S Mainstream Aboriginal Related News

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Marchers Vow to Protect Ancient Burial Site – Dominion Paper

Marchers Vow to Protect Ancient Burial Site

Musqueam set up camp at condo site after infant graves desecrated

by MURRAY BUSH
MAY 7, 2012

MARPOLE, VANCOUVER—The Musqueam First Nation has vowed to shut down condo construction to protect a major ancient burial site at the Marpole Midden. Infant graves were unearthed by heavy excavating equipment at the Vancouver location this week.

More than 100 Musqueam and supporters marched to the construction project at 1338 SW Marine on Thursday, May 3. The marchers included representatives from several First Nations. Musqueam are now occupying outside the site and say they will remain until protection for the site is assured.

The move to protect their 4,000-year-old village site come after more burials were dug up by the condo developer. Construction stopped six weeks ago when the developer first disturbed intact burials. Musqueam leaders say promised talks with the developer, the city and the province have gone nowhere.

Read more: http://www.dominionpaper.ca/articles/4460

by NationTalk on May 8, 2012545 Views

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Aboriginal justice program gets more funding – CBC.ca

Aboriginal justice program gets more funding

Federal government announces $12.5M for one year

CBC News Posted: May 8, 2012

The Aboriginal Justice Strategy will be funded for another year.

The federal government announced it will give $12.5 million to the strategy, which helps to support community justice programs across Canada.

“We’ve been using them as additional funding for our funding to communities, so it’s really, really good news,” said Rebekah Williams, Nunavut’s assistant deputy minister for the Department of Justice.

Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/north/story/2012/05/08/north-aboriginal-justice-funding-renewed.html

by NationTalk on May 8, 2012596 Views

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Allies Brock, Tecumseh reunited on stamps – Vancouver Sun

Allies Brock, Tecumseh reunited on stamps

The two leaders were key players in conflict that was ‘a defining moment for the provinces’

BY RANDY BOSWELL, POSTMEDIA NEWS MAY 8, 2012

Nearly two centuries after they died as allies thwarting an American invasion of Canada, the country’s pre-eminent War of 1812 battlefield heroes – British general Sir Isaac Brock and aboriginal chief Tecumseh – have been reunited in a set of commemorative stamps to be issued by Canada Post.

The stamps are the first in a series of souvenir issues to be unveiled over the next three years to mark the bicentennial of the 1812-1814 war. The Brock and Tecumseh stamps go on sale on June 15, three days before the 200th anniversary of the U.S. declaration of war against Britain and its North American colonies.

Read more: http://www.vancouversun.com/life/Allies+Brock+Tecumseh+reunited+stamps/6584166/story.html#ixzz1uI4INVuC

by NationTalk on May 8, 2012508 Views

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Aboriginal centre gets OK to create more child-care support – Canada.com

Aboriginal centre gets OK to create more child-care support

DAILY NEWS MAY 8, 2012

A new child-care centre will open soon to help young mothers with the support and skills they need to raise children.

The Tillicum Lelum Aboriginal Friendship Centre has won a development permit to build a two-storey mother and child-care support centre on Tenth Street. It will be the latest addition to the growing south-end service site and an important program for teen mothers seeking help stabilizing their lives, support workers say.

The $2.9-million facility is still in the early fundraising stages, although preliminary design plans have been created. Centre staff members say the facility will meet the growing need for child care in south Nanaimo and provide young mothers with the tools they need to keep their children out of the foster-care system.

Read more: http://www.canada.com/Aboriginal+centre+gets+create+more+child+care+support/6583712/story.html

by NationTalk on May 8, 2012437 Views

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Aboriginal News in 2012 – Daily Business Buzz

Aboriginal News in 2012

Published on May 7, 2012

(Originally published in the May 2012 issue of the Nova Scotia Business Journal – “Aboriginal Awareness Week” special advertising feature)

APC Secretariat initiatives receive funding boost: On February 22, Bernard Valcourt, Minister of State for the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency (ACOA) and La Francophonie, announced a Government of Canada investment of more than $670,000 to renew two initiatives that support Aboriginal economic development in Atlantic Canada. The funding will be used to support the Atlantic Aboriginal Economic Development Integrated Research Program and the Professional Development Training initiative for Aboriginal Economic Development Officers. Both initiatives are administered by the Atlantic Policy Congress of First Nations Chiefs Secretariat. “This investment will assist in providing our region’s First Nations with the knowledge, tools and resources they need to secure a brighter, more prosperous future for their people and their communities,” said Minister Valcourt. The Government of Canada is contributing $672,249 in 2011-2012 to support the two initiatives. ACOA is investing a total of $206,203, while Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada is contributing an additional $441,046. The Department of Fisheries and Oceans and the Province of Nova Scotia are each investing a further $25,000 in the Atlantic Aboriginal Economic Development Integrated Research Program.

Read more: http://www.ns.dailybusinessbuzz.ca/Industry%20Spotlight/Aboriginal%20Awareness%20Week/2012-05-07/article-2972723/Aboriginal-News-in-2012/1

by NationTalk on May 8, 2012676 Views

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Treaty process mires BC First Nations in $420M debt – CBC.ca

Treaty process mires B.C. First Nations in $420M debt

The Canadian Press Posted: May 7, 2012

Ottawa needs to consider a flexible exit strategy for British Columbia First Nations frustrated and debt-challenged by slow-moving treaty negotiations, says a special report prepared for federal Aboriginal Affairs Minister John Duncan.

The 47-page report by former Campbell River, B.C., mayor James Lornie, appointed Duncan’s special B.C. treaty representative last year, states First Nations treaty negotiations debt now tops $420 million, which is insurmountable and an unsustainable barrier to reaching treaties.

The report doesn’t suggest dumping the treaty process after more than 20 years of negotiations, but states First Nations need the option to leave the table without feeling intense pressure to pay off debts and with nothing to show after years of talks.

Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/story/2012/05/07/bc-first-nations-treaty-debt.html

by NationTalk on May 8, 2012403 Views

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35 amazing Canadian women – Canadian Living

35 amazing Canadian women

By Jaime Eisen and Elizabeth Zahur

We celebrate the incredible Canadian women who inspire us.

Every day, we run into amazing women who make us stop and look at life a little differently. And so, we think it’s fitting to honour some of these Canadians. Our pick includes some who are famous and some who aren’t — from an international opera star to a young medical researcher. We think they will inspire you, too.

Sheila Watt-Cloutier, who grew up in Kuujjuaq, Nunavik, in northern Quebec, has focused on the health and cultural survival of the Inuit and Arctic Aboriginal Peoples. Now her focus is on climate change and how best to protect the Arctic and save the planet.

Elisapee Sheutiapik, is the president of Pauktuutit Inuit Women of Canada, an organization to help protect the rights of women and children. She renamed one street leading to a women’s shelter “Angel Street” and challenged other communities to make their own Angel Streets as memorials to Canadian victims of domestic violence.

Read more: http://www.canadianliving.com/life/community/35_amazing_canadian_women.php

by NationTalk on May 8, 2012981 Views

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Ottawa urged to offer BC bands treaty talk exit strategy – CTV.ca

Ottawa urged to offer B.C. bands treaty talk exit strategy

By: Dirk Meissner , The Canadian Press
Date: Monday May. 7, 2012

Ottawa needs to consider a flexible exit strategy for British Columbia First Nations frustrated and debt-challenged by slow-moving treaty negotiations, says a special report prepared for federal Aboriginal Affairs Minister John Duncan.

The 47-page report by former Campbell River, B.C., mayor James Lornie, appointed Duncan’s special B.C. treaty representative last year, states First Nations treaty negotiations debt now tops $420 million, which is insurmountable and an unsustainable barrier to reaching treaties.

The report doesn’t suggest dumping the treaty process after more than 20 years of negotiations, but states First Nations need the option to leave the table without feeling intense pressure to pay off debts and with nothing to show after years of talks.

Read more: http://www.ctvbc.ctv.ca/servlet/an/local/CTVNews/20120507/bc_first_nations_treaty_talk_exit_strategy_120507/20120507?hub=BritishColumbiaHome

by NationTalk on May 7, 2012619 Views

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More work needed to end domestic violence – Canada.com

More work needed to end domestic violence

THE DAILY NEWS MAY 7, 2012

The B.C. government took a step in the right direction when it invested close to $1 million for the provincial office of domestic violence.

Domestic violence is an ongoing problem that is kept hidden by perpetrators and many victims.

The investment of $878,000 is to support the important work of ensuring coordination and collaboration of domestic violence programs and services throughout government.

The funding will support eight new full-time staff members to ensure co-ordination and accountability across government programs and services in all B.C. communities.

Read more: http://www.canada.com/More+work+needed+domestic+violence/6577421/story.html

by NationTalk on May 7, 2012577 Views

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Redressing History: First Nation Leaders’ Hopes for the UN Forum – Indian Country Today

Redressing History: First Nation Leaders’ Hopes for the U.N. Forum

By ICTMN Staff May 7, 2012

When the World Council of Churches (WCC) formally renounced the Doctrine of Discovery in February, it was welcome news for Native peoples. Promulgated by Pope Nicholas V in the 1450s, the doctrine effectively called for non-Christians to be subjugated, their land seized. Some deem it a veritable open invitation to commit aboriginal genocide.

The WCC’s about-face could augur well for broader awareness, indigenous leaders hope, especially those in Canada. This month’s 11th Session of the U.N. Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues, which runs from May 7–18, could offer opportunities to address that, First Nations leaders told Indian Country Today Media Network ahead of the forum.

At the heart of the ongoing conflict is that well-known, colossal misunderstanding that Canada’s aboriginals are still trying to rectify. Everyone knows that the Doctrine of Discovery held that the lands of the so-called New World—as “discovered” by Columbus and his contemporaries—were not Christian and were therefore considered empty, their inhabitants barely human.

Read more: http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2012/05/07/redressing-history-first-nation-leaders-hopes-for-the-u-n-forum-111644#ixzz1uDX7HvKm

by NationTalk on May 7, 2012383 Views

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Biwaase’aa Outreach Workers – “We are the real deal” – Net Newsledger

Biwaase’aa Outreach Workers – “We are the real deal”

Written by: NNL-News on May 7, 2012.

THUNDER BAY – Biwaase’aa Youth Outreach Worker Kelvin Redsky can sum up himself and his fellow workers in just a few words.

“We are the real deal,” states Redsky. In the photograph, Biwaase’aa Youth Outreach Worker Kelvin Redsky is sharing Sweat Lodge teachings with students in Thunder Bay.

What Redsky means is that he and the other outreach workers who work with children in need in seven Thunder Bay schools are not only trained to help them with their school work but are also able to support their cultural and spiritual needs. They are able to do this, says Redsky, because they all are steeped in and, in many ways, living the Aboriginal traditions. Among their ranks are pipe carriers and drum carriers who are all, he says, mindful of the responsibilities that go with the positions.

Read more: http://netnewsledger.com/2012/05/07/biwaaseaa-outreach-workers-we-are-the-real-deal/

by NationTalk on May 7, 2012575 Views

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Aboriginal pictographs digitally enhanced back to life – CBC.ca

Aboriginal pictographs digitally enhanced back to life

Digitally enhancing pictures of historic rock paintings a window into life hundreds of years ago

CBC News Posted: May 7, 2012

Aboriginal elders and Parks Canada archaeologists have just completed a two-year project to photograph and interpret several ancient pictograph sites along the foothills and mountains in Alberta and B.C.

Many of the fading ochre paintings are barely recognizable, but thanks to some new camera technology, those paintings are teaching a new generation about the distant past.

On an outcrop near Okotoks, Alta., some orange smudges on a rock wall are the only faded hint of an ancient aboriginal pictograph.

Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/calgary/story/2012/05/06/calgary-parks-canada-pictographs.html

by NationTalk on May 7, 2012979 Views

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Aboriginal Health Services Is Here For You? – Portage Online

Aboriginal Health Services Is Here For You

Written by Jennifer Campbell
Monday, 07 May 2012

First Nation, Metis, and Inuit people can now access culturally sensitive health services which are better suited to their needs in Portage.

Doretta Harris Regional Director of Aboriginal Services for the Central RHA says support workers help Aboriginal people through the journey in various ways. They provide interpretive and spiritual services, share resource material that’s culturally meaningful, and organize traditional healing services. Harris notes there used to be no specified service that matched the needs of First Nation, Metis, and Inuit people and hopefully this is filling the gaps.

Read more: http://www.portageonline.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=26874&Itemid=33

by NationTalk on May 7, 2012550 Views

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A time to learn, a time to dance‎ – Winnipeg Free Press

A time to learn, a time to dance

U of M hosts traditional grad powwow

By: Gabrielle Giroday
Posted: 05/6/2012

Kimberly Hart thought she might never learn to powwow dance.

But there the 34-year-old was Saturday afternoon, in a resplendent outfit in a fluorescent-lit athletic centre at the University of Manitoba.

Hart, who’s pursuing her master’s in social work at the U of M, hasn’t graduated yet but attended the traditional graduation powwow intending to dance.

She started learning powwow dancing last fall by going to a club once a week to learn some of the moves and borrowed hair ties to wear with her own dress.

Read more: http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/local/a-time-to-learn-a-time-to-dance-150334065.html

by NationTalk on May 7, 2012665 Views

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NAC’s all-aboriginal King Lear begins to take shape – Globe and Mail

NAC’s all-aboriginal King Lear begins to take shape

J. KELLY NESTRUCK
Published Sunday, May. 06, 2012

For August Schellenberg, starring in the National Arts Centre’s all-aboriginal production of King Lear is a dream more than four decades in the making.

The actor, who is of Mohawk descent, first conceived the idea for an aboriginal Lear in the fall of 1967, when, after an acclaimed season at the Stratford Festival, he was in Vancouver performing in the premiere of George Ryga’s seminal Canadian play, The Ecstasy of Rita Joe.

The late director John Juliani remarked to Schellenberg that his Rita Joe co-star Chief Dan George would make a great Lear – and Schellenberg immediately begin to imagine the play with an entire cast of native actors. “From that point on, I believed that an all-aboriginal production of Lear would happen some day,” says the actor, who, at 75, is a Stratford and Shaw Festival veteran, and has acted onscreen opposite Peter O’Toole, Vanessa Redgrave and Len Cariou.

Read more: http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/arts/theatre/nacs-all-aboriginal-king-lear-begins-to-take-shape/article2423261/?from=sec434

by NationTalk on May 7, 2012528 Views

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strategy will pressure Harper to act‎ – Winnipeg Free Press

Canada’s first-ever mental health strategy will pressure Harper to act

By: Heather Scoffield, The Canadian Press
Posted: 05/6/2012

OTTAWA – Canada is about to get its first-ever national mental health strategy — a massive report that may persuade Prime Minister Stephen Harper that his government must return Ottawa to a lead role on health care.

On Tuesday, after five years of research, consultations with thousands of people, modelling, forecasting and much agonizing, the Mental Health Commission of Canada will finally deliver the blueprint the Harper government requested.

The Canadian Press has learned that the strategy will launch a call to action targeted not just at the federal government, but also at provincial governments, health-care professionals, businesses, philanthropists and volunteers.

Read more: http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/canada/canadas-first-ever-mental-health-strategy-will-pressure-harper-to-act-150347085.html

by NationTalk on May 7, 2012422 Views

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First Nations group plans to dig in over mine concerns – The Province

First Nations group plans to dig in over mine concerns

BY SAM COOPER, THE PROVINCE MAY 6, 2012

After the province green-lighted a gold and copper mine which promises to bring 250 jobs to northwestern B.C., a First Nations group said it intends to fight the project because of “major contamination risk.”

On Friday Premier Christy Clark’s government issued a permit to the controversial Red Chris Mine near Dease Lake. The mine was already approved by the province, but faced hurdles due to a 2010 Supreme Court of Canada case won by environmentalists.

“The 250 full-time jobs will create stronger families and communities for many years to come,” Clark said.

Read more: http://www.theprovince.com/technology/First+Nations+group+plans+over+mine+concerns/6574281/story.html#ixzz1uChET73e

by NationTalk on May 7, 2012424 Views

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Politics a threat to native health? – Victoria Times Colonist

Politics a threat to native health

TIMES COLONIST MAY 6, 2012

The National Aboriginal Health Organization is about to be dissolved. It was blown up in last month’s federal budget.

That it’s gone we know for sure. But why the axe fell is another matter. And what will replace it is the major question.

The NAHO was set up in 2000, with a mandate to coordinate health education and research among Canada’s native peoples.

According to Health Minister Leona Aglukkaq, the NAHO lost the confidence of aboriginal leaders. Three groups of native politicians – the Assembly of First Nations, the Métis National Council and Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami – had told the government they wanted nothing more to do with the agency.

Read more: http://www.timescolonist.com/technology/Politics+threat+native+health/6574635/story.html#ixzz1uCgt2TzY

by NationTalk on May 7, 2012630 Views

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Sagkeeng trio dancing on air over talent finals‎ – Winnipeg Free Press

Sagkeeng trio dancing on air over talent finals

By: Brad Oswald
Posted: 05/5/2012

This has, it goes without saying, turned out to be a much bigger deal than the three teens from Sagkeeng First Nation ever imagined.

When traditional dancers Vince O’Laney and Brandon and Dallas Courchene decided last fall to audition for Citytv’s Canada’s Got Talent, the idea didn’t amount to much more than a whim and a half-decent excuse to spend a day in the city.

