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Aboriginal design focus of showcase – Regina Leader-Post

Aboriginal design focus of showcase

Street wear, green fashion on display

BY IRENE SEIBERLING, LEADER-POST JUNE 18, 2012

Regina may not be a Canadian fashion mecca – yet. But the Queen City is certainly increasing its presence in the Canadian fashion scene.

In May, Regina hosted the first-ever Saskatchewan Fashion Week, which showcased many of the province’s emerging and established fashion designers. This week, the focus will be on Aboriginal designs – street wear, eco-friendly fashions and formal wear – as Regina hosts its first National Aboriginal Fashion Week.

“I’m trying to help them break into the mainstream,” event organizer Chelsa Reil said. “I think having all the aboriginal designers come together showing their designs and creativity will be great.”

Read more: http://www.leaderpost.com/life/fashion-beauty/Aboriginal+design+focus+showcase/6797686/story.html#ixzz1yADTSDLN

by NationTalk on June 18, 2012535 Views

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Students get view of homelessness – Sudbury Star

Students get view of homelessness

By HEATHER CAMPBELL, FOR THE SUDBURY STAR

Christian MacDonald knows firsthand what it’s like to be a kid and homeless.

“I can relate to the poverty,” MacDonald said. “I got kicked out of my house and had to go stay at a park until a friend took me in for three weeks.”

MacDonald, now 17 and a Grade 11 student at Sudbury Secondary School, was just 13 at the time.

Family members in Sudbury eventually took him in and helped him to stay on track and work toward finishing high school. He is now a member of the First Nations, Metis and Inuit Leadership Group with the Rainbow District School Board.

Read more: http://www.thesudburystar.com/ArticleDisplay.aspx?e=3586549

by NationTalk on June 18, 2012521 Views

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A peek at Toronto’s little-seen War of 1812 relics – CBC

A peek at Toronto’s little-seen War of 1812 relics

CBC News Posted: Jun 18, 2012

The City of Toronto began commemorating the bicentennial of the War of 1812 more than a month ago with a series of exhibitions, talks and performances.

Attendees can get an up-close look at artifacts from conflict, particularly the Battle of York in what is now Toronto, which took place some 10 months after the U.S. declared war on the British on June 18, 1812.

But there are many items from the period that the public will not get to see that are holed up in the Toronto museum services’ collections and conservations centre, a six-storey building that stores thousands of artifacts that make up the city’s museum collections.

The location of the facility cannot be disclosed for security reasons, but CBC News was given access to some of the rarely-seen artifacts inside.

Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/toronto/story/2012/06/17/war-1812-relics-toronto-slideshow369.html

by NationTalk on June 18, 2012490 Views

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Aboriginal Affairs Minister supports ‘thrust’ of private member’s bill to replace Indian Act – Hill Times

Aboriginal Affairs Minister supports ‘thrust’ of private member’s bill to replace Indian Act

John Duncan says the spirit of Conservative backbencher’s bill is appropriate, but critics and aboriginal groups slam sponsor for failing to consult with First Nations.

By CHRIS PLECASH |
Published: Monday, 06/18/2012

Aboriginal Affairs Minister John Duncan says he’s open to a Conservative backbencher’s private member’s bill that would require the minister to report annually on efforts to replace the Indian Act, but aboriginal groups and critics say the bill’s sponsor failed to consult with First Nations before introducing the bill.

Conservative backbencher Rob Clarke (Desnethé-Missinippi-Churchill River, Sask.) introduced Bill C-428, An Act to Amend the Indian Act and Provide for its Replacement, on June 4. If passed, the private member’s bill would repeal some aspects of the Indian Act pertaining to property, education, and governance, and would require the minister of Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development to report annually to Parliament on efforts between the department and aboriginal groups to replace the Indian Act.

Mr. Clarke, a member of the Muskeg Lake First Nation, told The Hill Times that his past experience as an RCMP officer enforcing the Indian Act in Saskatchewan motivated him to initiate a replacement to the “archaic” 136-year-old legislation.

Read more: http://www.hilltimes.com/policy-briefing/2012/06/18/aboriginal-affairs-minister-supports-%E2%80%98thrust%E2%80%99-of-private-member%E2%80%99s/31096

by NationTalk on June 18, 2012652 Views

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Feds flagged Enbridge for inadequate spill response plan: document – Vancouver Sun

Feds flagged Enbridge for inadequate spill response plan: document

BY MIKE DE SOUZA, POSTMEDIA NEWS JUNE 17, 2012

OTTAWA – Federal officials flagged safety concerns about Enbridge`s proposed Northern Gateway pipeline project nearly two years ago, while warning that the Alberta-based proponent had an “insufficient” oil spill response plan along sensitive areas on its route from Alberta to the British Columbia coast, internal records reveal.

The warnings were highlighted during a meeting by a team of environmental assessment experts from multiple government departments, including Natural Resources Canada, the Department of Fisheries and Oceans, Environment Canada, Transport Canada and Aboriginal and Northern Affairs Canada.

A spokeswoman for Enbridge said an updated oil spill response plan, submitted in March 2011 to a panel reviewing the project, provides updated information that the government would not have known about at the time of the meeting.

Read more: http://www.timescolonist.com/news/Feds+flagged+Enbridge+inadequate+spill+response+plan+document/6796894/story.html#ixzz1yA8d0QZv

by NationTalk on June 18, 2012395 Views

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Literacy spells success for aboriginal youth – Calgary Herald

Craig & Marc Kielburger: Literacy spells success for aboriginal youth

By Craig & Marc Kielburger, Calgary Herald June 18, 2012

After passing out from a cocktail of pills, Sally awoke to find a friend dead beside her. She knew she had to change. She was only 15. It would not be an easy path.

She’d spent her early years in and out of shelters, cared for by a mom who was a drug addict. Sally’s education had been sporadic. She could neither read nor write.

When she was 14, the Children’s Aid Society took her away from her mom. She fled the Oshawa, Ont., group home where she’d been placed; on the streets, she turned to drugs.

