Posted: Mar 22, 2012

A man from Terrace Bay has filed a complaint with the Alberta Human Rights Commission after he says his supervisor made racist comments.

Daniel Chaboyer is a big man, accustomed to standing up for himself. Sometimes in his younger days, he did so with his fists.

But when Chaboyer met an even more physically imposing supervisor, a man who he said liked to refer to him as “my Indian,” Chaboyer took a different route.

Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/thunder-bay/story/2012/03/22/tby-human-rights-complaint.html

by NationTalk on March 22, 2012898 Views

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Court upholds native fishers’ tax exemption – Winnipeg Free Press

Court upholds native fishers’ tax exemption

By: Alexandra Paul
Posted: 03/22/2012

A pair of fishers from Norway House has taken on the federal taxman and won a court ruling that could open the door to tax-free commercial fishing off-reserve.

“It’s wonderful news,” Norway House Cree Nation Chief Ron Evans said Wednesday. “I think it’s obvious the fishermen are always busy exercising their treaty rights.”

In a decision by Justice John Evans of the Federal Court of Appeal, the court rejected arguments by the Canada Revenue Agency that the income earned by two fishers — Ronald Robertson and Roger Saunders — should be taxed, despite an Indian Act tax exemption they argued they were eligible to use.

Read more: http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/local/court-upholds-native-fishers-tax-exemption-143775196.html

by NationTalk on March 22, 2012601 Views

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‘I saw I couldn’t do my job,’ says lawyer who quit missing women inquiry – Victoria Times Colonist

‘I saw I couldn’t do my job,’ says lawyer who quit missing women inquiry

By JUDITH LAVOIE, timescolonist.com March 22, 2012

Quitting was better than giving credibility to a flawed process by continuing to struggle to represent aboriginal interests at the Missing Women Commission of Inquiry, lawyer Robyn Gervais said Wednesday.

Gervais withdrew on

March 6, saying there was a disproportionate focus on police evidence and aboriginal interests were not being met.

“Initially, I thought it was better to have some aboriginal voices at the table,” said Gervais, who took part in a panel discussion at the University of Victoria Wednesday.

Read more: http://www.timescolonist.com/news/couldn+says+lawyer+quit+missing+women+inquiry/6339857/story.html#ixzz1prGXacuU

by NationTalk on March 22, 2012435 Views

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‘Dysfunctional’ aboriginals need jobs: Tory – Vancouver Sun

‘Dysfunctional’ aboriginals need jobs: Tory

Ottawa minister stirs first nations anger with comment on speeding up resources development

By Fiona Anderson, Vancouver Sun March 22, 2012

Many aboriginal communities are “socially dysfunctional,” and could benefit from developments that bring jobs and revenue to them, Canada’s Minister of Natural Resources Joe Oliver said at a Vancouver Board of Trade breakfast Wednesday.

Oliver was talking about the need to amend Canada’s regulatory process to ensure mining and other resource-development projects could proceed in a timely fashion.

But amendments to the cur-rent environmental assessment process – which Oliver said would be introduced within the next few months – would still ensure the projects were “safe for Canadians and safe for the environment,” he said.

Read more: http://www.vancouversun.com/business/Dysfunctional+aboriginals+need+jobs+Tory/6341582/story.html#ixzz1prFv1YsF

by NationTalk on March 22, 2012539 Views

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New generation of leaders in city for big conferences – Canada.com

New generation of leaders in city for big conferences

Youngsters look to find progressive solutions for issues face on nation’s reserves

BY TAMARA CUNNINGHAM, DAILY NEWS MARCH 22, 2012

As the fastest-growing population group in Canada, aboriginal youth will wield significant power to help their communities, young leaders say.

Aboriginal youth from across Canada have converged on Nanaimo this week for the Snuneymuxw First Nation’s Vision Your Future conference at Beban Park and Gathering Our Voices, an annual event put on by the B.C. Association of Aboriginal Friendship Centres. The events are a chance for youth to build skills through workshops and become inspired by achievements of their peers.

But it is also an opportunity for young people to consider their future as one of the largest population groups in Canada.

Read more: http://www.canada.com/generation+leaders+city+conferences/6341157/story.html

by NationTalk on March 22, 2012356 Views

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Aboriginal music finds home at Junos – Edmonton Journal

Aboriginal music finds home at Junos

BY PATRICK LANGSTON, POSTMEDIA NEWS MARCH 22, 2012

There’s a nominee who’s a straight-up country musician. There’s a bluesman. And a duo that blends traditional powwow music with decidedly non-First-Nations house music.

So what exactly makes an act eligible for the Junos’ Aboriginal Recording of the Year category? And considering the history of native peoples in Canada, is having such a category perpetuating apartness?

“It’s not a racial category, it’s a musical category,” says Brian Wright-McLeod, a Dakota-Anishnabe and chair of the Junos’ aboriginal category. Eligible styles include all traditional forms, hand drums and traditional flutes, Inuit throat singing, and Metis and other fiddling. Also eligible are fusions of all genres of contemporary music that incorporate the eligible styles and/or reflect the aboriginal experience in Canada through words or music. And 50 per cent of an album’s listening time has to meet the above criteria. The judges are First Nations people involved in music, arts and culture.

Read more: http://www.edmontonjournal.com/entertainment/Aboriginal+music+finds+home+Junos/6340904/story.html

by NationTalk on March 22, 2012441 Views

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Help sought after welcomes wore out – Winnipeg Free Press

Help sought after welcomes wore out

Explanation for ballooning evacuee list:

By: Larry Kusch
Posted: 03/21/2012

The number of Lake St. Martin First Nation evacuees has soared in recent months as flooded-out residents wore out their welcome with friends and relatives and turned to the authorities for help.