As it turns out, the trio of Manitoba teens — performing as Sagkeeng’s Finest — have exactly the kind of talent the show’s judges and viewers are looking for. Flash forward a few hard-jigging months, and Sagkeeng’s Finest have danced their way into the final performance showdown (Sunday, May 13 on Citytv) of Canada’s Got Talent’s inaugural season.

Read more: http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/arts-and-life/entertainment/TV/sagkeeng-trio-dancing-on-air-over-talent-finals-150274475.html

by NationTalk on May 7, 2012502 Views

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City administrators approve funding for Truth and Reconciliation event‎ – 650 CKOM

City administrators approve funding for Truth and Reconciliation event

Organizers of this year’s Truth and Reconciliation event at Prairieland Park gets nod of approval from city administration

Reported by Fan-Yee Suen
First Posted: May 6, 2012

City administrators approved a $100,000 funding request from the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) of Canada to host a four-day event dedicated to residential school survivors.

The national ceremony, which is expected to attract up to 80,000 visitors and generate over $2-million in tourism money for the city, will take place at Prairieland Park.

“The national events are a mechanism through which the truth and reconciliation process will engage the Canadian public and provide education about the Indian Residential School (IRS) system, the experience of former students and their families, and the ongoing legacies of the institutions,” read a report to the city’s executive committee.

Read more: http://www.newstalk650.com/story/city-administrators-approve-funding-truth-and-reconciliation-event/55635

by NationTalk on May 7, 2012451 Views

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Canada’s lead in energy sector threatened, Atco chief warns‎ – Calgary Herald

Canada’s lead in energy sector threatened, Atco chief warns

By Dave Cooper, edmontonjournal.com May 4, 2012

EDMONTON – Provincial and federal political leaders like to talk about how Alberta and Canada are world leaders on the energy scene, says Atco chief executive Nancy Southern.

“But we won’t be there in the future unless we can deliver electricity around the province, move our natural gas around the country and move our bitumen out for export,” she said Thursday.

As CEO of one of Canada’s biggest utilities companies with interests in natural gas, pipelines and electricity, Southern admits growing frustration at the lack of what she considers factual debate around energy issues.

Read more: http://www.calgaryherald.com/business/business/6562222/story.html#ixzz1twBF2vIE

by NationTalk on May 4, 2012661 Views

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Bands have no real policing power, Mohawk chief complains at human rights hearing -‎ Toronto Star

Bands have no real policing power, Mohawk chief complains at human rights hearing

Peter Edwards

Native bands have only two options if they’re unhappy with the conduct of police officers working on their reserves, an Ontario Human Rights Tribunal was told Friday.

“You put up with the bad conduct — or you terminate employment,” said R. Don Maracle, chief of the Mohawks of the Bay of Quinte.

His comments came at a hearing into the 2008 firing of Tyendinaga Police Chief Larry Hay by former OPP Commissioner Julian Fantino. Hay lost his job with the eastern Ontario native force after speaking out against what he called “deep-seated” racism within the OPP, RCMP and Sûreté du Québec, in an interview with a student newspaper.

Fantino, now an MP for Vaughan, is expected to testify Tuesday.

Read more: http://www.thestar.com/news/canada/article/1173321–bands-have-no-real-policing-power-mohawk-chief-complains-at-human-rights-hearing

by NationTalk on May 4, 2012740 Views

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A weak commitment to maternal health‎ – Ottawa Citizen

A weak commitment to maternal health

BY ELIZABETH PAYNE, THE OTTAWA CITIZEN MAY 4, 2012

By the time the dust settles from the federal budget, Canada will have slashed bilateral foreign aid to eight countries, mostly in Africa, with some of the highest rates of maternal and infant death in the world, Malawi and Niger among them. On the other hand, it will continue sending foreign aid to Ukraine, whose rates of maternal death are not far behind many western nations, and other middle income countries with which Canada has trade interests.

Meanwhile, when you factor in a growing list of cuts to aboriginal health organizations that many fear will worsen already poor maternal and infant health at home in Canada’s North, a trend emerges.

Can the Conservative government still call itself a champion of maternal health?

Read more: http://www.ottawacitizen.com/business/weak+commitment+maternal+health/6561844/story.html#ixzz1twAMqxXk

by NationTalk on May 4, 2012567 Views

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Province must honour treaty land commitments‎ – StarPhoenix

Province must honour treaty land commitments

BY DOUG CUTHAND, SPECIAL TO THE STARPHEONIX MAY 4, 2012

“Invest in land; they’re not making it anymore,” said Mark Twain.

In September 1992, 27 chiefs, the prime minister and our premier gathered at Wanuskewin Heritage Park and signed the history-making Treaty Land Entitlement Agreement. Now, 20 years later, many First Nations continue to add to their land base in accordance with the agreement.

There are two levels of land acquisition: First, we have the shortfall acres, which is land the First Nation was entitled to but wasn’t given when the initial survey was made. Under treaty provisions each first Nation was eligible for 640 acres for a family of five, or 128 acres per person. For various reasons, including shoddy counting on the part of the surveyors, the full land allotment was not realized. It is passing strange that they always surveyed less than the band required.

Read more: http://www.thestarphoenix.com/news/Province+must+honour+treaty+land+commitments/6563998/story.html#ixzz1tw9wytHn

by NationTalk on May 4, 2012541 Views

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First Nations court seen as path out of vicious cycle‎ – kamloopsnews.ca

First Nations court seen as path out of vicious cycle

‘We can do it here,’ Tke’mlups lawyer says

MAY 3, 2012
BY MIKE YOUDS
DAILY NEWS STAFF REPORTER

Local bands have asked for a First Nations court to be established in Kamloops, delegates heard Thursday at an Aboriginal justice forum at TRU.

The forum focused on the Aboriginal sentencing principles of Gladue, recently reaffirmed by the Supreme Court of Canada, while hosting Justice Marion Buller Bennett of First Nations court in New Westminster.