Read more: http://www.calgaryherald.com/literacy/raiseareader/Craig+Marc+Kielburger+Literacy+spells+success+aboriginal+youth/6798238/story.html#ixzz1yA86bxG3

by NationTalk on June 18, 2012427 Views

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First Nations activist navigates oilsands fight – Edmonton Journal

First Nations activist navigates oilsands fight

BY TRISH AUDETTE, EDMONTON JOURNAL JUNE 18, 2012

Eriel Deranger was 12 when her father took her north of Fort McMurray, within sight of the Syncrude and Suncor oilsands facilities, to teach her about traditional hunting, trapping and fishing.

“My mom and dad were very political people,” says Deranger, who is now a mother. “My dad sort of told us that we have to stop these projects.”

Now 33, Deranger has become something of an official face for her community’s opposition to ramped-up oilsands development in the face of lingering questions about its impacts on the health of the Athabasca Chipewyan First Nations, air and water quality, and fish and wildlife.

Read more: http://www.edmontonjournal.com/business/First+Nations+activist+navigates+oilsands+fight/6798325/story.html

by NationTalk on June 18, 2012405 Views

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NDP wants real partnership with First Nations, Inuit, and Métis – Hill Times

NDP wants real partnership with First Nations, Inuit, and Métis

By NDP MP JEAN CROWDER |
Published: Monday, 06/18/2012

PARLIAMENT HILL—New Democrats believe that our relationship with First Nations, Inuit, and Métis peoples in Canada needs to be based on a partnership, the same one that built our country.

We will establish this new partnership by forging a new relationship with First Nations, Inuit, and Métis peoples, fostering economic opportunity and lasting prosperity, ending the discrimination still faced by aboriginal peoples in Canada and supporting the process of healing the harms of past injustices. We think there are a few priorities that will help support that relationship.

Since First Nations, Inuit, and Métis are the youngest and fastest-growing populations in Canada; this is the time to make investments in the educations’ systems that will prepare them to become citizens.

Read more: http://www.hilltimes.com/policy-briefing/2012/06/18/ndp-wants-real-partnership-with-first-nations-inuit-and-m%C3%A9tis/31102

by NationTalk on June 18, 2012375 Views

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Labour shortage at issue – Alberta Daily Herald

Labour shortage at issue

MPs discuss changes to policy; demographics for future employment

By Graeme Bruce Herald Tribune staff

Grande Prairie businesses don’t have the workforce needed for the economic boom, and there are three demographics which will ease demand for labour while stoking the embers of the economy: Young people, First Nations and temporary foreign workers (TFW).

Chris Warkentin, member of Parliament for Peace River along with the secretary to the Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development Canada Kellie Leitch were on hand to discuss these demographics along with the recent changes the federal government made to unemployment insurance (EI).

The two MPs fielded questions from local business owners and community members about what the government is doing about the shortage and how it will affect Grande Prairie during a roundtable discussion hosted by the Grande Prairie and District Chamber of Commerce on June 16 at Centre 2000.

Read more: http://www.dailyheraldtribune.com/ArticleDisplay.aspx?e=3586488

by NationTalk on June 18, 2012462 Views

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‘Healing of our communities’ – Western Star

‘Healing of our communities’

Published on June 18, 2012
Frank Gale

FLAT BAY Jackie Snook said members of the Flat Bay Indian Band Council will be celebrating Aboriginal Awareness Day, along with the summer solstice Thursday, with a number of activities aimed towards the healing of their community.

She said while there won’t be as many activities taking place as they had hoped, the Flat Bay band still wants to celebrate the “healing of our communities” as outlined in a message from Chief Misel Joe of Conne River.

A Sacred Fire will be lit as the sun breaks the horizon and the fire will continue burning until sunset.

Read more: http://www.thewesternstar.com/News/Local/2012-06-18/article-3010679/%26lsquoHealing-of-our-communities%26rsquo/1

by NationTalk on June 18, 2012419 Views

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Eight ways to mark National Aboriginal Day – Anglican Church

Eight ways to mark National Aboriginal Day

ALI SYMONS, ANGLICAN CHURCH OF CANADA

June 15, 2012 – Anglicans have long marked National Aboriginal Day, June 21. Some celebrate it on the day or the closest Sunday. Others celebrate it as part of a Month of Healing and Reconciliation, May 26 to June 21. Here are some ways you and your parish can launch or add variety to your own celebrations, as recommended by Henriette Thompson, General Synod’s public witness coordinator for social justice.

1. Use propers for National Aboriginal Day

These propers—collect, sentence, readings, and more—are available in English and French. They were approved by General Synod 2010.

Read more: http://news.anglican.ca/news/stories/2503

by NationTalk on June 18, 2012379 Views

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Two spirits – history and challenges? – Regina Leader-Post

Two spirits – history and challenges

BY MICHELE TYNDALL, FOR L-P SPECIALTY PRODUCTS JUNE 18, 2012

“Two-spirited” is a term that is usually used to describe a person who manifests both the male and the female spirit. It can also be used to describe a person with two contrasting human spirits, such as mother and warrior, or two animal spirits, such as wolf and eagle. The term is connected with First Nations cultural beliefs and practices.

The term two spirited has become more popular as a way for First Nations persons to express gender identity and sexuality with a specific tie to their Native culture, spiritual beliefs and values. Two spirit has replaced the word berdache, a label most commonly attached in a negative way to men with feminine characteristics that, while once used by anthropologists, has become outdated and inappropriate in today’s society.

Read more: http://www.leaderpost.com/technology/spirits+history+challenges/6797697/story.html#ixzz1yA4w00yi

by NationTalk on June 18, 2012455 Views

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Powwow passes traditions to new generation‎ – CBC

Powwow passes traditions to new generation

CBC News Posted: Jun 17, 2012

More than 100 First Nations dancers, dressed in traditional regalia, participated in the grand entry of the St. Mary’s Powwow on Saturday.

The event, which is in its 14th year, is gaining a reputation as one of the best powwows in Canada.