That was the explanation offered Tuesday by the president of the Manitoba Association of Native Fire Fighters, which is responsible for processing assistance claims on behalf of Ottawa.

Gerald Houle said when rising lake levels last year overwhelmed the Manitoba First Nation, many residents moved in with friends and relatives in neighbouring communities and did not immediately claim compensation. But after a time, they wore out their welcome.

Read more: http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/local/help-sought-after-welcomes-wore-out-143609616.html

by NationTalk on March 21, 2012654 Views

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Mayor apologizes for past racist remarks – CBC.ca

Mayor apologizes for past racist remarks

During race-relations event Keith Hobbs says racism will not be tolerated in Thunder Bay

CBC News Posted: Mar 21, 2012

About 200 people came out for a discussion on Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal race relations in Thunder Bay Tuesday night.

Mayor Keith Hobbs, Fort William First Nation Chief Peter Collins, Wendy Landry President of the Thunder Bay Council of the Metis Nation of Ontario and Lakehead University president Brian Stevenson were among the speakers at the event, which was hosted by the university.

Many of the people in the audience were moved when Hobbs said he wanted to publicly apologize for making racist remarks in the past.

Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/thunder-bay/story/2012/03/21/tby-race-relations-event.html

by NationTalk on March 21, 2012516 Views

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Bridging the Gap – The Chronicle-Journal

Bridging the gap

Special to The Chronicle-Journal
Wednesday, March 21, 2012
By Doug Diaczuk

The way to create better relations between aboriginal and non-aboriginal people in Thunder Bay is by providing more opportunities through education.

A panel of political leaders and aboriginal strategists agree that not only will education provide aboriginal youth with more experience and training, it will help maintain cultural understanding and connections to traditional teachings.

On Tuesday, the Ken Morrison Lecture series presented Aboriginal and Non-Aboriginal Relations in Thunder Bay: Our Shared Future.

Read more: http://www.chroniclejournal.com/content/news/local/2012/03/21/bridging-gap

by NationTalk on March 21, 2012644 Views

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First Nation Artifact Now Returned to B.C. – Postmedia News

First Nation artifact now returned to B.C.

Nuu-chah-nulth club was given to Capt. James Cook in 1778

BY SUZANNE FOURNIER, POSTMEDIA NEWS MARCH 21, 2012

A ceremonial yew-wood club has come home to British Columbia, more than two centuries after it was carved by a Mowachaht-Muchalaht First Nation artisan and then given to Capt. James Cook in 1778.

Philanthropist Michael Audain, 74, said he “can now relax,” knowing the $1.2-million artifact of “global historical and cultural significance,” is no longer in his locked office drawer but at the University of B.C.’s Museum of Anthropology.

At a Tuesday morning ceremony attended by MowachachtMuchalaht elder Margarita James, the club was accepted by the MOA, where it will be displayed.

Read more: http://www.canada.com/First+Nation+artifact+returned/6334787/story.html

by NationTalk on March 21, 2012407 Views

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Category Supposed to be About the Music – Ottawa Citizen

Category supposed to be about the music

But does award for aboriginal album promote or pigeonhole First Nations culture?

By Patrick Langston, Ottawa Citizen March 21, 2012

There’s a nominee who’s a straight-up country musician. There’s a bluesman. And a duo that blends traditional powwow music with decidedly non-First- Nations house music.

So what exactly makes an act eligible for the Junos’ Aboriginal Recording of the Year category? And considering the history of native peoples in Canada, is having such a category perpetuating apartness?

“It’s not a racial category, it’s a musical category,” says Brian Wright-McLeod, a Dakota-Anishnabe and chair of the Junos’ aboriginal category. Eligible styles include all traditional forms, hand drums and traditional flutes, Inuit throat singing, and Métis and other fiddling. Also eligible are fusions of all genres of contemporary music that incorporate the eligible styles and/or reflect the aboriginal experience in Canada through words or music. And 50 per cent of an album’s listening time has to meet the above criteria. The judges are First Nations people involved in music, arts and culture.

Read more: http://www.ottawacitizen.com/entertainment/Category+supposed+about+music/6333559/story.html#ixzz1plcFUBLi

by NationTalk on March 21, 2012392 Views

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Engagement Crucial for Forum – Leader-Post

Engagement crucial for forum

BY KERRY BENJOE, LEADER-POST MARCH 21, 2012

The National Centre for First Nations Governance hopes Regina will be filled with people willing to share their ideas about First Nations governance.

Jocelyne Wasacase-Merasty, NCFNG prairies regional manager, said her organization is hosting a one-day forum in Regina on Tuesday.

“I’m trying to make it very open to First Nations people,” she said.

“When we talk about governance I think there is a movement that needs to be started.

Read more: http://www.leaderpost.com/life/Engagement+crucial+forum/6333848/story.html#ixzz1plbjtXR7

by NationTalk on March 21, 2012442 Views

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Massive Conference Brings Youth Together – Daily News

Massive conference brings youth together

BY TAMARA CUNNINGHAM, DAILY NEWS MARCH 21, 2012

Fifteen-year-old Valeen Jules fiddled with the pink headphones around her neck and smiled as she waited to register for the 10th annual Gathering Our Voices conference in Nanaimo.

“This is exciting for sure,” she said.

“I went to the one in Prince Rupert last year and everything about it was fun.”

Jules, a Nanaimo teen, is among 1,400 aboriginal youth who have converged on the Harbour City this week for the annual conference, packing restaurants, hotels and the longcriticized Vancouver Island Conference Centre.