Of Aboriginal descent, the judge took it on her own initiative six years ago to open the province’s first court dedicated to restorative justice for sentencing on criminal and family court matters. A similar court opened in North Vancouver last month.

Read more: http://www.kamloopsnews.ca/article/20120503/KAMLOOPS0101/120509891/-1/kamloops01/first-nations-court-seen-as-path-out-of-vicious-cycle

by NationTalk on May 4, 2012602 Views

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Consider entire labour strategy‎ – StarPhoenix

Consider entire labour strategy

BY ROB NORRIS, THE STARPHOENIX MAY 4, 2012

Norris is Saskatchewan’s minister of Advanced Education, Employment and Immigration.

Your editorial, Look to hiring First Nations (SP, April 23), offers only a partial picture of Saskatchewan’s strategy for addressing its pressing labour market needs.

Our future not only requires a focus on the success of our current residents, but includes inviting those from across Canada and around the world to help bolster our momentum.

The editorial implies that I advocate for immigration as the primary solution to solve our labour shortages when, in fact, our government implemented a three-pronged strategy to meet our skilled labour shortage.

Read more: http://www.thestarphoenix.com/business/Consider+entire+labour+strategy/6564001/story.html#ixzz1tw9DwMRw

by NationTalk on May 4, 2012558 Views

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First Nations scholar and elder to speak at College of the Rockies‎ – Kootenay News

First Nations scholar and elder to speak at College of the Rockies

Updated: May 03, 2012

Well-known First Nations scholar, speaker and elder, Dr. E. Richard Atleo, will give a free presentation at College of the Rockies on Thursday, May 10. During his visit to the region he will also spend time with the elders and members of the Ktunaxa Nation.

“The Ktunaxa Nation would like to welcome Dr. Atleo to Ktunaxa Territory,” said Ktunaxa Nation Chair, Kathryn Teneese. “He is highly respected within the First Nation community and we are grateful for the opportunity the College has provided for our citizens and local residents to hear him speak.”

Dr. Atleo will be exploring the themes put forth his books Tsawalk: A Nuu-chah-nulth Worldview (UBC Press, 2004) and Principles of Tsawalk: An Indigenous Approach to Global Crisis. Tsawalk basically means “one” and it encapsulates an understanding of the universe as an integrated and orderly whole, expressed as heshook-ish tsawalk—everything is one.

Read more: http://www.kootenayadvertiser.com/community/150018835.html

by NationTalk on May 4, 2012613 Views

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Human rights panel probes firing of native OPP officer‎ – Toronto Star

Human rights panel probes firing of native OPP officer

Published On Thu May 03 2012
Peter Edwards

Fired native officers ‘vulnerable,’ rights hearing told

First Nations officers can be arbitrarily fired by the Ontario Provincial Police, but don’t enjoy the full benefits of non-aboriginal officers, an Ontario Human Rights Tribunal hearing has been told.

“I feel vulnerable,” said Const. Marcel Maracle, who joined the Tyendinaga force in Eastern Ontario 20 years ago.

Maracle was testifying at the hearing for Larry Hay, a former Mohawk police chief who was fired in 2008 by former OPP commissioner Julian Fantino.

Read more: http://www.thestar.com/news/article/1172891–human-rights-panel-probes-firing-of-native-opp-officer?bn=1

by NationTalk on May 4, 2012745 Views

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First Nations’ thoughts need to be considered‎ – Victoria Times Colonist

First Nations’ thoughts need to be considered

By Richard MacKenzie, Times Colonist May 4, 2012

Re: “Totem’s message to rise again” and “Mining company letter criticized,” May 1.

The two articles illustrate the incongruity between First Nation and European values and thinking.

The first story looked at the project being taken on by master carver Tony Hunt to reproduce a ceremonial pole first carved in 1958 by his grandfather, Mungo Martin, to grace the grounds of Government House. The second story dealt with a letter from Taseko Mines Ltd. president Russell Hallbauer asking Ottawa to ignore aboriginal requests to consider native “spirituality” as a factor in determining whether the Fish Lake Prosperity Mine can go ahead.

Traditional First Nations thought is holistically land-based – all the elements of nature work as one and cannot be segmented to allow the exploitation of one element to the detriment of the others.

Read more: http://www.timescolonist.com/First+Nations+thoughts+need+considered/6565372/story.html#ixzz1tw7yNysp

by NationTalk on May 4, 2012600 Views

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First Nations group opposes creation of Gateway pipeline‎ – StarPhoenix

First Nations group opposes creation of Gateway pipeline

By Jason Warick, The StarPhoenix May 4, 2012

A crowd of about 200 local supporters sang, danced and held up signs as members of a British Columbia First Nations coalition arrived at Saskatoon’s Via Rail station on Thursday.

Members of the Yinka-Dene Alliance oppose the Northern Gateway oil pipeline proposal, which would run from Alberta’s oilsands to the Pacific coast. The group is travelling cross-country by rail. Later this month in Toronto, it plans to attend the annual meeting of Enbridge, the company proposing the pipeline.

“We want to thank you all for being here with us,” said Chief Na’Miks, one of the five clan chiefs of the Wet’suwet’en First Nation of north-central B.C.

Read more: http://www.thestarphoenix.com/business/First+Nations+group+opposes+creation+Gateway+pipeline/6563969/story.html#ixzz1tw7e3kUH

by NationTalk on May 4, 2012536 Views

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Aboriginal Education Agreement signed in Quebec‎ – Net Newsledger

Aboriginal Education Agreement signed in Quebec

May 4th, 2012 by NNL-News

ODANAK, PQ – The federal government continues to work to boost educational opportunities for Aboriginal youth. Today, the governments of Canada, Quebec, and the Assembly of First Nations of Quebec and Labrador (AFNQL), on behalf of the First Nations Education Council of Quebec (FNEC), have signed an agreement to support and improve the academic success of First Nation students.