Chief Candice Paul of the St. Mary’s First Nation said young generations take a lot away from the three-day event.

“Self-esteem is very important, especially in our youth — understanding who they are and where they come from, and being proud of who they are,” she said.

Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/new-brunswick/story/2012/06/17/nb-st-marys-powwow-559.html

by NationTalk on June 18, 2012385 Views

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Protesters block First Nation members from voting on B.C. treaty ratification‎ – Winnipeg Free Press

Protesters block First Nation members from voting on B.C. treaty ratification

By: The Canadian Press
Posted: 06/17/2012

POWELL RIVER, B.C. – A small group of native protesters used trucks and a car to physically block fellow members of a British Columbia First Nation from voting on a treaty with the provincial and federal governments over the weekend.

Clint Williams, chief of the Tla’amin First Nation, also known as the Sliammon, said between 200 and 250 people were expected to vote on the deal at the Salish Centre near Powell River, B.C., on Saturday.

But he said that vote must now be rescheduled, amidst charges by band leaders and even the provincial government that the protesters have derailed a fundamental democratic right and Canadian process.

Meantime, the protesters have issued a statement of their own, saying they are taking a stand against the treaty because they still have many unanswered questions.

Read more: http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/canada/protesters-block-first-nation-members-from-voting-on-bc-treaty-ratification-159367095.html

by NationTalk on June 18, 2012396 Views

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Powwow focuses on honour, tradition and youth – Moose Jaw Times-Herald

Powwow focuses on honour, tradition and youth

Published on June 17, 2012
Cole Carruthers

The beautiful weather Moose Jaw received Saturday arrived with perfect timing for outdoor celebration and revelry.

The Wakamow Aboriginal Community Association (WACA) hosted a powwow in Moose Jaw on Gutheridge Field next to the Empire Community School on Saturday.

WACA held the event for Aboriginal History Month, and to coincide with honouring the youth at Empire Community School.

“I dance in the flags and dance some rounds… I’m usually one of the last ones to dance, its exciting to dance for the people and have them cheer. Hawk Obey, a fancy feather double bustle dancer told the Times-Herald.

Read more: http://www.mjtimes.sk.ca/Local/News/2012-06-17/article-3010758/Powwow-focuses-on-honour,-tradition-and-youth/1

by NationTalk on June 18, 2012546 Views

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Meeting strengthens relationship between Aboriginal community and police – MetroNews

Meeting strengthens relationship between Aboriginal community and police

June 17, 2012
By Morgan Modjeski

A meeting held over the weekend between the Aboriginal Affairs Coalition of Saskatchewan (AACS) and chief of the Saskatoon Police Service, Clive Weighill, about racial profiling yielded positive results says AACS president, Kim Beaudin.

“This was an opportunity for aboriginal people to have a one-on-one with the chief of police,” said Beaudin. “That kind of forum is very important for the relationship so we’re going to continue to do that.”

“We believe it’s an excellent time for him to address any concerns and to hear from the community,” he said. “Communication is a two way street.”

Beaudin also said the meeting was an opportunity for those who were intimidated by the SPS to communicate with them in an environment outside of a meeting on the street.

Read more: http://metronews.ca/news/saskatoon/266266/meeting-strengthens-relationship-between-aboriginal-community-and-police/

by NationTalk on June 18, 2012391 Views

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Closing the ‘achievement gap’ for Toronto’s aboriginal students – Toronto Star

Closing the ‘achievement gap’ for Toronto’s aboriginal students

Published On Sat Jun 16 2012
Louise Brown
Education Reporter

A world away from Attawapiskat, here in the big city where there is plumbing and heat and social supports on every corner, a hidden population of aboriginal students still tumbles through the educational cracks.

They are undetected on the public radar, lost behind more high-profile waves of immigrants who take their turn in the spotlight. But the largest group of aboriginals live not in scattered northern outposts, but in the GTA — some have called Toronto the biggest First Nation reserve in the country. They likely number 70,000 and they’re the fastest-growing group of homegrown Canadians, with nearly twice the birth rate of everyone else.

So it’s alarming that they still struggle with learning, even here in the south, in schools paid for by the richer funding formula of Queen’s Park, not the cash-starved portables on federally funded outposts.

Read more: http://www.thestar.com/news/article/1212344–this-school-makes-me-proud-of-who-i-am

by NationTalk on June 18, 2012475 Views

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Closing the ‘achievement gap’ for Toronto’s aboriginal students – Toronto Star

Closing the ‘achievement gap’ for Toronto’s aboriginal students

Louise Brown
Education Reporter

A world away from Attawapiskat, here in the big city where there is plumbing and heat and social supports on every corner, a hidden population of aboriginal students still tumbles through the educational cracks.

They are undetected on the public radar, lost behind more high-profile waves of immigrants who take their turn in the spotlight. But the largest group of aboriginals live not in scattered northern outposts, but in the GTA — some have called Toronto the biggest First Nation reserve in the country. They likely number 70,000 and they’re the fastest-growing group of homegrown Canadians, with nearly twice the birth rate of everyone else.

So it’s alarming that they still struggle with learning, even here in the south, in schools paid for by the richer funding formula of Queen’s Park, not the cash-starved portables on federally funded outposts.

Read more: http://www.thestar.com/news/article/1212344–this-school-makes-me-proud-of-who-i-am

by NationTalk on June 16, 2012696 Views

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Test your knowledge of the War of 1812 – Ottawa Citizen

Test your knowledge of the War of 1812

By By Postmedia News, Postmedia News June 15, 2012

What do you know about the War of 1812? Take the Historica-Dominion Institute quiz and see.

1. Which Aboriginal chief led his warriors in the capture of Detroit in 1812?

Tecumseh
Big Bear
Louis Riel
Crazy Horse
William Claus
Louis-Joseph Papineau

Answer: General Brock launched his counter-attack against the Americans after they had invaded Sandwich (now Windsor), Ont. Brock decided to use his force of 730 men, and 600 Aboriginal allies, led by Tecumseh, in capturing Fort Detroit. Tecumseh and Brock were able to capture Detroit, despite facing a larger force of 2,100 Americans.