Read more: http://www.canada.com/Massive+conference+brings+youth+together/6334770/story.html

by NationTalk on March 21, 2012508 Views

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Thriving Resource Sector Means First Nations Jobs, Minister Says – Calgary Herald

Thriving resource sector means First Nations jobs, minister says

By Mario Toneguzzi, Calgary Herald March 21, 2012

Canada’s aboriginal communities should be an integral part of future job creation, Calgary business leaders heard Tuesday.

John Duncan, federal Minister of Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development, told a chamber of commerce audience that a tightening labour market and growing natural resources sectors will bring opportunity for skilled native workers.

The First Nations population is expected to reach 1.5 million by 2026, Duncan said, with 40 per cent under the age of 25. Over the next five years, an estimated 155,000 native youths will reach working age, he said.

Read more: http://www.calgaryherald.com/business/Thriving+resource+sector+means+First+Nations+jobs+minister+says/6334494/story.html#ixzz1plbDOXfK

by NationTalk on March 21, 2012432 Views

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Ex-CEO Sues First Nation Over Dismissal – The Chronicle Herald

Ex-CEO sues First Nation over dismissal

March 21, 2012

Shubenacadie band now faces legal action from 2 former workers

The former chief executive officer for the Shubenacadie First Nation is suing the band.

In papers filed this month in Nova Scotia Supreme Court, Rick Simon alleges wrongful dismissal and says he is owed money.

Simon’s claim says he was hired and entered into what was to be a five-year contract with the band last May, effective April 1, 2011. The contract, said Simon, was to include access to the band council’s financial, client and personnel information as well as information related to Chief Jerry Sack and his personal business interests. He was also entitled to a $10,000 signing bonus, expenses related to his duties and a full range of benefits, including the pension plan.

Read more: http://thechronicleherald.ca/novascotia/75856-ex-ceo-sues-first-nation-over-dismissal

by NationTalk on March 21, 2012619 Views

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Evacuee list has long raised flags – Winnipeg Free Press

Evacuee list has long raised flags

Rising numbers known in 2011

By: Mia Rabson
Posted: 03/20/2012

OTTAWA — The federal government began questioning in December the ballooning list of evacuees from flooded First Nations and even warned chiefs bands could be on the hook for payments to ineligible claimants.

But more than three months later, Ottawa still has no answers for the multimillion-dollar questions swirling around evacuation lists that continue to grow long after the residents fled affected communities.

In a letter dated Dec. 6, 2011 and obtained by the Free Press, the regional emergency management co-ordinator for Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada wrote to several chiefs of evacuated reserves questioning why some evacuation lists continued to grow months after the floods.

Read more: http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/local/evacuee-list-has-long-raised-flags-143444856.html

by NationTalk on March 20, 2012583 Views

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Native diabetes expert warns of disease-related risks – NorthernLife.ca

Native diabetes expert warns of disease-related risks

Mar 19, 2012
By: Sudbury Northern Life Staff

Diabetes is a disease many Aboriginal families battle.

Diabetes was rare among the Aboriginal population prior to 1940, according to Statistics Canada. Today, though, the situation has reached epidemic levels. Close to nine per cent of Aboriginal individuals living in urban centres have diabetes, compared to six per cent of non-Aboriginal people.

There is also have a greater chance of getting Type 2 diabetes, which is much more prevalent in Aboriginal children then non-Aboriginal children.

Read more: http://www.northernlife.ca/news/localNews/2012/03/19-native-diabetes-risks-sudbury.aspx

by NationTalk on March 20, 2012370 Views

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Aboriginal Music Showcase – CBC.ca

Aboriginal Music Showcase

Manitoba Music’s Aboriginal Music Program will be taking over the Pyramid Cabaret on March 24 for a showcase of emerging Aboriginal artists.

The event — which features sets by country singer/songwriter Jerry Sereda and Desiree Dorion, new country duo D’Aoust Brothers, singer/songwriters and rapper Lorenzo, and teenage pop singer Savannah Rae Boyko —

Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/manitoba/community/mt/2012/03/aboriginal-music-showcase.html

by NationTalk on March 20, 2012548 Views

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Though Need is Urgent, Reforming Native Education Won’t Happen Overnight – The Globe and Mail

Though need is urgent, reforming native education won’t happen overnight

JOHN IBBITSON | Columnist profile | E-mail
Globe and Mail Update
Published Tuesday, Mar. 20, 2012

When Scott Haldane presented his panel’s report on reforming first nations education to Aboriginal Affairs Minister John Duncan and his officials last January, “they gulped,” Mr. Haldane remembers.

“They liked the ideas in it, but they thought the timeline was ambitious,” said Mr. Haldane, who is president of the Canadian YMCA. Not only did the report call for a new First Nations Education Act that would lead to the creation of a proper native education system, but it wanted the government to move this year, with the necessary funding incorporated in the 2012 budget.

“The need is that urgent,” he believes.

Mr. Haldane and, far more important, children living on Indian reserves will get at least some of what the panel proposed.

Read more: http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/politics/john-ibbitson/though-need-is-urgent-reforming-native-education-wont-happen-overnight/article2374823/?from=sec368

by NationTalk on March 20, 2012366 Views

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Chinook Fishery Woes are Being Spread Around: DFO – Times Colonist

Chinook fishery woes are being spread around: DFO

BY JUDITH LAVOIE, TIMES COLONIST MARCH 20, 2012

All sectors of the fishing industry are being asked to share the pain in an effort to save some chinook salmon runs on the Fraser River, says Fisheries and Oceans Canada.

