You can use your smart phone to browse stories in the comfort of your hand. Simply browse this site on your smart phone.

    Using an RSS Reader you can access most recent stories and other feeds posted on this network.

    SNetwork Recent Stories

S Mainstream Aboriginal Related News

Press ReleasesText

First Nations Child Welfare Before Federal Court – Postmedia News

First Nations child welfare before Federal Court

POSTMEDIA NEWS FEBRUARY 11, 2012

The federal government is discriminating against First Nations children on reserve by giving them less money for education, health and child-welfare services than their fellow Canadians, aboriginal advocates will argue Monday at a Federal Court hearing.

The government, for its part, contends it’s not a fair question.

But, Cindy Blackstock, executive director for the First Nations Child and Family Caring Society of Canada, said, if the government succeeds with that argument, the case risks turning First Nations communities into zones where human rights protections afforded to Canadians simply don’t apply.

In 2010, the chair of the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal dismissed a human rights complaint against the government from Blackstock’s group and the Assembly of First Nations.

Read more: http://www.canada.com/First+Nations+child+welfare+before+Federal+Court/6138214/story.html

by NationTalk on February 13, 2012387 Views

Read More
Press ReleasesText

Aboriginal School Conditions Dismay Panel – Calgary Herald

Aboriginal school conditions dismay panel

Patchwork system has failed students ‘miserably’

BY DARCY HENTON, CALGARY HERALD FEBRUARY 11, 2012

An independent panel investigating aboriginal education found 100 crumbling schools on reserves across Canada and some in Alberta that failed to even fit the definition of a school, says panel chair Scott Haldane.

One school in Swan River in northern Alberta “was just a bunch of portables in a field.”

“It is not a school you would send your kid to,” said Haldane, the president of YMCA Canada who was selected by the federal minister of Aboriginal Affairs and the National Chief of the Assembly of First Nations, to chair the threemember panel.

Read more: http://www.calgaryherald.com/news/Aboriginal+school+conditions+dismay+panel/6137721/story.html#ixzz1mI3eW1gW

by NationTalk on February 13, 2012500 Views

Read More
Press ReleasesText

Scrapping Indian Act isn’t a workable solution – StarPhoenix

Scrapping Indian Act isn’t a workable solution

BY DOUG CUTHAND, SPECIAL TO THE STARPHEONIX FEBRUARY 10, 2012

At the recent meeting between the prime minister and First Nations leaders, he said there would be no sudden changes to the Indian Act because it would “leave too big of a hole.”

You won’t see me agreeing with Stephen Harper too often, but this time he is correct. To proceed in an orderly way, we need incremental changes to the Indian Act. To simply scrap it would be to leave a sudden void in the Crown’s relationship with First Nations.

The Indian Act is legislation for the administration of Indians. It is there for the government, not for the First Nations.

Read more: http://www.thestarphoenix.com/news/Scrapping+Indian+workable+solution/6130492/story.html#ixzz1m15Fo492

by NationTalk on February 10, 2012492 Views

Read More
Press ReleasesText

Enbridge confident pipeline will be built – Calgary Herald

Enbridge confident pipeline will be built

CEO says firm won’t offer more to natives

By David Ljunggren and Jason Fekete, Reuters; Postmedia News; With Files From The Calgary Herald And Reuters February 10, 2012

Enbridge Inc. will not offer better financial terms to aboriginal bands opposing its major oil pipeline from Alberta to the B.C. coast, the firm’s chief executive said on Thursday.

Pat Daniel also said that although he’s prepared to look at alternate routes for the Northern Gateway pipeline, crucial to Canadian plans to export oil to China, he feels the current routing plan is the best.

He dismissed the suggestion that regulatory delays and potential court action could kill off the pipeline.

Read more: http://www.canada.com/business/Enbridge+confident+pipeline+will+built/6131188/story.html#ixzz1m14zS3cD

by NationTalk on February 10, 2012500 Views

Read More
Press ReleasesText

Aboriginal education gaps can no longer be tolerated – Globe and Mail

Aboriginal education gaps can no longer be tolerated

From Friday’s Globe and Mail
Last updated Friday, Feb. 10, 2012

The gaps in the education system for aboriginal Canadians revealed by a national panel on Thursday are something no Canadian should have to put up with. That panel, set up by the Harper government and the Assembly of First Nations, has produced sensible recommendations for building an effective system. Continued leadership from Prime Minister Stephen Harper and Aboriginal Affairs Minister John Duncan is needed to put that system in place, but native chiefs, too, need to lead, and a good number of them boycotted the panel.

After visiting 25 First Nations schools, the panel described the gaps as startling. No regular reporting on a child’s educational attainment. Inadequate or non-existent early literacy and numeracy programs, and no clear literacy programs to help children who fall behind. No functioning system for the assessment and support of special needs. Schools in substandard, unsafe physical condition, without plans to fix. No consistent practice around teacher certification, discipline or regulation, around monitoring of children’s attendance, around ensuring school is safe for children.

Read more: http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/opinions/editorials/aboriginal-education-gaps-can-no-longer-be-tolerated/article2333517/

by NationTalk on February 10, 2012529 Views

Read More
Press ReleasesText

RCMP honour band constable for bravery – CBC News

RCMP honour band constable for bravery

CBC News Posted: Feb 10, 2012

A First Nations band constable has been honoured for his bravery in rescuing a two-year-old girl from a house fire in Manitoba.

There were six children, aged two months to 13 years, asleep in the home on the remote St. Theresa Point First Nation in January 2011.

Four children escaped the fire, while two others were pulled out. One of those, a two-month-old girl later died. (RCMP)
Four children were able to escape, but a two-month-old and two-year-old girl were still inside when band Const. Timothy Mason arrived just after noon.

Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/manitoba/story/2012/02/10/mb-band-constable-bravery-manitoba.html

by NationTalk on February 10, 2012457 Views

Read More
Press ReleasesText

First Nations Look to Sue Governments Over Flood – CBC News

First Nations look to sue governments over flood

CBC News Posted: Feb 10, 2012

Some First Nations flood evacuees hope to sue multiple levels of government over the handling of the 2011 flood disaster.

Kurvis Anderson, forced last spring from his home in Pinaymootang First Nation (Fairford), claims that authorities are accountable for the psychological stress the evacuations caused, especially on Lake Manitoba.

“We’re doing this because this flood in our area wasn’t an accident,” he said. “(It) wasn’t a natural disaster. It was done on purpose. That’s how we feel. It was done on purpose like we were sacrificed to save Winnipeg.”

Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/manitoba/story/2012/02/09/mb-flood-lawsuit-first-nations.html

by NationTalk on February 10, 2012555 Views

Read More
Press ReleasesText

Constance Lake hydro project raises concerns downriver – Wawatay News

Constance Lake hydro project raises concerns downriver

Friday February 10, 2012
Rick Garrick — Wawatay News

First Nations downriver from four proposed Northland Power Inc.-Constance Lake hydro projects on a tributary of the Albany River are raising concerns about potential impacts.

“They have to involve us,” said Kashechewan Chief Jonathan Solomon. “We’re downstream here — we’re already feeling the consequences of past projects that have happened in our tributaries. No matter how small those rivers may be, that water goes towards the Albany River.”

Solomon said past projects on tributaries of the Albany River have impacted the river and his community, noting water has been diverted from the Albany River system to power hydro-electric generating stations on Lac Seul and upstream and downstream of Lake Nipigon.

Read more: http://www.wawataynews.ca/archive/all/2012/2/10/constance-lake-hydro-project-raises-concerns-downriver_22393

by NationTalk on February 10, 2012474 Views

Read More
Press ReleasesText

Saganash to Drop Out of NDP Leadership Race – Nunatsiaq Online

Saganash pulls out of NDP leadership race

“I received a lot of support, but the money didn’t follow”

February 10, 2012

Nunavik MP Romeo Saganash has officially withdrawn from the race to lead the federal New Democratic Party, citing illness and a lack of funds.

Saganash made the announcement in Val d’Or the morning of Feb. 10, speaking to local media with a hoarse voice from the second bout of bronchitis the Cree leader has suffered since he launched his leadership bid last September.

“After thousands of kilometres of travel and two bouts of bronchitis, my campaign for the leadership of the NDP has come to an end,” Saganash said Feb. 10.

Read more: http://www.nunatsiaqonline.ca/stories/article/65674saganash_to_drop_out_of_ndp_leadership_race/

by NationTalk on February 10, 2012391 Views

Read More
Press ReleasesText

Native Art Show a Stunning Display – Edmonton Journal

Native art show a stunning display

Contemporary work by aboriginal artists addresses past, present

BY JANICE RYAN, FREELANCE FEBRUARY 10, 2012

As I rounded the corner leading to the “Narrative Quest” exhibition in the Royal Alberta Museum, I was met with a “wow” factor that sent an agreeable ripple of pleasure to my core.

Canvases pulsing with eye-pop-ping colour danced off deep, thunderstorm-grey walls. Silky-smooth stone carvings sat atop crisp white plinths. The soulful, meditative lull of the Native American flute filled the air. It was an embracing welcome, indeed.

With just one foot in the gallery, I laid eyes on a handful of internationally acclaimed, award-winning aboriginal artists – Alex Janvier, Joane Cardinal-Schubert, Jane Ash Poitras, Dale Auger.

Read more: http://www.edmontonjournal.com/Native+show+stunning+display/6131521/story.html

by NationTalk on February 10, 2012441 Views

Read More
Press ReleasesText

Celebrating Aboriginal Storytellers – Estevan Lifestyles

Celebrating Aboriginal storytellers

FEBRUARY 10, 2012

The Estevan Public Library launched Aboriginal Storytelling Month on February 6 with a visit from motivational speaker and storyteller Vera Tourangeau.

Tourangeau encouraged students who were in attendance to follow their dreams and to never give up, regardless of what challenges they face in life. At one time, she was living her dream: to become a teacher. She also worked as a school administrator before she became a storyteller and a speaker in 2005.

Her speaking engagements have taken her across Canada. Tourangeau has spoken in Canada’s Parliament and at the Senate, and in Washington, D.C. She recently started speaking to school students.

Read more: http://www.sasklifestyles.com/article/20120210/ESTLIFESTYLES0501/120209918/-1/estlifestyles/celebrating-aboriginal-storytellers

by NationTalk on February 10, 2012595 Views

Read More
Press ReleasesText

Survey of contemporary native art both powerful and beautiful‎ – Edmonton Journal

Survey of contemporary native art both powerful and beautiful

BY JANICE RYAN, EDMONTONJOURNAL.COM FEBRUARY 9, 2012

Visual arts preview

Narrative Quest

Where: Royal Alberta Museum, 12845 102nd Ave.; half-price admission Saturday and Sunday, 9 to 11 a.m.

When: Until April 29

More info: royalalbertmuseum.ca or 780-453-9100; hermis.alberta.ca/afa/; affta.ab.ca

As I rounded the corner leading to the Narrative Quest exhibition in the Royal Alberta Museum, I was met with a “wow” factor that sent an agreeable ripple of pleasure to my core.

Canvases pulsing with eye-popping colour danced off deep, thunderstorm-grey walls. Silky-smooth stone carvings sat atop crisp, white plinths. The soulful, meditative lull of the Native American flute filled the air. It was an embracing welcome, indeed.