Read more: http://www.canada.com/life/Test+your+knowledge+1812/6789743/story.html#ixzz1xvaLRdTx

by NationTalk on June 16, 2012634 Views

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Celebrating Aboriginal Day – Portage Daily Graphic

Celebrating Aboriginal Day

By Robin Dudgeon, The Central Plains Herald-Leader

The Portage Friendship Centre’s annual Aboriginal Day celebration is coming up June 21 when the community can gather together to celebrate First Nations and Metis culture.

Things get underway at Island Park on June 21 at 1 p.m. for a free day of entertainment food, and family fun.

The event will include a barbecue of hamburgers and hot dogs as well as more traditional foods such as bannock and soup, and entertainment including pow-wow dancers and drummers, and more contemporary rock and country artists like Brothers in Stone.

Read more: http://www.portagedailygraphic.com/ArticleDisplay.aspx?e=3585935

by NationTalk on June 16, 2012675 Views

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‘Working like hell’ – London Free Press

‘Working like hell’

SPECIAL REPORT: Like a rare painting that turns up in a garage sale, an old barn on the site of a London-area native residential school has astounded scholars with revealing messages left behind on its walls by some of the 1,200 children forced to attend the Mount Elgin farm school before it was shut down in 1946.

By RANDY RICHMOND AND PATRICK CALLAN, THE LONDON FREE PRESS
Last Updated: June 15, 2012

MUNCEY – Pencil-fine and fading, the words mark the barn beams and posts like small animal tracks on woodland paths.

They’re discernible only to those looking for them, in some places forced to kneel with flashlight and magnifying glass in hand.

Fragments appear on the dusty grain: “making us slave,” “walk on tracks for 2000000 miles,” “run away.”

Other tracks surface with sad clarity.

“Ponty John was around here without a friend. So long boys.”

Read more: http://www.lfpress.com/news/london/2012/06/15/19884506.html

by NationTalk on June 16, 2012592 Views

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Demand for prekindergarten outpaces new programs – StarPhoenix

Demand for prekindergarten outpaces new programs

By Janet French, The StarPhoenix June 15, 2012

Five Saskatoon schools — two Catholic and three public — will get extra prekindergarten classes come fall.

But demand for the program is so great, the Greater Saskatoon Catholic school division could likely fill an extra class at every school where prekindergarten is currently offered, says superintendent of education Joanne Weninger.

“We feel really blessed to be able to serve the number of children we can serve at this point,” Weninger said. “It is always difficult to turn parents and children away.”

Come September, the Catholic division will have 25 prekindergarten classes in 11 schools (one is in Humboldt), and the public division will have 35 classes in 14 city schools. Most are on Saskatoon’s west side, with the exceptions of St. Frances in the Exhibition area and Sutherland school. The half-day program is free, and can include busing.

Read more: http://www.thestarphoenix.com/news/Demand+prekindergarten+outpaces+programs/6791010/story.html#ixzz1xvZ26K3K

by NationTalk on June 16, 2012589 Views

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Brian Hutchinson on the Pickton Inquiry: Whole story still untold – National Post

Brian Hutchinson on the Pickton Inquiry: Whole story still untold

Brian Hutchinson Jun 15, 2012

Near the end of the hearings, with questions still hanging and more tempers flaring, and police and their counsel pointing fingers again, a lawyer for one RCMP witness approached this reporter.

“What are we doing here? Look at all of us,” he said, scanning the room where the Missing Women Commission of Inquiry held its hearings. A room in downtown Vancouver, filled with some of the city’s finest legal minds, but also with anger, recrimination, loss. The lawyer shook his head. “What’s been the point?”

The inquiry was called to examine why, from 1997 to February 2002, the Vancouver Police Department and the RCMP failed to stop Robert (Willie) Pickton — their prime suspect in dozens of cases of missing women — from apprehending his victims and chopping their corpses into pieces. He was killing prostitutes, right under the noses of police. Wally Oppal, the former provincial attorney general appointed to lead the inquiry, called an end to the hearings last week. He says he wants to make recommendations to ensure such an outrage never happens again.

Read more: http://fullcomment.nationalpost.com/2012/06/15/brian-hutchinson-on-the-pickton-inquiry-whole-story-still-untold/

by NationTalk on June 16, 2012683 Views

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Ktunaxa Nation flag flies proudly for Aboriginal Day – Cranbrook Daily

Ktunaxa Nation flag flies proudly for Aboriginal Day

JUNE 15, 2012
ANNALEE GRANT

The wind was gently sending the flags flapping in the air as the Bloodline Drum Group took their seats for the Ktunaxa Flag Song on June 14.

As the circle of woman sang, the flag was pulled higher over Mount Baker Secondary School to mark the week leading up to Aboriginal Day on June 21.

The community will celebrate on June 22 at the St. Eugene Gold Resort and Casino, but the flag raising ceremony marked a change in attitudes that many of the gathered elders could never imagine when they were high school aged.

Read more: http://www.dailytownsman.com/article/20120615/CRANBROOK0101/306159997/-1/cranbrook01/ktunaxa-nation-flag-flies-proudly-for-aboriginal-day

by NationTalk on June 16, 20121010 Views

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Have your say‎ – Winnipeg Free Press

Have your say

Winnipeg Free Press

More than symbolic

In her June 13 article It’s a small amount, but a big symbol, Katherine Dow speaks of the treaties between First Nations and the Crown, and the resultant annual treaty payments, as a symbolic social event. But it’s much more than that.

The Royal Proclamation of 1763 established the official process for negotiating subsequent Crown acquisition (read “expropriation”) of title to Indian lands. Following the American Revolution, some 23 treaties were entered into in what was then Upper Canada.

The Robinson-Huron, Robinson Superior and Manitoulin treaties were signed during the period from 1850 to 1862. The largest community on Manitoulin Island proudly proclaims itself as Wikwemikong Unceded First Nation, as its chief in 1862 refused to sign the Manitoulin Treaty.