“We are expecting to see poor returns of the five-year-old spring and summer chinook, so we have been talking to all the people who have been harvesting them and looking for ways to reduce the impacts this coming season and possibly for the future,” Les Jantz, DFO area chief of resource management for the B.C. Interior, said Monday.

“We are looking for whatever options are available. We’re not trying to close fisheries per se,” he said.

Read more: http://www.timescolonist.com/Chinook+fishery+woes+being+spread+around/6328940/story.html#ixzz1pgCqu4S4

by NationTalk on March 20, 2012450 Views

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Senate Committee Approves First Nations Election Bill – Winnipeg Free Press

Senate Committee Approves First Nations Election Bill

By: Mia Rabson
Posted: 03/20/2012

OTTAWA — A Senate committee gave the nod to a bill setting out new rules for elections on First Nations but not without some serious concerns.

The Senate standing committee on aboriginal peoples sent Bill S-6 back to the Senate for third reading last week, but indicated a wish to see the government withdraw some powers the bill gives the minister and introduce a better appeals process for First Nations elections.

Bill S-6 was introduced last fall after several years of negotiations led in part by the Assembly of Manitoba Chiefs. The bill establishes a new system for First Nations elections that includes common election days within regions, four-year terms and more accountability, including penalties for offences such as obstructing the election process or engaging in electoral fraud. Appeals of election results would be heard by the courts rather than the minister of aboriginal affairs.

Read more: http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/local/senate-committee-approves-first-nations-election-bill-143444866.html

by NationTalk on March 20, 2012304 Views

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Treaty Education Pact Inked at U of S – The StarPhoenix

Treaty education pact inked at U of S

By Betty Ann Adam, The StarPhoenix March 20, 2012

The effect of treaties on everyone in the province will become increasingly familiar and better understood at the University of Saskatchewan, thanks to a new partnership between the Aboriginal Students’ Centre and the Office of the Treaty Commissioner.

“We are all treaty people, but one side of the treaty has not really benefitted as the newcomers have benefitted,” OTC commissioner Bill McKnight said.

“I own my land because of treaty. I own my home because of treaty. We opened up this part of Canada because of treaty and we have to now recognize that relationship has to be ongoing and has to benefit all of us that are involved,” McKnight said.

Read more: http://www.thestarphoenix.com/news/Treaty+education+pact+inked/6327430/story.html#ixzz1pgBESo9r

by NationTalk on March 20, 2012339 Views

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‘Celebrating life’ at Thunder Bay Pow Wow‎ – CBC.ca

‘Celebrating life’ at Thunder Bay Pow Wow

Education, healing part of popular First Nations event

CBC News Posted: Mar 19, 2012

More than a thousand people packed Lakehead University’s annual Pow Wow over the weekend. The event drew First Nations people from across Ontario, south of the border, and Winnipeg.

There were non-Aboriginal faces in the crowd too, which Pow Wow master of ceremonies Jim Mishquart said was a welcome sight.

“Educating the non-native public in terms of the beauty of our culture is one of the main themes,” Mishquart said. “We also like to focus on … the beauties of our culture with them and to encourage them to also participate.”

Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/thunder-bay/story/2012/03/19/tby-powwow-weekend.html

by NationTalk on March 19, 2012601 Views

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Rejected aboriginal bid sparks backlash‎ – StarPhoenix

Rejected aboriginal bid sparks backlash

Proposed $6.6B refinery turned down

BY TERESA SMITH, POSTMEDIA NEWS MARCH 19, 2012

The Alberta government is facing a storm of criticism over its decision to reject a proposal for the first aboriginal-owned bitumen refinery in the oilsands.

The province insists the ruling last month to quash a proposed $6.6-billion bitumen refinery in its industrial heartland, was based solely on the project’s financial merits.

But the controversy over the move, which this week prompted the province’s Opposition Liberals to seek a probe by the ethics commissioner, has served to highlight a larger battle – over what part aboriginal communities will play in the future of the most lucrative industry in the country.

Read more: http://www.thestarphoenix.com/business/Rejected+aboriginal+sparks+backlash/6322510/story.html#ixzz1pZpiVKjq

by NationTalk on March 19, 2012336 Views

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Talents of aboriginal youth highlighted at celebration‎ – Calgary Herald

Talents of aboriginal youth highlighted at celebration

Stories shared through words, art, music

By Meghan Potkins, Calgary Herald March 19, 2012

For years, Tara Beaver was tormented by the feeling that her feet were planted in two different worlds.

A childhood spent bouncing between the Morley reserve, where she lives with her full-blooded Sioux mother, and the Cochrane home of her mostly white father, left her feeling confused and alone.

“I am part of both worlds. I grew up in two cultures,” Beaver said. “I was treated white on the reserve, and I’d come to Cochrane and I was treated native, and it was like, who am I?”

On Sunday, the 24-year-old shared her story at Mount Royal University with 200 people at an event celebrating the talents and achievements of Aboriginal youth.

Read more: http://www.calgaryherald.com/Talents+aboriginal+youth+highlighted+celebration/6322888/story.html#ixzz1pZpOxhcC

by NationTalk on March 19, 2012403 Views

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First Nations’ leader wants more resource revenue‎ – CTV Regina

First Nations’ leader wants more resource revenue

CTVNews.ca Staff
Date: Sunday Mar. 18, 2012

A Saskatchewan First Nations leader says Canada’s indigenous people haven’t received their fair share of the country’s lucrative natural resource revenues and hopes that will change in the wake of a critical UN report.

Little Black Bear First Nation Chief Perry Bellegarde made the comments after a United Nations committee last week criticized Canada’s treatment of its First Nations.

“Right now, Saskatchewan and industry enjoy the benefits from all the natural resource wealth and nothing is coming back to the indigenous people,” Bellegarde told CTVNews.ca.

