S Mainstream Aboriginal Related News

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Northwest Territories Voters Go to the Polls in Crucial Election – The Globe and Mail

Northwest Territories voters go to the polls in crucial election

BOB WEBER
The Canadian Press
Published Monday, Oct. 03, 2011

Voters in the Northwest Territories go to the polls Monday in an election crucial to a bid for province-like powers.

The new government will have to tackle a proposed deal with Ottawa to give the territory control over its own land and resources – and the rich royalties they generate.

The agreement took years of talks and is widely supported in Yellowknife and the business community.

Read more: http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/politics/provincial-elections/northwest-territories-voters-go-to-the-polls-in-crucial-election/article2188476/

by NationTalk on October 3, 2011448 Views

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Province Backs Off Voter ID – The StarPhoenix

Province backs off voter ID

Chiefs allowed to vouch

By Jason Warick, The StarPhoenix October 3, 2011

A major barrier has just been removed for First Nations people wanting to vote in this fall’s provincial election, says the chief of Saskatchewan’s largest First Nation.

“It’s great they’ve agreed to make this change,” Lac La Ronge Chief Tammy Cook-Searson said in an interview Sunday evening.

“I’m not for or against any party. It’s a matter of getting people out to vote. We don’t need barriers and this was a simple fix.”

Read more: http://www.leaderpost.com/news/Province+backs+voter/5491871/story.html#ixzz1ZktIkf3o

by NationTalk on October 3, 2011544 Views

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Nashville’s Tootoo a changed man – National Post

Nashville’s Tootoo a changed man

Postmedia News Oct 2, 2011
By Ed Tait

WINNIPEG — Jordin Tootoo had to know the questions were coming. And deep down he most certainly understands that the whispers will continue and the cynics will remain unconvinced that all is right in his world again.

But that matters little to the 28-year-old Nashville Predators’ winger, born in Churchill, Man., raised in Rankin Inlet, Nunavut. Yes, there he stood in front of a media scrum following Friday’s morning skate ready and willing to talk about his past demons and detail how the dark cloud that once hovered over his career has been replaced by a bright, blue sky.

“There comes a point in life where you have to take a few steps back and re-evaluate your whole situation,” said Tootoo. “That’s what I chose to do. Now each and every day brings a new task and when you set goals you want to do the best you can every day to achieve them.

Read more: http://sports.nationalpost.com/2011/10/02/nashvilles-tootoo-a-changed-man/

by NationTalk on October 3, 2011546 Views

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Grand Chief: ‘Third-world’ conditions should be election issue in Manitoba – thechronicleherald.ca

Grand Chief: ‘Third-world’ conditions should be election issue in Manitoba

Sun, Oct 2

WINNIPEG (CP) — One of Manitoba’s aboriginal leaders says the lack of clean running water and the third-world living conditions of Manitoba’s First Nations should be a central issue in the provincial election.

Grand Chief David Harper, who repre­sents the province’s northern First Nations, said many communities in the northeast have been neglected for years.

“Here we are sitting in northeastern Manitoba and it’s in a third-world state,” he said in a recent interview. “There is a lack of running water, no running water. This coming winter, some kids and elders in that area, will not have any clean drinking water. Yet every flu season, it seems to happen that people are dying.”

Read more: http://thechronicleherald.ca/Canada/9022221.html

by NationTalk on October 3, 2011502 Views

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‘Unprecedented’ ozone hole opens over Canadian Arctic – National Post

‘Unprecedented’ ozone hole opens over Canadian Arctic

Postmedia News Oct 2, 2011
By Margaret Munro

A massive Arctic ozone hole opened up over the Northern Hemisphere for the first time this year, an international research team reported Sunday.

The hole covered two million square kilometres — about twice the size of Ontario — and allowed high levels of harmful ultraviolet radiation to hit large swaths of northern Canada, Europe and Russia this spring, the 29 scientists say.

The discovery of the “unprecedented” hole comes as the Canadian government is moving to cut its ozone monitoring network.

Read more: http://news.nationalpost.com/2011/10/02/unprecedented-ozone-hole-opens-over-canadian-arctic/

by NationTalk on October 3, 2011402 Views

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6 NWT ridings to watch – CBC.ca

6 N.W.T. ridings to watch
Some of the territory’s closest and most interesting races

CBC News Posted: Oct 2, 2011

There are 19 ridings in the Northwest Territories, and three of them are acclaimed. CBC North breaks down the most interesting races from around the territory.

Thebacha
Monfwi
Inuvik Boot Lake
Yellowknife Centre
Yellowknife Frame Lake
Hay River South

Thebacha

This riding includes the town of Fort Smith, Smith Landing First Nation and the Salt River Reserve.

Three strong candidates are vying for the seat and they are the same ones as in 2007. Incumbent Michael Miltenberger’s challengers are former Fort Smith Mayor Peter Martselos and Jeannie Marie-Jewell, who served as MLA for the riding from 1987-1995. Marie-Jewell was also the first female Speaker of the Legislative Assembly in 1993.

Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nwtvotes2011/story/2011/10/02/north-nwt-ridings-to-watch.html

by NationTalk on October 3, 2011522 Views

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How the O’Learys and 20,000 other Newfoundlanders were declared Mi’kmaq – National Post

How the O’Learys and 20,000 other Newfoundlanders were declared Mi’kmaq

Oct 1, 2011

With each day that passes, there are more and more registered Indians in Newfoundland. Not because of migration. Not because of an impressive birth rate. But because thousands of people are discovering, or declaring for the first time, that they are Mi’kmaw descendants — and that they are now eligible for membership in a band officially created this week, and for the federal benefits that flow from it.

Newfoundland, once deemed by a famous Irishman as the most Irish place outside Ireland, and the place where the Beothuk aboriginal people were essentially exterminated, is expected to host Canada’s largest First Nations band and could soon have more self-identified aboriginals than all the other Atlantic provinces combined.

The province was the last to join Confederation, and because it never adopted the Indian Act, aboriginals in Newfoundland and Labrador have been fighting for federal recognition for decades. The creation of the Qalipu Mi’kmaq First Nation band this week is the culmination of that fight.

Read more: http://news.nationalpost.com/2011/10/01/how-the-o%E2%80%99learys-and-20000-other-newfoundlanders-were-declared-mi%E2%80%99kmaq/

by NationTalk on October 3, 2011757 Views

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Elders bring cultural wisdom to SFU campuses – Vancouver Sun

Elders bring cultural wisdom to SFU campuses

Aboriginal program designed to improve recruitment, retention and participation in student life

By MEDHA, Vancouver Sun October 2, 2011

First nations elders are bringing their cultural wisdom, expertise, and life experience to campus as part of a new program launched by Simon Fraser University.

“Elders are a key cornerstone of first nations societies. Aboriginal people have always had the tradition of elders guiding their societies,” said William Lindsay, director, Office for Aboriginal Peoples at SFU. “This is sort of a continuation of that.”

The elders program was recommended by SFU’s aboriginal strategic plan and the idea is to draw upon that tradition to help today’s students, faculty and staff deal with modern life,” said Lindsay.

Read more: http://www.vancouversun.com/life/Elders+bring+cultural+wisdom+campuses/5491590/story.html#ixzz1ZgQtaIr4

by NationTalk on October 3, 2011472 Views

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Critics doubt oilsands monitoring will lessen impact on environment – Winnipeg Free Press

Critics doubt oilsands monitoring will lessen impact on environment

By: Bob Weber, The Canadian Press
Posted: 10/2/2011

EDMONTON – Don’t get him wrong.

Simon Dyer of The Pembina Institute, a longtime critic of Alberta’s oilsands environmental management, is pleased as punch that Ottawa and Edmonton are finally working together to come up with a scientifically defensible plan to track the impact of mega-developments.

He’s just not sure it’ll make any difference.

“It’s good that the government is talking about environmental limits,” he says. “Unfortunately, they’ve been talking about this (for) a decade and it’s still all rhetoric.”

Read more: http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/business/breakingnews/critics-doubt-oilsands-monitoring-will-lessen-impact-on-environment-130933123.html

by NationTalk on October 3, 2011436 Views

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Mine CEOs want closed-door meetings with council candidates – kamloopsnews.ca

Mine CEOs want closed-door meetings with council candidates

October 2, 2011
By JASON HEWLETT
Daily News Staff Reporter

The powers that be behind the proposed KGHM Ajax mine have requested one-on-one closed-door meetings with new and incumbent City council candidates, a move opponents believe is undemocratic.

The meetings will take place some time between Oct. 4-14, when KGHM CEO Marcin Mostowy and Abacus CEO Jim Excell are scheduled to visit the city.

Ruth Madsen, a member of the Kamloops Area Prevention Association, said today first-time council candidate Donovan Cavers contacted her group after a secretary from KGHM Ajax approached him last week

Read more: http://www.kamloopsnews.ca/article/20111002/KAMLOOPS0101/310029999/-1/kamloops01/mine-ceos-want-closed-door-meetings-with-council-candidates

by NationTalk on October 3, 2011449 Views

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Strong North, strong Canada – Toronto Star

Strong North, strong Canada

Anne Golden and
David Stewart-Patterson

The fact that getting a morning double-double costs about 35 per cent more in Iqaluit than in Mississauga is not exactly top of mind for traffic-bound commuters in the GTA. Canada’s North looms large in our national imagination, but not in the daily lives of most Canadians.

What happens in the North, however, matters to all of us. How our far-flung northern communities develop will have a real impact on the economic future of our country, and all of us need a better understanding of the forces at work.