Read more: http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/opinion/letters_to_the_editor/have-your-say-159161435.html

by NationTalk on June 15, 2012531 Views

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Jeremy’s Case, Jordan’s Principle‎ – The Dominion

Jeremy’s Case, Jordan’s Principle

Historic court case in Halifax identifies gap in health services for First Nations children

by MOIRA PETERS
JUNE 15, 2012

HALIFAX—In a precedent-setting case that continued in Halifax on Monday, Maurina Beadle and Pictou Landing First Nation took the Government of Canada to court over its failure to provide Beadle’s son the same level of health care that a child living off-reserve would receive from the province of Nova Scotia.

On the fourth anniversary of Prime Minister Stephen Harper’s historic apology to First Nations people for the forced separation of children from their families under the residential school system, the Mi’kmaq mother was in court fighting for the health services that would allow her son Jeremy to remain at home under her care.

“All the things that were promised in Harper’s apology are things they are not doing for Jeremy,” said Philippa Pictou, Health Director for Pictou Landing First Nation, sitting on a bench in courtroom 501 in the Law Courts on Lower Water Street in Halifax on Monday morning. “Kids being pushed into institutions, instead of being cared for at home.”

Read more: http://www.dominionpaper.ca/articles/4518

by NationTalk on June 15, 2012606 Views

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Campbell charges inaction on mercury‎ – Daily Miner and News

Campbell charges inaction on mercury

JON THOMPSON
Miner and News

As last week’s Toronto-based actions known as River Run wound down for members of Asubpeeschoseewagong First Nation (Grassy Narrows), Kenora-Rainy River MPP, Sarah Campbell weighed in on mercury contamination in the Wabigoon River System, calling government inaction “shameful,” and implying the province’s approach has been racist.

She condemned the necessity Grassy Narrows saw in attracting Japanese scientists led by Dr. Masazumi Harada, who passed away from Leukemia on Monday evening.

“I find it extremely troubling that these communities have had to look across the Pacific to scientists in another country for someone to take this issue seriously and while I would like to thank Dr. Harada for his work, I am left wondering if such a lax approach would have taken place on the part of both levels of government if the affected had been someone other than members of northern First Nations,” Campbell said.

Read more: http://www.kenoradailyminerandnews.com/ArticleDisplay.aspx?e=3585876

by NationTalk on June 15, 2012519 Views

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First Nations lost and forgotten in War of 1812‎ – StarPhoenix

First Nations lost and forgotten in War of 1812

BY DOUG CUTHAND, SPECIAL TO THE STARPHEONIX JUNE 15, 2012

By most accounts, it was a stupid war.

The British were stopping and harassing American ships on the high seas, and the Americans retaliated by going after Canada because it was closer than Britain. The War of 1812 was fought to a draw with no winners, only losers.

Neither of the two combatants won anything in the end. The Americans didn’t win a square inch of land and their White House was burned. The British didn’t want to waste too much of their war machine in North America because they had their hands full with Napoleon.

Modern historical revisionists such as the Stephen Harper conservatives like to point to the War of 1812 as the birth of a nation. But Canada then had a population only of about 300,000, many of whom were conquered French Habitants or American and British settlers.

Read more: http://www.thestarphoenix.com/life/First+Nations+lost+forgotten+1812/6785827/story.html#ixzz1xtK1XJx1

by NationTalk on June 15, 2012706 Views

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Ontario and Webequie sign Ring of Fire agreement – Wawatay News

Ontario and Webequie sign Ring of Fire agreement

Shawn Bell – Wawatay News
Friday June 15, 2012

Ontario and Webequie First Nation have agreed to work together on realizing benefits from the Ring of Fire.

Webequie Chief Cornelius Wabasse and Minister of Northern Development and Mines (MNDM) Rick Bartolucci signed a Memorandum of Cooperation (MOC) during Bartolucci’s visit to Webequie on June 12.

The agreement commits Ontario to providing social, community and economic development supports for Webequie to help facilitate the community’s involvement in the Ring of Fire.

Read more: http://wawataynews.ca/archive/all/2012/6/15/ontario-and-webequie-sign-ring-fire-agreement_22970

by NationTalk on June 15, 2012501 Views

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Children learn songs, stories with bone game‎ – Merritt Herald

Children learn songs, stories with bone game

By Phillip Woolgar – Merritt Herald
Published: June 15, 2012

A high-stakes bone game can cost a person their life savings and, heck, it can also make them a fortune.

But today, Lahal isn’t played to the above-$100,000 bets once seen, and it isn’t very common in the Nicola Valley.

“I know they play a game once a year in Douglas Lake,” said Merritt resident Willard Wallace, who is scheduled to teach the game to children at the Conayt Friendship Society on Aboriginal Day (Thursday). “There’s also a game in Enderby, but it isn’t really played much here.”

He said some games are played in Kelowna and at Alkali Lake where up to $10,000 is wagered.

Read more: http://www.merrittherald.com/lifestyles/159200815.html

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Wachiay Friendship Centre celebrates National Aboriginal Day – Canada.com

Wachiay Friendship Centre celebrates National Aboriginal Day

COMOX VALLEY ECHO JUNE 15, 2012

The Wachiay Friendship Centre will be celebrating National Aboriginal Day by hosting an open house on Thursday, June 21 from 12: 00 noon-1: 30pm. A salmon lunch will be provided.

“We invite all to this day of celebration”, says Wachiay Board President Cora Beddows.

Wachiay has been in operation since August 1995, serving the off-reserve/ urban Aboriginal population of the Comox Valley. Operations/ services have grown over the years, to where we provide services to everyone in the Comox Valley.

Programs currently offered include: Homeless Outreach, Advocacy, FASD Youth Legacy, FASD Keyworker, Elder Support, Roots, Women in Business, and Health Partnerships.

Read more: http://www.canada.com/Wachiay+Friendship+Centre+celebrates+National+Aboriginal/6786430/story.html

by NationTalk on June 15, 2012483 Views

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Education in north ‘watered down:’ ex-student‎ – Winnipeg Free Press

Education in north ‘watered down:’ ex-student

By: Nick Martin

NORTHERN high school students get a “watered-down” and “babied” curriculum compared to students in the city, says Matthew Cook-Contois.