Read more: http://regina.ctv.ca/servlet/an/local/CTVNews/20120318/first-nations-resource-plea-120318/20120318/?hub=Regina

by NationTalk on March 19, 2012450 Views

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Women’s council established‎ – The Chronicle Journal

Women’s council established

Northwest Bureau
Sunday, March 18, 2012

The Nishnawbe Aski Nation has a new NAN Women’s Council — the voice of women and families on the Aboriginal organization’s 49-member First Nations.

The newly-elected council consists of: Jackie Fletcher, Missanabie Cree First Nation; Rebecca Friday, of the Kashechewan First Nation; Lillian Hookimaw, Attawapiskat First Nation; Skylene Metatawabin, Fort Albany First Nation; Lisa Beardy, Muskrat Dam First Nation; Chief Lorraine Crane, Slate Falls First Nation; Annie Oskineegish, Nibinamik First Nation; Beulah Wabasse, Webequie First Nation and youth delegate Karla Kakagamic, Keewaywin First Nation.

Read more: http://www.chroniclejournal.com/content/news/local/2012/03/18/women%E2%80%99s-council-established

by NationTalk on March 19, 2012471 Views

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Alberta first nations hope basketball tournament helps repair …‎ – Globe and Mail

Alberta first nations hope basketball tournament helps repair reputation

JOSH WINGROVE
HOBBEMA, ALTA.— From Saturday’s Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Mar. 16, 2012

It was a bid the Alberta Schools’ Athletic Association had never seen before: Could a provincial boys high school basketball championship be held in Hobbema, a cluster of four small first nations with a dubious reputation?

The home-court Ermineskin Eagles are, to be sure, no all-star team. They lose more than they win and have a roster of just nine. Their spotless, matching blue Nike sneakers were donated so that all would have appropriate shoes. One player is deaf, none are exceptionally tall, several are playing organized basketball for the first time this year, and they didn’t win their zone and earn a spot in the tournament.

But they’re building something.

Hobbema is a collection of four reserves – Samson, Louis Bull, Montana and Ermineskin – long plagued by low graduation rates and associated with unemployment, gangs and crime sprees. At Ermineskin Junior Senior High School, which has 280 students in Grades 7 to 12, the Eagles are a team like no other, whether they win or not. They’re the face of a school trying to build no less than a culture of education, in part, through sports.

Read more: http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/alberta-first-nations-hope-basketball-tournament-helps-repair-reputation/article2372372/

by NationTalk on March 19, 2012436 Views

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Artwork a statement on Aboriginal affairs‎ – Brampton Guardian

Artwork a statement on Aboriginal affairs

ROGER BELGRAVE|Mar 18, 2012

Grade 8 students at a Brampton school have created artwork to honour the memory of Aboriginal children who died in Canada’s notorious residential schools.

The art was created as part of Project of Heart, a national initiative started to commemorate the thousands of children who died in the church-run, government-funded schools.

Small pieces of wooden tile are decorated to represent a child at a particular school. The tiles become part of a moving art display that can travel around the community or country to raise awareness about the historical and ongoing plight of Canada’s First Nations in hopes of inspiring Canadians to take action.

Read more: http://www.bramptonguardian.com/community/education/article/1319200–artwork-a-statement-on-aboriginal-affairs

by NationTalk on March 19, 2012376 Views

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Inquest Resumes into First Nations Student’s Death – CBC News

Inquest resumes into First Nations student’s death

Pre-inquest hearing in May to look at First Nation representation on new Thunder Bay jury roll

CBC News Posted: Mar 15, 2012

The regional coroner for northwestern Ontario plans to re-start the inquest into the death of Reggie Bushie.

The 15-year-old from Poplar Hill First Nation was found dead in Thunder Bay’s McIntyre River in 2007. He was in the city to attend high school.

Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/thunder-bay/story/2012/03/15/tby-coroner-inquest.html

by NationTalk on March 15, 2012516 Views

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Aboriginals March Today Against Police Violence – Winnipeg Free Press

Aboriginals march today against police violence

By: Staff Writer
Posted: 03/15/2012

A coalition of aboriginal advocacy groups is staging a rally and walk to City Hall today to protest what it claims is police violence against urban aboriginals.

The event begins at 2 p.m., at the Turtle Island Recreation Centre on Charles Walk in the North End, where a ceremony will be held in memory of Matthew Dumas, who was killed in a confrontation with police seven years ago.

The coalition, which includes Red Power United and Indigenous of Winnipeg against Police Brutality, cited Dumas’s death as an example of the violence directed by the Winnipeg Police Service towards urban aboriginal people.

Read more: http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/local/Aboriginals-march-today-against-police-violence-142756145.html

by NationTalk on March 15, 2012449 Views

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Commission Wraps Up Two-Day Stop in Port Alberni with Aim of Healing Survivors – Alberni Valley Times

Commission wraps up two-day stop in Port Alberni with aim of healing survivors

BY JULIA CARANCI, ALBERNI VALLEY TIMES MARCH 15, 2012

While the Truth and Reconciliation Commission heard many heartbreaking histories over the last two days, people also shared their tales of hope and healing.

In addition, the commission learned how important gaining back their culture is to Aboriginal People here.

The TRC wrapped up two days of hearings in Port Alberni on Tuesday.

The commission will visit more communities, both large and small, across the country in the coming months. The goal is to create a lasting record of survivors’ experiences while attending residential schools, which were run by various churches under contract to the government.