Read more: http://www.edmontonjournal.com/entertainment/Survey+contemporary+native+both+powerful+beautiful/6126565/story.html

by NationTalk on February 9, 2012553 Views

Read More
Press ReleasesText

First nations schools in desperate need of funding and accountability, panel finds – Globe and Mail

First nations schools in desperate need of funding and accountability, panel finds

TAMARA BALUJA AND KATE HAMMER
OTTAWA AND VANCOUVER— From Thursday’s Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, Feb. 08, 2012

A federally appointed panel says Canada is in desperate need for increased funding and accountability for first nations schools in order to combat soaring high-school drop-out rates among aboriginal youth.

It recommends new legislation, a First Nations Education Act, that would help accomplish these goals by replacing the current patchwork of programs and initiatives.

“There is no first nations education system that consistently supports and delivers positive outcomes for first nations students in Canada,” said the panel’s chair, Scott Haldane, after releasing the report Wednesday.

Read more: http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/politics/first-nations-schools-in-desperate-need-of-funding-and-accountability-panel-finds/article2331236/

by NationTalk on February 9, 20121087 Views

Read More
Press ReleasesText

First Nations Populations Soar – Winnipeg Free Press

First Nations populations soar

Province’s remote communities lead way

By: Mary Agnes Welch
Posted: 02/9/2012

MOST of the Top 10 fastest-growing communities in Manitoba are First Nations, especially remote ones.

Fox Lake, the tiny community on the Nelson River near Gillam, nearly doubled in size over five years. It started small, with just over 100 people. Now it has nearly 200.

That mini-boom could be a harbinger of things to come. Fox Lake was among four First Nations to sign a deal with Manitoba Hydro to build the Keeyask dam over the coming decade, securing jobs and revenue.

And, while Canada debates the viability of remote reserves, Barren Lands First Nation, one of the most northerly and isolated bands in Manitoba, posted a 78 per cent population increase.

Read more: http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/local/first-nations-populations-soar-138997199.html

by NationTalk on February 9, 2012542 Views

Read More
Press ReleasesText

Enbridge Won’t Offer First Nations Better Terms – Reuters

Enbridge won’t offer first nations better terms

By David Ljunggren, Reuters February 9, 2012

BEIJING – Canada’s Enbridge Inc. will not offer better financial terms to aboriginal bands standing in the way of a major oil pipeline from energy-rich Alberta to the Pacific Coast, the firm’s chief executive officer said on Thursday.

Pat Daniel also told Reuters that while he was prepared to look at alternate routes for the Northern Gateway pipeline — which is crucial to Canadian plans to export oil to China — he felt the current routing plan was the best.

The C$5.5 billion ($5.4 billion) Northern Gateway would run 1,177 km (731 miles) from oil-rich Alberta across the Rocky Mountains to Kitimat on British Columbia’s Pacific Coast. At Kitimat, the oil would be loaded on supertankers and shipped to the Pacific.

Read more: http://www.vancouversun.com/Enbridge+offer+first+nations+better+terms/6123915/story.html#ixzz1luKSBwMJ

by NationTalk on February 9, 2012420 Views

Read More
Press ReleasesText

National Panel Urges Action on First Nations Education – Winnipeg Free Press

National panel urges action on First Nations education

By: Mia Rabson
Posted: 02/9/2012

OTTAWA — It would be morally and fiscally irresponsible to ignore the “startling gaps” facing First Nations students, says a national panel that is calling for a First Nations education act within 18 months.

The act would set standards, govern operations and ensure sustainable funding is in place so First Nations kids have the same chance at a quality education as every other child in Canada.

“Children aren’t failing, it’s the system that is failing them,” panel member George Lafond said Wednesday.

The panel was appointed by Aboriginal Affairs Minister John Duncan and Assembly of First Nations National Chief Shawn Atleo.

Read more: http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/local/national-panel-urges-action-on-first-nations-education-138997239.html

by NationTalk on February 9, 2012534 Views

Read More
Press ReleasesText

Wabano Launches Ambitious Campaign – Ottawa East EMC

Wabano launches ambitious campaign

Posted Feb 9, 2012 By Michelle Nash

EMC community – The Wabano Centre for Aboriginal Health has launched a campaign blitz to sell 2,000 tiles for the floor of their new centre in an effort to raise $400,000 for the construction of their new Mamawi Centre.

The Wabano Centre is in the middle of their $9.6 million fundraising campaign to expand their health services and build the first-ever national centre of excellence in Aboriginal health.

Part of their fundraising effort has been to sell tiles in a star design on the floor of their cultural gathering space in the Mamawi Centre, currently under construction on Montreal Road.

Read more: http://www.emcottawaeast.ca/20120209/news/Wabano+launches+ambitious+campaign

by NationTalk on February 9, 2012410 Views

Read More
Press ReleasesText

Dismantle reserves and integrate First Nations‎ – Canada.com

Dismantle reserves and integrate First Nations

BY J.V. SEYMOUR, THE DAILY NEWS FEBRUARY 8, 2012

The time has come to abolish native reserves and integrate, once and for all, our aboriginal brothers and sisters into society.

Every time a government or company announces a project to be built, so-called native leaders, with nothing to contribute but demands, want money.

Enough. No.

Can the 99% of us make it any clearer?

Read more: http://www.canada.com/Dismantle+reserves+integrate+First+Nations/6118547/story.html

by NationTalk on February 8, 2012749 Views

Read More
Press ReleasesText

Resolving Canada’s ‘Indian problem’‎ – Standard Freeholder

Resolving Canada’s ‘Indian problem’

Guest column
By Doug George-Kanentiio

Prime Minister Stephen Harper deserves credit for meeting with aboriginal leaders on Jan. 24 to discuss ways to resolve the many challenges which confront Canada’s native peoples.

The meeting was characterized by an acknowledgment from the Prime Minister that changes are needed in the current status of the country’s First Nations which comes as no surprise to those who have lived under the heavy hand of the 1876 Indian Act.