And he should know what a lot of schools are like.

The member of Misipawistik Cree Nation attended Strathcona, St. John’s High School and Maples Collegiate in Winnipeg, as well as schools in Grand Rapids, Norway House and Crane River — sometimes returning to some of those schools two or more times, as his family moved around.

On Thursday, he told a national conference of aboriginal school trustees it was in city schools he saw the curriculum appropriate to his grade.

“Up north, we were given a watered-down curriculum. It was a bit babied,” Cook-Contois said. “I was going to Grade 11, but I didn’t feel like I was going to Grade 11.”

Read more: http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/local/education-in-north-watered-down-ex-student-159161635.html

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Northern First Nations leading way for Ontario: Stan Beardy‎ – Wawatay News

Northern First Nations leading way for Ontario: Stan Beardy

Thursday June 14, 2012
Shawn Bell – Wawatay News

The issues and opportunities facing communities in northern Ontario should guide all Ontario First Nations over the coming years, says Ontario regional chief candidate Stan Beardy.

Beardy, the current Nishnawbe Aski Nation (NAN) grand chief, says that his perspective being from the North gives him a good understanding of how First Nations across the province can use northern examples and initiatives as a way forward.

“When you look at today’s scenarios in terms of economics, the NAN territory and northern Ontario in general is where the greatest opportunities are in terms of resource extraction,” Beardy says. “At the same time you talk about the lack of budgets, social services cutbacks and the lack of capital infrastructure, we’re the ones with the biggest challenges.”

Read more: http://www.wawataynews.ca/archive/all/2012/6/14/northern-first-nations-leading-way-ontario-stan-beardy_22946

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First Nations Report‎ – Planet S

First Nations Report

Published Thursday June 14

THERE’S NOT MUCH BOOM FOR ABORIGINAL PEOPLE

Truth Will Out

THE HEALING PROCESS HAS ONLY JUST BEGUN

It’s a national shame — and we haven’t even begun to make reparations.

Starting over 140 years ago, aboriginal people in this country were forced into residential schools — funded by a Canadian government which believed they were responsible for the education and development of Canada’s aboriginal people. That “education” was in fact “aggressive assimilation,” where English, Christian, and Canadian customs would be passed on — forcibly erasing native traditions in the process.

Attendance was mandatory, and during this era, more than 150,000 First Nations, Metis and Inuit children were placed in these schools, against their parents’ will. Most were physically abused, many were sexually abused — and all were psychologically scarred.

Read more: http://www.planetsmag.com/story.php?id=870

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Peter Foster: Pipelines behind C-38 battle – National Post

Peter Foster: Pipelines behind C-38 battle

Peter Foster Jun 14, 2012

Harper right to streamline ­pipeline regulations

Although this week’s amendment-packed “slumber party” to hold up passage of omnibus Bill C-38 focused on Stephen Harper’s alleged contempt for Parliament, perhaps the most contentious element of a contentious bill related to the streamlining of environmental regulation for new resource infrastructure, in particular pipelines.

This reflects the fact that the petroleum industry is more politicized now than at any time since the 1980 National Energy Program. Then, the issue was a fight between Pierre Trudeau’s Ottawa and Peter Lougheed’s Alberta over the spoils of higher oil and gas prices. Now, it is a struggle between the Harper government’s aspirations to facilitate and enhance Canada’s status as a petroleum superpower, and an environmental movement that wants to kill the fossil-fuel industry. Meanwhile, old-style interprovincial jealousies have also been stoked by NDP leader Thomas Mulcair’s invoking “Dutch disease:” the suggestion that an oil-boosted Canadian dollar is costing manufacturing jobs.

Read more: http://opinion.financialpost.com/2012/06/14/peter-foster-pipelines-behind-c-38-battle/

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Missing Thunder Bay teen found safe – Wawatay News

Missing Thunder Bay teen found safe

Friday June 15, 2012
Shawn Bell – Wawatay News

Chris Kwandibens, a 16-year-old male from Thunder Bay who had been missing since June 4, has been found.

In a release issued June 15, Thunder Bay police say Kwandibens was found safe.

Police thanked the public for their support in finding Kwandibens.

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“Calls from the north sometimes have a very distinctive sound” – kidshelpphone.ca

“Calls from the north sometimes have a very distinctive sound”

In Focus
June 2012

In remote areas of Canada, including First Nations communities, Kids Help Phone is often the only professional counselling service available for youth who need free, anonymous, confidential support.

Access to counselling is a challenge for many youth, especially those who live on reserves and other small communities where talking to a local social worker, nurse, doctor, or other adult may not offer the promise of confidentiality and anonymity of Kids Help Phone.

In 2010, Kids Help Phone committed to deepen its understanding of the feelings and issues Aboriginal youth struggle with in order to better serve them on an individual level.

Read more: http://events.kidshelpphone.ca/2011_infocus/12-06-callsFromTheNorth.html

by NationTalk on June 15, 2012496 Views

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Federal documents reveal clash between Enbridge, DFO – Ottawa Citizen

Federal documents reveal clash between Enbridge, DFO

By Peter O’Neil and Mike De Souza, Postmedia June 15, 2012

OTTAWA — Federal fisheries officials were having “troubling” disagreements with Enbridge Inc. over the company’s interpretation of its responsibility to protect fish habitat along the Northern Gateway oilsands pipeline route before the company submitted its project proposal in 2010, according to internal documents.

Enbridge was concluding some of the crossings, over an estimated 1,000 waterways, were low risk when fisheries biologists felt the same were medium or high risk to fish and fish habitat, according to emails obtained through the Access to Information Act.

“There is not much movement (by Enbridge) for avoidance of sensitive areas,” said one biologist at a February, 2010 meeting, according to a record of that gathering of four officials with the Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO).