Read more: http://www.canada.com/Commission+wraps+stop+Port+Alberni+with+healing+survivors/6305409/story.html

by NationTalk on March 15, 2012404 Views

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Nunavut’s Newest Jail to Open this Fall in Rankin Inlet – Nunatsiaq Online

Nunavut’s newest jail to open this fall in Rankin Inlet

“We have a lot of work to do before we take in our first offender”

SARAH ROGERS

When Nunavut’s new “men’s healing facility” in Rankin Inlet opens in the fall of 2012, the $40-million jail for male territorial offenders, located near the airport, will quickly fill to capacity, given the few prison beds available in the territory.

But Nunavut corrections officials say they plan to introduce new inmates gradually, staggering new arrivals to give time for offenders and staff to adjust.

The Government of Nunavut takes possession of the territory’s 48-bed correctional centre later this month.

Read more: http://www.nunatsiaqonline.ca/stories/article/65674Nunavuts_newest_jail_to_open_this_fall_in_Rankin_Inlet_/

by NationTalk on March 15, 2012356 Views

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PM Hears Plea to Aid Aboriginal Education – The StarPhoenix

Pm hears plea to aid aboriginal education

BY JOE COUTURE, THE STARPHOENIX MARCH 14, 2012

REGINA — Premier Brad Wall says he has told the prime minister the province wants Ottawa to close a funding gap between students in First Nation schools and those in the provincial system.

After the topic was brought up by the NDP Tuesday during question period, Wall and Education Minister Donna Harpauer both said funding for First Nations schools must increase.

“There’s a huge gap in terms of on-reserve funding for education, which is the responsibility of the national government, and what we fund,” Wall told reporters later.

Read more: http://www.thestarphoenix.com/news/hears+plea+aboriginal+education/6299107/story.html#ixzz1pCYDOl8W

by NationTalk on March 15, 2012354 Views

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Kahnawake Seeks Quebec’s Help in Organized Crime Fight – CBC News

Kahnawake seeks Quebec’s help in organized crime fight

CBC News Posted: Mar 14, 2012

The Mohawk Council of Kahnawake is seeking the help of the Quebec public security ministry to help its Peacekeepers fight organized crime in the aboriginal territory near Châteauguay, Que.

It wants to set up a SWAT team made up exclusively of Mohawks – but trained by la Sûreté du Québec experts in organized crime.

The council said it’s facing increased pressure from the community to crack down on organized crime on its territory, not to mention concerns about its reputation among criminal elements outside the reserve.

“Some people have or had this impression Kahnawake is a lawless community, and they can move in here and set up shop,” said Lloyd Phillips, the chief on council in charge of community protection. “That certainly is not the truth. Our community doesn’t stand for that.”

Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/montreal/story/2012/03/13/montreal-kahnawake-organized-crime.html

by NationTalk on March 15, 2012407 Views

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Hundreds of Manitoba Flood Evacuees Still in Hotels – Winnipeg Free Press

Hundreds of Manitoba flood evacuees still in hotels

By Mia Rabson and Larry Kusch, Winnipeg Free Press March 14, 2012

OTTAWA — The cost of housing Manitoba First Nations residents forced from their homes last year by flooding now tops $40 million.

Nearly a year after flooding hit the province, 2,255 people are still unable to return home to seven communities. About 400 people are living in hotels while the rest are staying with friends and family.

Jeff Solmundson, a spokesman for Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada’s regional office in Manitoba, said the estimate for the costs of hotels, meals and daily allowances is about $40 million.

People living with friends and family still receive allowances from Ottawa to pay rent and food costs while they are out of their homes.

Read more: http://www.globalwinnipeg.com/Hundreds+Manitoba+flood+evacuees+still+hotels/6298057/story.html#ixzz1pCXgCgpQ

by NationTalk on March 15, 2012361 Views

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Nunavut, Nunavik Wrap Up the 2012 AWG with Hefty Ulu Counts – Nunatsiaq Online

Nunavut, Nunavik wrap up the 2012 AWG with hefty ulu counts

“Participating in the games helps us build both team and regional pride”

NUNATSIAQ NEWS
Around the Arctic March 14, 2012

Athletes from both Nunavik and Nunavut returned home this week a little richer, after the 2012 Arctic Winter Games wrapped up in Whitehorse March 10.

Athletes from both teams — about 230 from Nunavut and 53 from Nunavik — participated in a dozen activities at the Whitehorse games, including Arctic sports, Dene games, badminton, basketball, gymnastics, hockey, indoor soccer, speed skating, table tennis, wrestling, volleyball and snowshoeing.

The final tally: Team Nunavut finished with 50 ulus, while Team Nunavik-Quebec raked in 36.

Read more: http://www.nunatsiaqonline.ca/stories/article/65674nunavut_nunavik_wrap_up_the_2012_awg_with_hefty_ulu_counts/

by NationTalk on March 15, 2012337 Views

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SaskTel Expands 4G Coverage – The StarPhoenix

SaskTel expands 4G coverage

The StarPhoenix March 14, 2012

SaskTel has expanded its 4G wireless network to eight more locations across the province of Saskatchewan.

Three of the locations were completed as part of the previously announced First Nations Program, which will provide high speed Internet and 4G wireless service to 28 Saskatchewan First Nations by the end of 2012. The latest locations are Big Island Lake Cree Nation, Carry The Kettle First Nation and Ochapowace First Nation.

The other five tower locations, along with 4G coverage details, are Collins Bay (provides coverage to the mining region near Points North Landing); Scout Lake (provides coverage to the area south of Assiniboia including Highway 2); Smoky Burn (provides coverage to the area northeast of Carrot River including Highway 55); St. Warburg North (provides coverage to the area north of St. Warburg including Highway 26); Waskesiu Lake Rural (provides improved coverage in the Waskesiu area including highway 264).