Ghislain Picard, Chief of AFNQL, said, “It is my hope that this partnership will give us a better understanding of the needs of First Nation students and help the parties, within the scope of their responsibilities and jurisdictions and in the spirit of co-operation and sharing of expertise, to prepare these students so they can take their rightful place in society in general and as citizens of First Nations. There is still a great deal to be done to improve the living conditions of First Nation peoples, and to achieve this we share the firm belief that education must be viewed more as an investment than as an expense. Also, I would like to emphasize the current government’s recent decision to support a motion that includes a commitment to adequately fund First Nation schools, so that all First Nation children, without exception, have access to quality education. I am eager to see this commitment fulfilled, and the AFNQL and FNEC will be pleased to lend their support.”

Read more: http://netnewsledger.com/2012/05/04/aboriginal-education-agreement-signed-in-quebec/

by NationTalk on May 4, 2012468 Views

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BC regulations to govern First Nations projects‎ – CBC.ca

B.C. regulations to govern First Nations projects

CBC News Posted: May 4, 2012

The British Columbia government has introduced legislation that will permit provincial regulations to apply to commercial, industrial and residential developments on two aboriginal development projects.

The move is meant to make it easier for First Nations entrepreneurs to conduct business on reserve lands, according B.C.’s Minister of Aboriginal Relations and Reconciliation Mary Polak.

“This is really an historic opportunity,” Polak said at a news conference shortly after introducing Bill 43, The First Nations Commercial and Industrial Development Act Implementation Act.

Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/story/2012/05/04/bc-aboriginal-development-act.html

by NationTalk on May 4, 2012704 Views

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NHLPA Goals & Dreams Fund Donation to Girls Hockey in Nunavut – activecircle.ca

NHLPA Goals & Dreams Fund Donation to Girls Hockey in Nunavut

2012-05-04

The Nashville Predators’ Jordin Tootoo worked with the NHLPA Goals & Dreams fund this year to help give young girls in Nunavut the opportunity to play hockey.

The Nashville Predators’ Jordin Tootoo worked with the NHLPA Goals & Dreams fund this year to help give young girls in Nunavut the opportunity to play hockey. The Hall Beach Girls Hockey Association recently received 32 sets of brand new equipment for the girls (aged 9-17). The Hall Beach program focuses on equal opportunity for girls, while helping to improve the lifestyle of its participants.

Read more: http://www.activecircle.ca/en/news-788-nhlpa-goals-dreams-fund-donation-to-girls

by NationTalk on May 4, 2012503 Views

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Youth form vision for healthier living in northern communities – Wawatay News

Youth form vision for healthier living in northern communities

Thursday May 3, 2012
Adrienne Fox – Special to Wawatay News

“Is it connected?” asks the young man who is blindfolded.

“Yes it’s connected … oh no it broke on you!” giggles the young woman guiding him.

“What happened?” he asks.

“Holay!” she squeals.

“I’m gonna eat this marshmallow,” she smiles.

“Oh no,” groans the young man as he feels his tower start to tilt dangerously to one side.

The object of all their attention is a framework construct of dry spaghetti pasta held precariously together by miniature marshmallows.

Read more: http://www.wawataynews.ca/archive/all/2012/5/3/youth-form-vision-healthier-living-northern-communities_22750

by NationTalk on May 4, 2012576 Views

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April in Review – Dominion Paper

April in Review

LGBTQ activist mourned, Missing Women commission scorned, foreign workers’ salaries shorn

MAY 2, 2012

Opposition to tankers, oil and gas pipelines on Canada’s West coast continued. Hundreds of people gathered at the BC provincial legislature in Victoria, for the Rally Against Enbridge. Enbridge is the company behind the controversial Northern Gateway pipeline that would carry tar sands crude from northern Alberta to port in BC, leading to a rise in tanker traffic. Critics say that both the pipeline and the tanker traffic pose a significant risk of oil spills and environmental contamination.

The US Justice Department filed the first criminal charges connected to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in 2010. A former BP Engineer, Kurt Mix, was arrested on charges of deleting hundreds of text messages between himself and his supervisor that were related to the failed attempts at plugging the BP well, which continues to leak crude oil into the Gulf of Mexico.

Read more: http://www.dominionpaper.ca/articles/4453

by NationTalk on May 4, 2012436 Views

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The traditional diet healing path – Wawatay News

The traditional diet healing path

Thursday May 3, 2012
Chris Kornacki – Special to Wawatay News

For the past year and a half Duck Bay First Nation band member Bossy Ducharme has been on a traditional diet. He ate only Native foods, pre-European contact. No McDonalds, no pizza, just mostly wild rice, berries, nuts and wild game.

“I wanted to prove that there’s a connection to what we eat and our quality of life,” Ducharme said.

Ducharme started his diet on September 21, 2010 and continued through January 31, 2012.

Read more: http://www.wawataynews.ca/archive/all/2012/5/3/traditional-diet-healing-path_22749

by NationTalk on May 4, 2012562 Views

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Rising Flood Evacuee Claims Red-Flagged Last Fall – Winnipeg Free Press

Rising flood evacuee claims red-flagged last fall

By: Larry Kusch

FEDERAL and provincial officials were concerned about inflated numbers of flood evacuees from Lake St. Martin as far back as early November.

Alarms were raised at a Nov. 3 teleconference of government officials and representatives of the Manitoba Association of Native Fire Fighters (MANFF), which delivers assistance to First Nations evacuees.

“We came to the conclusion we may be faced with a situation where we were getting some ineligible evacuees joining the rolls,” said Lee Spencer, director of recovery with Manitoba’s Emergency Measures Organization.

Read more: http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/local/rising-flood-evacuee-claims-red-flagged-last-fall-149968235.html

by NationTalk on May 3, 2012410 Views

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Backroom Smelter Decision Already Made, Chief Says – CBC News

Cliffs Natural Resources misleading investors, chief says

CBC News Posted: May 3, 2012

The Chief of Aroland First Nation says Cliffs Natural Resources is misleading its investors about the discussions surrounding its chromite property in the Ring of Fire, located in the James Bay lowlands.