Read more: http://www.ottawacitizen.com/Federal+documents+reveal+clash+between+Enbridge/6788052/story.html#ixzz1xsROYwvy

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Federal budget 2012: Highlights of legislative changes in Bill C-38 – Toronto Star

Federal budget 2012: Highlights of legislative changes in Bill C-38

Published On Thu Jun 14 2012

Joanna Smith
Ottawa Bureau

Environmental assessment

The bill will reduce the number of environmental assessments performed by the federal government, leaving most of them to provincial oversight bodies, and will ensure reviews are finished within two years. Cabinet will have the power to override National Energy Board decisions on big development projects like the Northern Gateway pipeline in B.C.

Climate change

The Conservative government has already pulled out of the Kyoto — the only binding climate change treaty in the world — but repealing the Kyoto Protocol Implementation Act means no more annual reports or independent reviews on how Canada is faring in its efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

Fisheries

Changes to the Fisheries Act would narrow the protection of fish habitats to commercial, recreational or Aboriginal fisheries in major bodies of water and change the definition of “serious harm” to include only the death of fish or “permanent” changes to or destruction of those habitats.

Read more: http://www.thestar.com/news/canada/politics/article/1211684–federal-budget-2012-highlights-of-legislative-changes-in-bill-c-38

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Sacred first nations artifact finds its way back home – Vancouver Sun

Sacred first nations artifact finds its way back home

Rock engraved with images of wildlife returned to B.C.’s Interior community

BY MANORI RAVINDRAN, VANCOUVER SUN JUNE 14, 2012

A six-tonne boulder covered in aboriginal engravings is finally being returned to the B.C. Interior, bringing closure to a first nations community whose territory it was taken from nearly 90 years ago.

“It was taken during a time when we didn’t have a say and we had no rights, but now times are changing and we can help undo the wrongs of the past,” said Phyllis Webstad, a member of the Stswecem’c Xgat’tem First Nation, who is coordinating the repatriation. “It’s healing for us.”

The petroglyph-covered rock, which is carved with images of serpents, deer and elk, was uncovered along the Fraser River by a gold prospector in 1925, and moved to Vancouver’s Stanley Park a year later. The boulder, which is 1.5 metres (five feet) long and 1.2 metres (four feet) wide, was dragged 914 metres from the river by a team of 10 horses and, after an eight-week journey to Vancouver was placed near the park’s totem poles.

Read more: http://www.vancouversun.com/travel/Sacred+first+nations+artifact+finds+back+home/6785074/story.html

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Native charter schools eyed – Winnipeg Free Press

Native charter schools eyed

Experts seek ways to improve education

By: Alexandra Paul

A national conference on aboriginal education, opening in Calgary today, is looking at the experience of overseas schools for clues to boost Canada’s poor education rates on reserves.

The Frontier Centre for Public Policy, a Prairie-based think-tank, is bringing together experts from Hawaii and Canada’s only indigenous charter school near Edmonton, among others, to look at opening more charter schools.

For Manitoba, the conference, Expanding Choices in Aboriginal Education, offers a key to flip a poor education system into a great one, said commissioner James Wilson of the Treaty Relations Commission of Manitoba, who is opening the conference.

“What the research around the world is showing more and more is that you have to have exceptionally high expectations. And you have to recognize the culture and language of the students. Those three things combined end up increasing literacy and (science skills) among indigenous students,” Wilson said Thursday.

Read more: http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/local/native-charter-schools-eyed-159161735.html

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Musqueam band to buy back Marpole land – The Province

Musqueam band to buy back Marpole land

Provincial government promises $5 million toward purchase of historic midden

BY SUZANNE FOURNIER, THE PROVINCE JUNE 15, 2012

The provincial government will give the Musqueam band almost $5 million to buy back their precious Marpole midden.

The South Vancouver historic site is currently slated for development

“We’re obviously pleased. We’ll be meeting with the developer and there will be discussions about suit-able compensation,” said Musqueam leader Cecelia Point.

Musqueam band members began occupying the site, near the Arthur Laing bridge in Marpole, when an archaeologist hired by the developer turned up human remains. The midden has produced priceless artifacts as well as human remains in the past, and is believed to be at least 4,500 years old.

Read more: http://www.theprovince.com/technology/Musqueam+band+back+Marpole+land/6786870/story.html#ixzz1xs3iTerg

by NationTalk on June 15, 2012727 Views

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Why conservationists should support Bill C-38 – Vancouver Sun

Why conservationists should support Bill C-38

By John Weston, Special to the Sun June 14, 2012

I’d like to address some misinformation that has been circulating about Bill C-38, the Budget Implementation Act, and explain why conservationists, along with Conservatives, should support this legislation.

Our government has made clear the advantages the passage of Bill C-38 will provide to the Canadian economy. By streamlining regulatory reviews for major projects, we can, and will, maintain the same rigorous environmental protection that Canadians rightly expect. As Prime Minister Stephen Harper has stated: “When it comes to evaluating development plans, one should not confuse the length of the process with the rigour of the science.” In other words, more assessments do not equate to better assessments.

The proposed changes streamline regulatory process, eliminating duplication and overlap, and setting a specified, generous period (two years) for completing the necessary assessments. These changes will stimulate the economy and create jobs, two things the Conservative government has consistently done while other countries fail around us. Ask any of the 750,000 Canadians who have found jobs since July 2009; they will tell you how important it is to continue this momentum.

Read more: http://www.vancouversun.com/business/conservationists+should+support+Bill/6784277/story.html#ixzz1xpabSQ7G

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NAHO website sets sights on curbing bullying among aboriginal youth – Nunatsiaq News

NAHO website sets sights on curbing bullying among aboriginal youth

Bullying a “major problem among Aboriginal youth in Canada”

June 14, 2012
DAVID MURPHY

A National Aboriginal Health Organization website is calling bullying a “major problem among aboriginal youth in Canada” and aims to wipe out “lateral violence” when the “oppressed become the oppressors” in aboriginal communities.

The website was created to provide information for aboriginal people to halt bullying among themselves, something NAHO says many recognize as a major issue for First Nations, Inuit and Métis across Canada.