Change has to begin by recognizing that without the contributions of the First Nations there would be no Canada, either in name or national status.

Read more: http://www.standard-freeholder.com/ArticleDisplay.aspx?e=3463989

by NationTalk on February 8, 2012508 Views

Read More
Press ReleasesText

COVER STORY: A First Nations First‎ – North Shore Outlook

A First Nations First

By Todd Coyne – North Shore Outlook
Published: February 08, 2012

Snowboarding is a lifestyle for some. For members of the province’s newest high-performance team, it’s a suitably high-performance one.

That means no drugs, no alcohol, a healthy diet and staying in good standing in the community, explains Lindsay Hubley, co-founder of the First Nations Snowboard Team’s first all-girl competition squad.

Hubley and fellow First Nations rider Virginia Johnston founded the high-performance team for young Squamish women on the North Shore just months ago and already the response has been overwhelming.

Read more: http://www.northshoreoutlook.com/news/138958559.html

by NationTalk on February 8, 2012491 Views

Read More
Press ReleasesText

Ottawa must build First Nations education system, national panel finds – Toronto Star

Ottawa must build First Nations education system, national panel finds

By Tanya Talaga
Queen’s Park Bureau

A national panel has created a blueprint on how to build a First Nations education system from the ground up, shows a new report obtained by the Star.

The three-person panel, tasked with reporting to Aboriginal Affairs Minister John Duncan and Shawn Atleo, the national chief of the Assembly of First Nations, says Canada must create a First Nations education system that is culturally sensitive and complete with regional school boards, teacher and student standards.

The report, being released at 5 p.m. Wednesday, has five key recommendations all with detailed descriptions on how to achieve change. One calls for reserve schools — the responsibility of the federal government — to get an immediate on-par funding boost by an amount equal to the percentage increase in 2012 for provincial schools in the province in which the aboriginal school is located.

Read more: http://www.thestar.com/news/article/1128158

by NationTalk on February 8, 2012572 Views

Read More
Press ReleasesText

Panel calls for First Nations Education Act – Toronto Sun

Panel calls for First Nations Education Act 2

BY KRISTY KIRKUP, PARLIAMENTARY BUREAU
FIRST POSTED: WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 08, 2012

A highly anticipated blueprint on First Nations education is calling for specific measures, including a First Nation Education Act, to improve outcomes for children on reserves.

A national panel, which was jointly commissioned by the Assembly of First Nations and the government, issued a report Wednesday containing five recommendations for reform. The recommendations include drafting new legislation and establishing a national commission on reserve education.

The three-member panel was mandated to evaluate options to improve elementary and secondary education outcomes for First Nations children.

Read more: http://www.torontosun.com/2012/02/08/panel-calls-for-first-nation-education-act

by NationTalk on February 8, 2012556 Views

Read More
Press ReleasesText

Speaker says NAN youth are losing their history – TbNewsWatch.com

Speaker says NAN youth are losing their history

By Jeff Labine, tbnewswatch.com

Daniel Sakchekapo says Nishnawbe Aski Nation youth are losing their history.

Sakchekapo spoke to a group of more than 20 Aboriginal youth at the annual Oshkaatisak Niigaan Oji gathering at the Nor’Wester Hotel on Wednesday.

The three-day conference, which started on Tuesday, had youth from various First Nation communities across Northwestern Ontario.

Sakchekapo talked about the intergenerational abuse that has happened to the Nishnawbe Aski Nation people. He began with a video he did for the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada and how the residential school impacted his life.

Read more: http://www.tbnewswatch.com/entertainment/188159/Speaker-says-NAN-youth-are-losing-their-history

by NationTalk on February 8, 2012769 Views

Read More
Press ReleasesText

Cooper: Judging land claims on facts, not modern fantasies – Calgary Herald

Cooper: Judging land claims on facts, not modern fantasies

By Barry Cooper February 7, 2012

The Yukon Supreme Court is not a forum to which southern Canadian lawyers, judges and advocates for aboriginal rights usually look to for guidance. And yet, on the last day of January, Justice Leigh F. Gower handed down a judgment that brought, for the first time in many years, a measure of common sense to the inflated claims of lawyers acting on behalf of their aboriginal clients.

Even more amazing, he did so by accepting the historical evidence introduced by an expert witness as to what the relevant proclamations, ordinances and laws actually meant when they were passed. Having written reports for both the Crown and their opponents on a few very interesting cases, I can affirm that it is often difficult to get your own side’s lawyers, let alone the judge, to see the point of your alleged expertise.

This case involved the claim of the Ross River Indian Band, who live in an area rich in mineral resources, that the courts can compel the government of Canada to fulfil what they take to be binding obligations to compensate the band. As with most so-called land claims litigation, it was all about money.

Read more: http://www.calgaryherald.com/news/Cooper+Judging+land+claims+facts+modern+fantasies/6116303/story.html#ixzz1lpYI1gKT

by NationTalk on February 8, 2012413 Views

Read More
Press ReleasesText

Cat Lake First Nation declares state of emergency – The Argus

Cat Lake First Nation declares state of emergency

February 7, 2012
Sebastian Murdoch-Gibson
News Writer

Citing grave concerns about substance abuse in the community, Cat Lake First Nation issued a state of emergency on Jan. 23.

According to Chief Matthew Keewaykapow, the band is no longer able to provide critical services to residents. Keewaykapow was quoted in Wawatay News last week as saying, “the situation is beyond our current band resources and we require immediate and long term assistance from our federal and provincial partners.”

The community estimates that 70-80 percent of its roughly 500 residents are addicted to prescription pills, primarily oxycodone. According to the Vancouver Sun, of the 480 residents on Cat Lake, 150 are registered addicts and 120 more are suspected.