Sonny Gagnon said Cliffs is telling people it is having good discussions with First Nations — and that the environmental assessment (EA) process is moving along.

“Very good discussions with the external stakeholders, and with the First Nations and with the governments and the environmental impact study is moving along,” Cliffs CEO Joseph Carrabba said on a first quarter earnings conference call, April 26.

Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/thunder-bay/story/2012/05/03/sby-cliffs-smelter.html

by NationTalk on May 3, 2012557 Views

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Food Monitor to Examine Canada’s ‘Broken’ System that Affects Right to Food – Postmedia News

Food monitor to examine Canada’s ‘broken’ system that affects right to food

BY SARAH SCHMIDT, POSTMEDIA NEWS MAY 3, 2012

Canada has the dubious distinction of being the first wealthy nation to face a probe by the United Nations Special Rapporteur on the right to food.

The 11-day mission begins Saturday, and will take Olivier De Schutter to Toronto, Ottawa, Montreal, Winnipeg and Edmonton, as well as remote aboriginal communities in Manitoba and Alberta. Until now, the independent expert appointed by the UN’s Human Rights Council has been dispatched to countries such as South Africa, Cuba and Lebanon to probe those nations’ records on ensuring people have access to food.

Canada is the first developed country facing a probe since the UN created the position in 2000, and the report on the mission, to be presented to the UN Human Rights Council, will be part of Canada’s official international human rights record.

Read more: http://www.vancouversun.com/health/Food+monitor+examine+Canada+broken+system+that+affects+right+food/6557580/story.html#ixzz1tpgiVPHt

by NationTalk on May 3, 2012394 Views

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Natives Agree to Go, Leave Protest Camp at Coldwater Museum – Midland Free Press

Natives agree to go, leave protest camp at Coldwater museum

By MIRANDA MINASSIAN

Hoping to foster good faith with the stewards of the Coldwater Canadiana Heritage Museum, First Nation activists camping in front of the museum have agreed to leave the site as of Friday.

On Sunday, an OPP liaison team met with the growing group after museum stewards asked them to leave the property during a meeting last Wednesday.

“We came in peace, we want to leave in peace,” said Memeskwaniniisi, (who would only provide his spirit name) one of the founders of the peace camp. “I guess we are ruffling feathers in an indirect way.”

Read more: http://www.midlandfreepress.com/ArticleDisplay.aspx?e=3550872

by NationTalk on May 3, 2012423 Views

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Sockeye Run Promising in 2012 in Alberni – Alberni Valley News

Sockeye run promising in 2012 in Alberni

By Wawmeesh G. Hamilton – Alberni Valley News
Published: May 03, 2012

If the Tseshaht and Hupacasath First Nations sign the fisheries sales agreements this spring it will be a first, Hupacasath Chief Councillor Steven Tatoosh said.

“If our members give us the go-ahead then I think it will be the earliest the agreements have ever been signed,” he said. “Last year we didn’t sign until July and the fish had gone by then.”

This year, the Department of Fisheries and Oceans is predicting a sockeye run size of 700,000 with 80,000 pieces split between the two first nations.

Read more: http://www.albernivalleynews.com/news/149964795.html

by NationTalk on May 3, 2012457 Views

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Program to monitor new moms’ mental health – Leader-Post

Program to monitor new moms’ mental health

By Pamela Cowan, Leader-Post May 2, 2012

A pilot program being set up in the Indian Head and Grenfell area by the Regina Qu’Appelle Health Region will start monitoring new moms’ mental health at the end of May.

The Rural Maternal Mental Health Detection and Intervention Pilot will screen all new mothers for postpartum depression so early intervention can be provided and, if necessary, women can be referred to specialty services.

Based on last year’s birth records, public health nurses, nurse practitioners, community health nurses and other health-care providers are expected to screen 80 to 90 moms around Indian Head, Grenfell and neighbouring First Nations.

Read more: http://www.leaderpost.com/health/Program+monitor+moms+mental+health/6550553/story.html#ixzz1tjrS8Lwr

by NationTalk on May 2, 2012703 Views

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Dryden considers new First Nations school – CBC

Dryden considers new First Nations school

School board and First Nations work together to create ‘transitional’ school

CBC News Posted: May 2, 2012

School board officials are hoping Dryden will soon offer First Nations students a place to prepare for high school.

Jack McMaster, the Keewatin-Patricia District school board’s education director, said students from remote communities are, on average, two or three years behind academically.

“And any student who walks in the front door of a high school in Grade 9 — and is two to three years behind — generally doesn’t last very long in the school,” McMaster said.

Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/thunder-bay/story/2012/05/02/tby-dryden-transition-school.html

by NationTalk on May 2, 2012651 Views

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Family Regalia Now Part of History – Vancouver Courier

Family regalia now part of history

BY SANDRA THOMAS, VANCOUVER COURIER MAY 2, 2012

After slipping off her fitted, black-leather bomber jacket, Yvonne Godkin pulled a handmade, wool button blanket embroidered with a large thunderbird across the back, over her shoulders and wrapped it gently around her body.

She then carefully placed a cedar head ring atop her long dark hair before showing off the completed look to the aunts and cousins crowded around her at the Museum of Anthropology at the University of B.C., many with camera in hand.

An emotional Godkin told me later that this was the first time she’d ever touched the First Nations regalia that once belonged to her grandmother Mabel Stanley, who died in 1978. On Monday afternoon, Stanley’s family members were invited to try on the blanket and headdress for the first, and last, time before it became part of MOA’s permanent collection. The cape and headdress belong to a collection of 24 pieces, which have been on loan to the MOA for almost 30 years.

Read more: http://www.vancourier.com/travel/Family+regalia+part+history/6551467/story.html#ixzz1tjHvlayM

by NationTalk on May 2, 2012545 Views

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Nixing Native Spirituality ‘Outrageous,’ Atleo Says – Postmedia News

Nixing native spirituality ‘outrageous,’ Atleo says

Mine proponent fears pro-aboriginal bias

POSTMEDIA NEWS MAY 2, 2012

The bid by a Vancouver company to eliminate consideration of native spirituality and prohibit aboriginal children’s plays at a federal environmental review hearing is “completely outrageous” and runs counter to the direction of many companies seeking to work with First Nations, Assembly of First Nations National Chief Shawn Atleo says.