Read more: http://www.thestarphoenix.com/technology/SaskTel+expands+coverage/6299271/story.html#ixzz1pCWJyPez

by NationTalk on March 15, 2012389 Views

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Aboriginal leaders fear withdrawal crisis after OxyContin production halted – Vancouver Sun

Aboriginal leaders fear withdrawal crisis after OxyContin production halted

By Alexandra Paul, Winnipeg Free Press March 13, 2012

WINNIPEG — Some aboriginal leaders are bracing for the worst after the production of OxyContin was halted two weeks ago.

Approximately one in every three residents, up to 9,000 people in an aboriginal population of 25,000 in northwestern Ontario, are addicted to the painkiller, which is also known as hillbilly heroin.

Remote aboriginal communities have some breathing room before a potential crises begins because officials anticipated addicts built up illegal stockpiles of OxyContin after Purdue Pharma announced it would halt OxyContin production on March 1.

Read more: http://www.globalwinnipeg.com/Aboriginal+leaders+fear+withdrawal+crisis+after+OxyContin+production+halted/6292055/story.html#ixzz1p0qyqlf4

by NationTalk on March 13, 2012549 Views

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Slaughter of caribou protested by First Nations not illegal: province – 680 News

Slaughter of caribou protested by First Nations not illegal: province

Chinta Puxley, The Canadian Press Mar 12, 2012

WINNIPEG – Provincial investigators say the killing of dozens of caribou decried by Manitoba First Nations groups last week as wasteful and uncalled for was perfectly legal.

Tim Cameron, the province’s chief natural resources officer, said conservation officials looked into the matter immediately after a northern chief discovered the bloody carcasses of 30 animals near Lynn Lake. The officers found the area was a popular butchering site and the animals were killed over a period of time.

Although First Nations chiefs complained about the killing, saying meat was left to rot, Cameron said officers didn’t find any whole carcasses that were abandoned.

Read more: http://www.680news.com/news/national/article/340210–slaughter-of-caribou-protested-by-first-nations-not-illegal-province

by NationTalk on March 13, 2012393 Views

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Inquiry adjourns to replace natives’ lawyer – Vancouver Sun

Inquiry adjourns to replace natives’ lawyer

Chief says move to find new aboriginal-interests representative is ‘too little, too late’

By Neal Hall, Vancouver Sun March 13, 2012

The Missing Women inquiry is taking a break to replace the lawyer representing aboriginal interests, who quit last week.

Inquiry Commissioner Wally Oppal said Monday that he has asked commission counsel Art Vertlieb to find a lawyer to rep-resent aboriginal interests and will allow that lawyer time to get up to speed.

The inquiry adjourned until April 2.

This comes after the surprise resignation last week of Robyn Gervais, a Metis lawyer appointed by the commission last August to represent aboriginal interests.

Read more: http://www.vancouversun.com/news/Inquiry+adjourns+replace+natives+lawyer/6292829/story.html#ixzz1p0drZDEt

by NationTalk on March 13, 2012374 Views

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Growing aboriginal population running into urban barriers – Hamilton Spectator

Growing aboriginal population running into urban barriers

Danielle Wong Mon Mar 12 2012

Hamilton’s aboriginal population, now at 15,000, has doubled since 2006

Yvonne Maracle got into a number of fights growing up in Hamilton.

“I was the little ‘Indian kid’ that people would pick on and, at that time, there weren’t many of us,” she said.

But it wasn’t until Maracle started working for the now-closed Native Indian Inuit Photographers’ Association in Hamilton that she realized part of her history was missing.

“When I went to school, I learned we were savages,” the community development officer for the Hamilton Executive Directors’ Aboriginal Coalition said Saturday, sitting on a panel exploring urban aboriginal issues at The Freeway Café. “I learned negative things about my culture and I didn’t really learn about positive things about our contributions to Canada.”

Read more: http://www.thespec.com/news/local/article/686094–growing-aboriginal-population-running-into-urban-barriers

by NationTalk on March 13, 2012560 Views

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Let’s employ our own citizens: Hancock – Calgary Herald

Let’s employ our own citizens: Hancock

By Bill Mah, Edmonton Journal March 12, 2012

Whether you have a job in Alberta depends so much on who you are.

Despite government and industry raising the alarm on a looming skills shortage that some say is already here, some groups of potential workers remain largely untapped, even as the jobless rate shrinks.

In Calgary, the unemployment rate dipped to 5.2 per cent in February from 5.4 per cent in January. In Edmonton, the unemployment rate in January was five per cent, continuing its steady recovery from the last recession.

Drive south for an hour to Hobbema, and the rate rockets to more than 50 per cent.

Read more: http://www.edmontonjournal.com/business/employ+citizens+Hancock/6287102/story.html#ixzz1ovNhVOx0

by NationTalk on March 12, 2012407 Views

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Ktunaxa nation receives educational grants – Kootenay News

Ktunaxa nation receives educational grants

By Contributed – Kootenay News Advertiser
Published: March 12, 2012

Interior Health’s Aboriginal Health program has awarded 16 educational grants to Aboriginal not-for-profit organizations and governments across the region to enhance the public health skill sets of aboriginal residents.

“Across the province the health status of Aboriginal people is improving but we still have a long way go,” said Minister of Aboriginal Relations and Reconciliation Mary Polak. “By working with Aboriginal stakeholders, and addressing their needs, we are ensuring care is being delivered in a culturally appropriate manner.”

“The goal of the IH Aboriginal Health Team is to work collaboratively with Aboriginal organizations and governments to improve the health of Aboriginal people within the region and I am pleased to see $200,000 in funding allocated to this important initiative,” said IH Board Chair Norman Embree.