Read more: http://www.theargus.ca/articles/news/2012/02/cat-lake-first-nation-declares-state-of-emergency

by NationTalk on February 8, 2012512 Views

Read More
Press ReleasesText

British Columbia Lines Up Aboriginal Learners with Jobs – Daily Commercial

British Columbia lines up Aboriginal learners with jobs

VICTORIA, B.C.
February 8, 2012

A British Columbia training program is connecting Aboriginal learners with growing occupations.

The Aboriginal Training for Employment Program helps participants pursue further studies and employment opportunities such as construction workers, health-care assistants, chefs, entrepreneurs, tourism operators and in many other occupations.
Since the program’s 2010 launch, over 500 Aboriginal learners throughout British Columbia have participated in the program.

With a $4-million investment from the Province through the Canada-British Columbia Labour Market Agreement, participants receive in-class instruction in conjunction with hands-on learning in laboratories or workshops, and work or volunteer experience relevant to their training.

Read more: http://dcnonl.com/article/id48680/–british-columbia-lines-up-aboriginal-learners-with-jobs

by NationTalk on February 8, 2012405 Views

Read More
Press ReleasesText

NAN Releases Education Report – The Chronicle-Journal

NAN releases education report

The Chronicle-Journal
Wednesday, February 8, 2012

Nishnawbe Aski Nation is calling on the federal government to provide stable funding in order to improve education in its communities.

NAN on Tuesday released an independent education report — a day ahead of the release of a similar report by the federal government’s National Panel — that also calls for aboriginal control of aboriginal education.

“NAN is calling on the government of Canada to provide fair and equitable funding for much-needed improvements in education facilities, support services, special education, teachers’ salaries, curriculum, that will ensure that all students in NAN will receive a quality education that meets or exceeds the standards across the rest of Canada,” NAN deputy grand chief Terry Waboose said Tuesday in Thunder Bay.

Read more: http://www.chroniclejournal.com/content/news/local/2012/02/08/nan-releases-education-report

by NationTalk on February 8, 2012587 Views

Read More
Press ReleasesText

Per-Student Model Suggested for Aboriginal Funding Grants – Citizen

Per-student model suggested for Aboriginal funding grants

BY LEXI BAINAS, CITIZEN FEBRUARY 8, 2012

Valley schools will split more than $40,000 in aboriginal grant funding this year but some changes have been suggested in how it’s allocated.

Trustee Hannah Seymour reported to the Cowichan Valley Board of Education Feb. 1 that historically schools simply applied for grant money and assessments were made of each idea.

However, a working group this year has decided to try allocating the money based on providing the school with $30 for each aboriginal student in the school population.

“So, each school would receive a grant,” she said, adding that the overall concept was exciting as it would spread knowledge of aboriginal language and culture more widely throughout the district’s schools.

Read more: http://www.canada.com/student+model+suggested+Aboriginal+funding+grants/6118504/story.html

by NationTalk on February 8, 2012366 Views

Read More
Press ReleasesText

Lessons Learned in Canada Paved Amundsen’s Way to the South Pole: Curator – Ottawa Citizen

Lessons learned in Canada paved Amundsen’s way to the South Pole: curator

By Tom Spears, The Ottawa Citizen February 8, 2012

OTTAWA — A few years before he became the first man to reach the South Pole, Roald Amundsen spent a couple of winters in the Canadian Arctic. That’s where he learned to build an igloo.

The local people laughed at the rookie builder. Even after 20 or 25 attempts, the roof of an Amundsen igloo always caved in at the last moment.

But six years later, when he was crossing Antarctica in severe cold and winds too strong for a tent, he and his team remembered their old skills, and sheltered safely inside an igloo.

Read more: http://www.ottawacitizen.com/Lessons+learned+Canada+paved+Amundsen+South+Pole+curator/6119655/story.html#ixzz1locXFu3y

by NationTalk on February 8, 2012443 Views

Read More
Press ReleasesText

Durham Kids Share Warmth with First Nation Communities – Durham Region

Durham kids share warmth with First Nation communities

Awareness campaign about First Nation communities includes clothing drive

Kristen Calis|Feb 08, 2012

AJAX — It’s all about kindness this month at Dr. Roberta Bondar Public School in Ajax.

The elementary school is taking part in the Durham District School Board’s awareness campaign and winter clothing drive for Ontario First Nation communities.

Organized by the Aboriginal education department’s ‘Spirit Calling Network,’ the board started the drive in partnership with the training unit of the Ontario Provincial Police Aboriginal Policing Bureau in January. A board-wide social action project, the campaign brings focus to the ongoing struggles many First Nation communities experience in northern Ontario and across Canada.

Read more: http://www.durhamregion.com/community/education/article/1293442–durham-kids-share-warmth-with-first-nation-communities

by NationTalk on February 8, 2012510 Views

Read More
Press ReleasesText

T’it’q’et Holds First-Ever Career Fair – Bridge River Lillooet News

T’it’q’et holds first-ever Career Fair

Adult job-seekers link up with employment centre, health, social services, fisheries, forestry reps

FEBRUARY 8, 2012
WENDY FRASER

The first-ever T’it’q’et Career Fair brought together adults seeking employment and agencies offering information on careers in a number of fields.

The fair was held at Julianne Hall on Saturday, Jan. 28.

T’it’q’et education co-ordination Susan Napoleon was one of the organizers of the event, which drew representatives from the Ministry of Forests, Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO), Social Development, T’it’q’et Health, the Association of Aboriginal Financial Officers and the Lillooet Employment Centre. Neal Mason was on hand to talk about careers in counselling and social work and Arnold Adolph offered advice on careers in independent financial planning.

Read more:

by NationTalk on February 8, 2012468 Views

Read More
Press ReleasesText

Chiefs shouldn’t be on casino board, ex-chair says – CBC News

Chiefs shouldn’t be on casino board, ex-chair says

CBC News Posted: Feb 7, 2012

There should be no chiefs or politicians on the Saskatchewan Indian Gaming Authority’s board of directors, a former chair of the board says.