Atleo reacted Tuesday to the disclosure of a letter sent by Taseko Mines Ltd. to Environment Minister Peter Kent in November that called for measures to eliminate possible pro-aboriginal bias in a pending review of the company’s gold-copper mine in the B.C. interior.

“The actions of the company are completely outrageous,” said Atleo. “I know increasingly companies are ‘getting’ the need to recognize and respect First Nations rights and title.”

Read more: http://www.timescolonist.com/life/Nixing+native+spirituality+outrageous+Atleo+says/6552246/story.html#ixzz1tjHTmUml

by NationTalk on May 2, 2012545 Views

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Group Worried for City Kids – Leader-Post

Group worried for city kids

BY EMMA GRANEY, LEADER-POST MAY 2, 2012

The closure of community schools must be addressed to close the widening gap between aboriginal and non-aboriginal students in Regina.

The discussion came up at Tuesday night’s Real Renewal meeting – the Regina organization formed in 2007 in response to planned school closures.

“You can’t divorce community schools from the issue of First Nations and Metis education, they’re absolutely integrated,” retired teacher and Real Renewal member Rick Hesch said during the meeting.

Read more: http://www.leaderpost.com/life/Group+worried+city+kids/6550532/story.html#ixzz1tjHA5J1F

by NationTalk on May 2, 2012403 Views

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Manitoba Chiefs Blame Governments for Alleged Flood Money Abuses – Winnipeg Free Press

Manitoba chiefs blame governments for alleged flood money abuses

By Kevin Rollason, Winnipeg Free Press May 2, 2012

BROKENHEAD FIRST NATION, Man. — Manitoba’s aboriginal leaders are going on the offensive days after both the federal and provincial governments lobbed allegations of financial abuses of compensation in the wake of last year’s flood.

Grand Chief Derek Nepinak of the Assembly of Manitoba Chiefs, Grand Chief Morris J. Shannacappo of the Southern Chiefs Organization, Bill Traverse, regional chief of the Assembly of First Nations and Chief Glen Hudson of Peguis First Nation joined together to point the finger of blame for flooding and flood compensation back at the two levels of government.

The four said it wasn’t the fault of aboriginal people that the provincial government flooded several reserves in the Interlake region north of Winnipeg when it allowed the diversion of more water into Lake Manitoba last year to minimize flood damage in communities downstream on the Assiniboine River, including Winnipeg.

Read more: http://www.globalwinnipeg.com/Manitoba+chiefs+blame+governments+alleged+flood+money+abuses/6550353/story.html#ixzz1tjGobBar

by NationTalk on May 2, 2012439 Views

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TFN Wraps Up First Legislature – Delta Optimist

TFN wraps up first legislature

Chief Kim Baird elated at what’s been accomplished after starting from scratch in a post-treaty world

BY SANDOR GYARMATI, THE DELTA OPTIMIST MAY 2, 2012

The first full cycle of the Tsawwassen First Nation’s self-government has been a highly productive one, but there’s still much to be done.

In an interview with the Optimist, TFN Chief Kim Baird expressed elation with the job done by her First Nation’s first post-treaty legislature, which has been operating under the unfamiliar territory of self-governance.

“It’s been daunting because we’ve had to create brand new policies and procedures for a brand new governance structure. Now that we’re working our way through it, we have an annual reporting cycle that we’re constantly refining as well, but at least now we’re getting to the point where we’re refining things,” Baird said.

Read more: http://www.delta-optimist.com/business/wraps+first+legislature/6551649/story.html#ixzz1tjGR4tXY

by NationTalk on May 2, 2012387 Views

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Women’s Rights Activists Laud UN Ruling Against N.W.T. Government – CBC News

Women’s rights activists laud UN ruling against N.W.T. government

Ruling seen to strengthen legal rights for aboriginal women

CBC News Posted: May 2, 2012

Women’s rights activists are calling a recent United Nations ruling against the Northwest Territories government a victory for aboriginal women across the country.

A UN committee ruled the territorial housing corporation discriminated against Cecilia Kell when they let her non-aboriginal, abusive husband claim their Behchoko. N.W.T., home.

When Kell filed court action against her partner and the government, her case was dismissed because she couldn’t pay legal fees.

Kell’s longtime friend Arlene Hache said it’s been a long road, but both women got the ruling they had been looking for.

Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/north/story/2012/05/01/north-housing-kell-hache-united-nations-ruling-gnwt.html

by NationTalk on May 2, 2012415 Views

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Mining Company Asks Government Not to Consider Aboriginal Spirituality in Environmental Probe – Postmedia News

Mining company asks government not to consider aboriginal spirituality in environmental probe

By Peter O’Neil, Postmedia News May 1, 2012

OTTAWA — A Vancouver company pushing the Harper government to reconsider a controversial gold-copper mining project in the B.C. Interior has privately urged Ottawa to ignore aboriginal requests to consider native “spirituality” as a factor in their determination, according to a letter the company sent to Environment Minister Peter Kent.

A new federal environmental review panel “does not have any right to attribute significance to the spirituality of a place per se,” wrote Taseko Mines Ltd. president Russell Hallbauer in a letter obtained under the Access to Information Act and provided to the Vancouver Sun by B.C. independent provincial representative Bob Simpson.

Taseko, which failed in its 2010 bid to get federal approval after a “scathing” federal review, also asked Ottawa to not permit aboriginal prayer ceremonies at pending hearings on the revised proposal.

Read more: http://www.canada.com/technology/Mining+company+asks+government+consider+aboriginal+spirituality+environmental+probe/6543042/story.html#ixzz1tjFaW9Dy

by NationTalk on May 2, 2012449 Views

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