Read more: http://www.kootenayadvertiser.com/news/142245955.html

by NationTalk on March 12, 2012456 Views

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Native Studies at SJAM Set to Beat of a Drum – hwdsb.on.ca

Native Studies at SJAM Set to Beat of a Drum

Monday, March 12, 2012

Cassandra Zaugg-Bice walks confidently off stage after rehearsal. Dancers in regalia slow their rotations. Drummers lower their sticks, and voices. Sage fills the air as Cassandra describes how native studies at Sir John A. Macdonald secondary have changed her worldview, and her life.

“This is an amazing program, and I’m not just trying to butter you up,” says the 17-year-old, who takes the bus from Upper Gage and Rymal downtown to SJAM each day. She’s taking Current Aboriginal Issues in Canada, Native Arts, Aboriginal English, Indigenous Issues Through a Global Context, and she does an after-school restorative justice circle three days a week.

“You learn a lot of lessons about Aboriginal people. You don’t want to be late for class because it shows disrespect for yourself, your culture, your elders and the other students. I want to be a good example for my culture and myself,” says Cassandra, of the Mississaugas of the New Credit.

Read more: http://www.hwdsb.on.ca/media/news/details.aspx?id=1537&Page=0&year=&profiling=

by NationTalk on March 12, 2012525 Views

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Aboriginal foster parents aided by kit – CBC.ca

Aboriginal foster parents aided by kit

CBC News Posted: Mar 12, 2012

A P.E.I. aboriginal student has put together a resource kit to help social workers and foster parents better understand the culture of aboriginal children in their care.

Emily Ferguson received funding from the Mi’kmaq Confederacy of P.E.I. for the kit, and created it while on a student job placement with the Department of Child and Family Services. The new kit will provide workers with the tools to educate, promote and preserve a child’s Aboriginal identity.

“So for example, if a social worker would like to get information on what a smudge is, or where to go for a powwow, they can look in the resource package,” said Ferguson.

Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/prince-edward-island/story/2012/03/12/pei-aboriginal-foster-parent-kit-584.html

by NationTalk on March 12, 2012609 Views

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Courts could overturn ‘unreasonable’ consultation on Enbridge pipeline, feds … – Financial Post

Courts could overturn ‘unreasonable’ consultation on Enbridge pipeline, feds warned

Postmedia News Mar 12, 2012
By Mike De Souza

OTTAWA — Senior bureaucrats from multiple federal departments have been warned that the review process for a proposed pipeline linking Alberta’s oilsands sector with the northwest coast of British Columbia could be overturned by the courts because of an “unreasonable” consultation with aboriginal communities, according to newly-released internal records.

The warnings, delivered by the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency, noted that the federal government was facing “adverse legal consequences” if it failed to offer adequate funding to help First Nations communities fully participate in consultations with the necessary resources to review evidence, material and proposals made by Alberta-based Enbridge regarding the Northern Gateway Pipeline project.

“Lack of funding may limit the ability of aboriginal groups to reasonably and meaningfully participate in the consultation and environmental assessment process,” said the agency in a presentation that was released by the Department of Fisheries and Oceans through access to information legislation. “If aboriginal groups cannot consult meaningfully due to a lack of resources and capacities, and if the Crown fails to provide adequate funding, (there is a) moderate to high risk that the courts would find the consultation process to be unreasonable.”

Read more: http://business.financialpost.com/2012/03/12/courts-could-overturn-unreasonable-consultation-on-enbridge-pipeline-feds-warned/?__lsa=6540fb09

by NationTalk on March 12, 2012497 Views

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Oppal misses opportunity to make inquiry meaningful process – Vancouver Sun

Oppal misses opportunity to make inquiry meaningful process

BY IAN MULGREW, VANCOUVER SUN MARCH 12, 2012

The B.C. Missing Women inquiry is on the cusp of committing the very sin its supporters hoped it would help address – institutional racism.

In response to the withdrawal of aboriginal participation and the criticism of first nations, Commissioner Wally Oppal circled the wagons and opened fire.

He could not have chosen a more inappropriate response.

His paternalistic reaction to the emotional departure of the last native lawyer standing, Robyn Gervais, didn’t placate. Ironically, for many, it con-firmed the worst.

Read more: http://www.vancouversun.com/life/Oppal+misses+opportunity+make+inquiry+meaningful+process/6286835/story.html#ixzz1ovL7w1Vj

by NationTalk on March 12, 2012396 Views

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Lakehead University President Stevenson Co-leading Trip to Mexico to explore … – Net Newsledger

Lakehead University President Stevenson Co-leading Trip to Mexico to explore Indigenous Education Partnerships

Written by: James Murray on March 11, 2012

THUNDER BAY – Lakehead University President and Vice-Chancellor Dr. Brian Stevenson, and University of Regina President and Vice-Chancellor Dr. Vianne Timmons are co-leading a group of Canadian universities on a trip to Mexico City to discuss Indigenous higher education. Representatives from Canada and Mexico will spend March 11-12 establishing partnerships and gaining a better understanding of the complexities surrounding the issue.

President Stevenson says accessibility is one of his top priorities. “Changing the face of education for Indigenous people is a long but important journey,” he said. “At Lakehead, we have been successful in removing barriers to education, including economic, geographic and cultural. Our proven and successful model is based on active recruitment and strong transition support. We hope to share our successes and challenges on this trip.”

Read more: http://netnewsledger.com/2012/03/11/lakehead-university-president-stevenson-co-leading-trip-to-mexico-to-explore-indigenous-education-partnerships/

by NationTalk on March 12, 2012399 Views

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