Last year, Kirk Goodtrack was fired as SIGA board chair.

SIGA said Goodtrack, a lawyer, was in a conflict of interest due to his outside legal work. Goodtrack says he had been trying to cut spending by board members.

In a recent interview with CBC News, Goodtrack detailed some of his concerns about governance at SIGA, which oversees six First Nations-run casinos around the province.

Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/saskatchewan/story/2012/02/07/sk-goodtrack-discusses-siga-board-1202.html

by NationTalk on February 7, 2012612 Views

Read More
Press ReleasesText

Scotiabank helps launch FNMI mentorship – Unews

Scotiabank helps launch FNMI mentorship

The University of Lethbridge welcomed Scotiabank officials to campus on Tuesday, Feb. 7 to announce a major gift in support of First Nations, Métis and Inuit (FNMI) students.

The $150,000 investment will help launch a mentorship program aimed at post-secondary students, as well as students in junior high and high schools in Lethbridge and reserve communities throughout southern Alberta.

“This gift demonstrates Scotiabank’s incredible commitment to education and the FNMI community, and sets a strong example for others to follow,” says U of L President Dr. Mike Mahon.

Read more: http://www.uleth.ca/unews/content/scotiabank-helps-launch-fnmi-mentorship

by NationTalk on February 7, 2012448 Views

Read More
Press ReleasesText

Labrador Iron reaches deal with Inuit over operations in Labrador west – CanadianBusiness.com

Labrador Iron reaches deal with Inuit over operations in Labrador west

By The Canadian Press | February 07, 2012

TORONTO – Labrador Iron Mines Holdings Ltd. (TSX:LIM.TO) said Tuesday that it has reached an agreement with representatives of the Inuit people regarding its mining operations in Labrador west.

The deal with the NunatuKavut Community Council, reached last week during the Northern Lights conference in Ottawa, addresses such matters as environmental and cultural protection, jobs, training, aboriginal contracting and other financial aspects.

The NunatuKavut Community Council represents the southern Inuit of Labrador, an aboriginal population of about 6,000 within the communities that line the southern coastal and interior waterways of Labrador.

Read more: http://www.canadianbusiness.com/article/69801–labrador-iron-reaches-deal-with-inuit-over-operations-in-labrador-west

by NationTalk on February 7, 2012378 Views

Read More
Press ReleasesText

TFN mega-mall tip of iceberg of aboriginal development – Surrey Leader

TFN mega-mall tip of iceberg of aboriginal development

Updated: February 07, 2012

The Tsawwassen First Nation’s decision to build a huge shopping district rivalling Metrotown on its treaty land near the ferry terminal captured the public spotlight last month.

But it may be just the tip of the iceberg of land-use upheavals that are to come as more urban First Nations either sign new treaties or, increasingly, pursue business ventures on their reserves without treaties.

“It’s going to be very, very interesting,” predicts Maple Ridge Mayor Ernie Daykin, the chair of Metro Vancouver’s newly created aboriginal affairs committee.

Read more: http://www.surreyleader.com/news/138868449.html

by NationTalk on February 7, 2012486 Views

Read More
Press ReleasesText

Aboriginal centre “a rock” for students – Oshawa Express

Aboriginal centre “a rock” for students

By Katie Richard/The Oshawa Express

Those entering into UOIT’s Aboriginal Resource Centre (ARC) for the first time at its official grand opening were welcomed in the most traditional way.

Smudging ceremonies took place while the Smoke Trail Singers performed honour songs and Elder Cliff Standingready recited the opening and closing prayers. Guests dined on traditional foods like elk stew, bannock and wild rice salad and listened as Aboriginal students, who have benefited first hand from the centre, shared their stories.

The scene inside a lecture hall at the Oshawa university was anything but ordinary. Cedar leaves lined either side of each stairway and the aroma of herbs filled the room.

Read more: http://www.oshawaexpress.ca/viewposting.php?view=2438

by NationTalk on February 7, 2012524 Views

Read More
Press ReleasesText

Tsawout Eye Shopping Centre for Central Saanich – Times Colonist

Tsawout eye shopping centre for Central Saanich

Central Saanich council gets peek at outlines for reserve development

BY KIM WESTAD, TIMESCOLONIST.COM FEBRUARY 7, 2012

A proposed shopping centre on Tsawout First Nation land in Central Saanich would be similar to developments in Langford, the prospective developer says, although he won’t name any specific tenants.

The 650,000-square-foot proposed development at the corner of the Pat Bay Highway and Jesken Road would have two or three large retailers, three to five “midbox retailers” and numerous other spots for restaurants and smaller users, Keith McRae said Monday.

He is representing Property Development Group, a Vancouver company working with the Tsawout band on the proposal.

Read more: http://www.timescolonist.com/Tsawout+shopping+centre+Central+Saanich/6111159/story.html#ixzz1liadDM8u

by NationTalk on February 7, 2012785 Views

Read More
Press ReleasesText

Ruttan: No Water-Sharing Deal Without Snuneymuxw – Daily News

Ruttan: No water-sharing deal without Snuneymuxw

Mayor assures First Nation that pact with Harmac will require their approval

BY ROBERT BARRON, DAILY NEWS FEBRUARY 7, 2012

Nanaimo Mayor John Ruttan has assured the Snuneymuxw First Nation that there will be no water-sharing agreement between the city and the Harmac pulp mill without the band’s consent and approval.

Snuneymuxw Chief Doug White said he was “glad” to hear Ruttan make the commitment and the First Nation intends to hold him to it.

The Snuneymuxw said last week that they are considering launching a series of legal actions, targeting the province, the city and Harmac over a water-sharing agreement being negotiated that could see the city acquire much of Harmac’s water licences for the Nanaimo River.