“Bullying among aboriginal people is a form of lateral violence and has caused a rift among our peoples which we can see coming out in our children’s behavior,” said NAHO’s acting CEO Simon Brascoupé in a June 13 news release.

Read more: http://www.nunatsiaqonline.ca/stories/article/65674naho_website_sets_sights_on_curbing_bullying_among_aboriginal_youth/

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DFO, Enbridge disagreed over fish protection along pipeline route … – Vancouver Sun

DFO, Enbridge disagreed over fish protection along pipeline route: documents

By PETER O’NEIL and MIKE DE SOUZA, Vancouver Sun and Postmedia News June 14, 2012

OTTAWA — Federal fisheries officials were having “troubling” disagreements with Enbridge Inc. over the company’s interpretation of its responsibility to protect fish habitat along the Northern Gateway oilsands pipeline route before the company submitted its project proposal in 2010, according to internal documents.

Enbridge was concluding some of the crossings, over an estimated 1,000 waterways, were low risk when fisheries biologists felt the same were medium or high risk to fish and fish habitat, according to emails obtained through the Access to Information Act.

“There is not much movement (by Enbridge) for avoidance of sensitive areas,” said one biologist at a February, 2010 meeting, according to a record of that gathering of four officials with the Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO).

Read more: http://www.edmontonjournal.com/Fisheries+department+Enbridge+disagreed+over+fish+protection+along+pipeline+route+internal+documents/6783791/story.html#ixzz1xpZluL7B

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Aboriginal chronic disease clinic opens in Thunder Bay – Wawatay News

Aboriginal chronic disease clinic opens in Thunder Bay

Thursday June 14, 2012
Rick Garrick

Clients appreciate the time and care they are receiving at the new Anishnawbe Mushkiki Nurse Practitioner-Led Clinic in Thunder Bay.

“They love it; they’re happy,” said Deborah McGoldrick, nurse practitioner clinic lead at the new clinic. “We work differently. We have a little bit more time to spend with people and they appreciate that. And because it’s chronic disease management, you can’t do appointments in five, 10, 15 minutes.”

McGoldrick said the clinic has already helped a number of patients who had uncontrolled diabetes.

Read more: http://www.wawataynews.ca/archive/all/2012/6/14/aboriginal-chronic-disease-clinic-opens-thunder-bay_22959

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Musqueam offered $4.8 million to buy Marpole midden site – The Province

Musqueam offered $4.8 million to buy Marpole midden site

By Suzanne Fournier, The Province June 14, 2012

The Musqueam are “still keeping a vigil” at the Marpole midden site but hopes are rising for a peaceful solution through government cash to save their ancestors.

The B.C. government has finally issued a letter promising cash to help “expedite” a deal between the Musqueam and a would-be condo developer.

Only $4.8 million has been offered so far but other cash compensations will also be paid by the B.C. government to the Musqueam.

The Province has obtained a copy of the June 13 letter from B.C. Aboriginal Relations and Reconciliation Minister Mary Polak to Musqueam Chief Ernie Campbell, offering cash instead of a land swap so the band can compensate the owner or developer.

Read more: http://www.theprovince.com/news/Musqueam+offered+million+Marpole+midden+site/6784002/story.html#ixzz1xpZCEvyN

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MPs finally end 24-hour voting marathon on Conservative budget bill – 680 News

MPs finally end 24-hour voting marathon on Conservative budget bill

The Canadian Press Jun 14, 2012

OTTAWA – Members of Parliament completed a marathon voting session Thursday night on the Conservative government’s budget bill, voting on hundreds of amendments in an exercise that lasted nearly 24 hours.

The voting, which began at 1 a.m. Thursday morning, ran non-stop until just after 11 p.m. when the bill finally passed.
Huge cheers from his caucus greeted NDP Tom Mulcair as he rose to vote on the final amendment.

Prime Minister Stephen Harper received an even more rapturous applause when he led the Conservative votes against.

Red more: http://www.680news.com/news/national/article/373125–mps-finally-end-24-hour-voting-marathon-on-conservative-budget-bill

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Building bridges with first nations works for all – Vancouver Sun

Building bridges with first nations works for all

BY ELLIS ROSS, SPECIAL TO THE SUN JUNE 14, 2012 5:09 PM

In a CBC interview May 30, B.C. Conservative party leader John Cummins confirmed that if he is elected premier the province would take the position that aboriginal title has been extinguished.

This type of thinking belongs to a long-gone age. In 1887, premier William Smithe commented that before the white man arrived aboriginals were “little better than wild animals that rove over the hills” and rejected the idea that B.C.’s aboriginal people had aboriginal title.

Not only does Cummins have a shallow understanding of case law, his statement contradicts Canada’s Constitution, which recognizes and affirms the rights of aboriginal nations. In fact, the Supreme Court of Canada ruled unanimously that “since aboriginal title was a common law right whose existence was recognized well before 1982 … s. 35(1) has constitutionalized it in its full form.” In other words, our title was never extinguished.

Read more: http://www.vancouversun.com/news/Building+bridges+with+first+nations+works/6784265/story.html#ixzz1xpYB2Pi1

by NationTalk on June 15, 2012567 Views

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Moose Jaw to host first powwow since ’90s – Regina Leader-Post

Moose Jaw to host first powwow since ‘90s

By Kerry Benjoe, Leader-Post June 14, 2012

REGINA — Powwows are a time to celebrate and that’s what the organizers of the WACA Traditional Powwow in Moose Jaw are preparing for this weekend.

“We just want to make everyone welcome and (participate in) one of our First Nations traditions,” said Isabelle Hanson one of the organizers for the event.

The Wakamow Aboriginal Community Association (WACA) initiated the event to not only mark Aboriginal History Month but to celebrate and honour the youth at Empire Community School in Moose Jaw.

Read more: http://www.leaderpost.com/Moose+host+first+powwow+since/6778542/story.html#ixzz1xnRH7pie

by NationTalk on June 14, 2012601 Views

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