Read more: http://www.canada.com/Ruttan+water+sharing+deal+without+Snuneymuxw/6112422/story.html

by NationTalk on February 7, 2012463 Views

Read More
Press ReleasesText

Victoria Partners with First Nations on New Prison – Vancouver Sun

Victoria partners with first nations on new prison

360-cell Oliver jail to be built on native land; band likely to get lease payments

By Jonathan Fowlie, Vancouver Sun February 7, 2012

British Columbia will build its next prison on first nations land, the government announced Monday as it unveiled a partnership that will see the construction of a 360-cell facility just north of Oliver.

“We are delighted to be partnering with the Osoyoos Indian Band,” Premier Christy Clark said Monday, adding the deal is the first of its kind in B.C.

“They are an absolutely sterling partner for this project. They are an incredible economic driver for this region,” she added, saying the band owns more businesses per capita than any other first nation in the country.

Read more: http://www.vancouversun.com/news/Victoria+partners+with+first+nations+prison/6111903/story.html#ixzz1liZyGvxr

by NationTalk on February 7, 2012437 Views

Read More
Press ReleasesText

Ottawa Hits Ex-Rural Pharmacist with $3.1-M Suit Over Suspect Claims – Winnipeg Free Press

Ottawa hits ex-rural pharmacist with $3.1-M suit over suspect claims

By: Staff Writer
Posted: 02/7/2012

A former pharmacist in Hodgson, Man., has been hit with a $3.1-million lawsuit.

The lawsuit between Abas Pharmacy and Canada’s attorney general says Abas “fraudulently and negligently misrepresented information and claims submitted between Jan. 1, 2005 and March 31, 2008.”

Abas was known as Fisher Pharmacy and had Murvin Ernest Abas as its managing pharmacist, so both are also named as defendants in the lawsuit.

The lawsuit references how the First Nations and Inuit Health Branch has the Non-Insured Health Benefits Program (NIHBP), which “provides health benefits free of charge… to status Indians and recognized Inuit persons who do not otherwise have insurance coverage either privately or through a provincial plan.”

Read more: http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/local/ottawa-hits-ex-rural-pharmacist-with-31-m-suit-over-suspect-claims-138836329.html

by NationTalk on February 7, 2012973 Views

Read More
Press ReleasesText

MNS Opposes Indian Act Bill – The StarPhoenix

MNS opposes Indian Act bill

THE STARPHOENIX FEBRUARY 7, 2012

The Metis Nation-Saskatchewan (MNS) is joining First Nations in their opposition to a proposed federal bill to repeal the Indian Act.

The private member’s bill, which could be introduced in the coming days by Desnethe-Missinippi-Churchill River MP Rob Clarke, appears to have been crafted without consulting aboriginal leaders, say critics.

They also say it runs contrary to Prime Minister Stephen Harper’s recent pledge to involve First Nations in further discussions about their relationship with the government. Harper also said he would not repeal the Indian Act.

Read more: http://www.thestarphoenix.com/news/opposes+Indian+bill/6111571/story.html

by NationTalk on February 7, 2012493 Views

Read More
Press ReleasesText

U of W showcases its Indigenous studies on new website – Winnipeg Free Press

U of W showcases its Indigenous studies on new website

By: Staff Writer
Posted: 02/6/2012

The University of Winnipeg is showcasing its Indigenous studies and programs on a new website.

The U of W has one of the top Indigenous participation rates in the country, with more than 10 per cent of its students self-identifying as First Nations, Métis, and Inuit. Aboriginal student applications jumped 24 per cent at the university between September 2010 and September 2011.

The newly updated website highlights degree and diploma programs that are unique in Canada including: a master’s degree in Development Practice with a specialization in Indigenous Development; a master’s degree in Indigenous Governance and a bachelor degree in Indigenous Studies; a bachelor degree in Urban and Inner-City Studies; an Indigenous Police Preparation diploma; and an Indigenous Spiritual and Pastoral Care diploma.
Students can also use the website to get information on everything from housing and financial aid to scholarships and support services.

Read more: http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/local/breakingnews/U-of-W-showcases-its-Indigenous-studies-on-new-website-138780894.html

by NationTalk on February 6, 2012436 Views

Read More
Press ReleasesText

Aboriginals ask China to raise human rights issues with Harper on PM’s visit – CanadianBusiness.com

Aboriginals ask China to raise human rights issues with Harper on PM’s visit

By The Canadian Press | February 06, 2012

A group of B.C. aboriginals want China’s president to quiz Prime Minister Stephen Harper on Canada’s human rights record during Harper’s China visit.

They’ve made the request in two letters, one sent to Hu Jintao and one being widely circulated to Chinese media.

A letter to the president says Canadian leaders often raise concerns over China’s rights record and lists a numbers of concerns China should have about Canada.

Read more: http://www.canadianbusiness.com/article/69525–aboriginals-ask-china-to-raise-human-rights-issues-with-harper-on-pm-s-visit

by NationTalk on February 6, 2012646 Views

Read More
Press ReleasesText

Murder trial proceeds despite jury roll questions – CBC.ca

Murder trial proceeds despite jury roll questions

Concerns over lack of Aboriginal representation on jury panel delayed trial for 11 months

CBC News Posted: Feb 6, 2012

Jury selection got underway Monday in a Thunder Bay murder trial, after nearly a year-long delay.

Andre Wareham is charged with second degree murder in the 2009 death of William Atkins. A trial was set to begin last March but a judge ruled the jury pool didn’t adequately represent the Aboriginal population in the region.

Since then defence lawyer Steven Hinkson has been pressing that point. Other jury trials in the city were also delayed.

But on Monday, Justice Terrence Platana proceeded with jury selection. The reasons for his decision are expected to be released soon.

Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/thunder-bay/story/2012/02/06/tby-aboriginal-jury-roll.html

by NationTalk on February 6, 2012721 Views

Read More
Press ReleasesText

First Nations Pet Population Targeted – CBC News

First Nations pet population targeted

CBC News Posted: Feb 6, 2012

A P.E.I. charity and an RCMP officer are working together with First Nations communities on the Island to reduce the number of cats and dogs wandering around reserves.

SpayAid, best known for its work helping low-income Islanders spay or neuter their pets, has expanded its program into Abegweit First Nation at Rocky Point, just outside of Charlottetown, with the help of RCMP Const. Anne O’Shaughnessy.

“I do get a lot of complaints about stray dogs. I get complaints about cats as well, just wandering around, just an overabundance,” said O’Shaughnessy.

“With the community’s involvement, participation, we’re able to pull this off.”

Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/prince-edward-island/story/2012/02/06/pei-firstnations-pets-spayaid-584.html

by NationTalk on February 6, 2012552 Views

Read More
Press ReleasesText

Six Nations Child Agency Explored – Brantford Expositor

Six Nations child agency explored

By SUSAN GAMBLE , EXPOSITOR STAFF

Seventeen years after discussions first began about Six Nations taking over its own child protection agency, the reserve is getting serious about the move.

A series of nine community meetings have been scheduled to gather input from Six Nations members over the next few weeks.

“A number of focus group meetings will be held throughout February to measure community interest in seeking Child Welfare designation,” said band communications officer Karen Best.

In response to a fair bit of agitation from the community in the form of marches, petitions and protests against the Brant Children’s Aid Society, the elected band has opted to get community input toward the idea of setting up an agency dedicated to protecting Six Nations children.

Read more: http://www.brantfordexpositor.ca/ArticleDisplay.aspx?e=3461511

by NationTalk on February 6, 2012547 Views

Read More
Press ReleasesText

NAN Youth Seek Bright Future – The Chronicle-Journal

NAN youth seek bright future

Northwest Bureau
Monday, February 6, 2012

Youth representatives from several Nishnawbe Aski Nation communities will meet Tuesday in Thunder Bay at the Oshkaatisak Niigaan Oji Gathering.

The youth conference, which runs Tuesday to Thursday at the Best Western Nor’Wester, is hosted by the Oshkaatisak Council (formerly Decade for Youth). The group consists of young people from various NAN communities who are committed to increasing the quality of life in First Nation communities.

“More than ever, NAN youth are engaging in community initiatives, becoming better educated, and branching out into rewarding First Nation job opportunities. But, there are also many challenges facing our youth,” NAN deputy Grand Chief Les Louttit said Friday.

Read more: http://www.chroniclejournal.com/content/news/local/2012/02/06/nan-youth-seek-bright-future

by NationTalk on February 6, 2012495 Views

Read More
Press ReleasesText

Chief Wants Answers on ORNGE-Related Death – CBC News

Chief wants answers on ORNGE-related death

Report on 2006 air ambulance death never made public

CBC News Posted: Feb 6, 2012

Nishnawbe Aski Nation has been asking for an investigation into the death of a 54-year-old woman on an ORNGE air ambulance.

Sheila Childsforever died of a heart attack on an ORNGE helicopter while she was being medically evacuated from her home in Wawakapewin First Nation.

CBC News has obtained documents containing an initial coroner’s investigation statement on the 2006 death of Childsforever. The documents say delays in the air ambulance service “had some bearing on this patient’s outcome.”

Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/thunder-bay/story/2012/02/06/tby-ornge-death-questions.html

by NationTalk on February 6, 2012640 Views

Read More
Press ReleasesText

Minding the business of First Nations – Canadian Lawyer Magazine

Minding the business of First Nations

Legal Report: Aboriginal Law

Written by Jennifer Brown
Issue Date: February 2012

When it comes to dealing with First Nations issues in Canada, increasingly, industry and native groups are getting out in front of government in an attempt to build relationships and business. They are working on progressive agreements to advance opportunities economically both for the First Nations communities and the companies to expedite projects, particularly in the resource sector.

The missing link in this push forward, according to many aboriginal law experts, is government’s inability to make decisions and keep Canadian resource projects of interest to investors. “That is the elephant in the room — the government part of the issue and I think many of my First Nation friends would agree. What exactly is the game plan?” says Thomas Isaac, a partner with McCarthy Tétrault LLP who heads up the firm’s aboriginal law group based in Vancouver.

Read more: http://www.canadianlawyermag.com/4029/minding-the-business-of-first-nations.html

by NationTalk on February 6, 2012518 Views

Read More
Press ReleasesText

Turning natives into homeowners – National Post

Turning natives into homeowners

National Post · Feb. 6, 2012

The best argument against collectivist economic policies comes from examining the places that have tried to implement them – and then discarded them. In a short period of time following the collapse of the Soviet Union, for instance, Eastern Europeans went from having to wake up early to stand in long lines for their daily bread, to shopping in supermarkets stocked with an abundance of food from around the world. On a smaller scale, we can see the effects of miniature, Soviet-style welfare states on aboriginal reserves, right here in Canada.

It is unconscionable that, in this day and age, we would continue to maintain a colonial attitude that treats an entire group of Canadian citizens as wards of the state, but that is exactly how the Canadian government’s relationship with First Nations has been institutionalized. Enacted less than a decade after confederation, the Indian Act places strict limits on First Nations’ property rights. Under the terms of the act, the Crown maintains ownership over all reserve land, and grants Indians the right to utilize it. If any Indian wants to take “possession” of a piece of property, or the band wants to lease land to non-Indians, the transaction must be approved by the central government in Ottawa.

Read more: http://www.nationalpost.com/opinion/Turning+natives+into+homeowners/6106258/story.html

by NationTalk on February 6, 2012456 Views

Read More

NationTalk Partners & Sponsors Learn More