The galloping growth of emerging economies like China and India has made the economic opportunities obvious. The world is hungry for Canada’s resources, and much of what we have — gold, silver, copper, zinc, diamonds, oil and gas — is to be found in our vast northern spaces.

Read more: http://www.thestar.com/opinion/editorialopinion/article/1062932–strong-north-strong-canada

by NationTalk on October 3, 2011467 Views

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School board shows off aboriginal programs – NorthernLife.ca

School board shows off aboriginal programs

By: Sudbury Northern Life Staff

Visitors from the Dufferin-Peel Catholic District School Board were in Greater Sudbury Sept. 29 to learn about the inclusion of aboriginal culture at Sudbury Catholic District School Board schools.

Dufferin-Peel’s director of education John Kostoff, superintendent Clara Pitoscia and general manager of communications and media relations Bruce Campbell visited with administration at the Sudbury Catholic District School Board.

The group visited three schools — St. Charles College, St. David Catholic Elementary School and St. Benedict Catholic Secondary School.

Read more: http://www.northernlife.ca/news/lifestyle/2011/10/01-aboriginal-culture-schools-sudbury.aspx

by NationTalk on October 3, 2011541 Views

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First Nations groups calling for independent probe into incident – The Province

First Nations groups calling for independent probe into incident

By Sean Sullivan, The Province September 30, 2011

Four aboriginal groups are calling on the public safety minister to appoint an independent investigator into the alleged assault of a girl by RCMP officers in Williams Lake.

The First Nations Summit, the Union of B.C. Indian Chiefs, the B.C. Assembly of First Nations and the Native Courtworker and Counselling Association of B.C. say the probe into 17-year-old Jamie Haller’s complaint shouldn’t be handled by police.

Jamie said she was repeatedly punched in the face by an RCMP officer Sept. 10 while handcuffed in the back of a police cruiser.

Read more: http://www.theprovince.com/news/First+Nations+groups+calling+independent+probe+into+incident/5481746/story.html#ixzz1ZSYCBM56

by NationTalk on September 30, 2011574 Views

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Role-model effect boosts aboriginal employment: economist – CBC.ca

Role-model effect boosts aboriginal employment: economist

CBC News Posted: Sep 29, 2011

While aboriginal employment has long lagged in Saskatchewan as a whole, the good news is there is a “role-model effect” that kicks in when First Nations and Métis people get back into the workforce, a Saskatoon economist says.

According to the University of Saskatchewan’s Eric Howe, the employment rate of aboriginal people in August — 60.3 per cent of those 15 and over — was the highest since 2004, when the statistics first started to be tracked.

Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/saskatchewan/story/2011/09/29/sk-aboriginal-employment-1109.html

by NationTalk on September 30, 2011664 Views

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Former PM devotes time and money to aboriginal priorities – Vancouver Sun

Former PM devotes time and money to aboriginal priorities

Paul Martin is the first recipient of the Award for Excellence in Aboriginal Relations for his long history of involvement in native issues

By Don Cayo, Vancouver Sun September 30, 2011

What does a guy do with himself at the end of a successful career in both business and politics?

If you think the answer’s predictable – a retired big shot does whatever he wants – you’re no doubt right. But how former prime minister Paul Martin chooses to spend his time in retirement has nothing to do with fishing poles or rocking chairs.

For the last five years Martin, now 73, has been investing massive amounts of both his energy and his wealth – estimated at $225 million back when he was still prime minister – into his twin passions for aboriginal education and entrepreneurship. Then, as time permits, the legendary former finance minister who slew Canada’s chronic deficit, trots the globe. He works on issues as diverse as saving rich countries from their spendthrift ways and saving the Congo Basin rainforest from people so poor they’ll risk long-term sustainability to meet life-and-death shortterm needs.

Read more: http://www.vancouversun.com/business/Former+devotes+time+money+aboriginal+priorities/5482204/story.html

by NationTalk on September 30, 2011520 Views

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Aboriginal jury roll problem hampers courts – CBC.ca

Aboriginal jury roll problem hampers courts
Lack of aboriginal representation on jury rolls delays trials and inquests

CBC News Posted: Sep 30, 2011

A single complaint about a lack of aboriginal representation on jury rolls has led to a policy change that is disrupting the court system in Thunder Bay, Ont., CBC News has learned.

The change has put jury trials and inquests in the district on hold for months. The province used to rely on band lists from First Nations to compile jury rolls, but but the federal government has stopped supplying those lists.

Documents obtained by CBC Radio under access to information show the change in federal policy came after one person complained about privacy concerns.

Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/thunder-bay/story/2011/09/30/tby-firstnations-jury.html

by NationTalk on September 30, 2011693 Views

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Aboriginal community prepares for celebration – NorthernLife.ca

Aboriginal community prepares for celebration

Sep 30, 2011
By: Sudbury Northern Life Staff

The fourth annual Northern Aboriginal Festival will take place at the Sudbury Community Arena Oct. 1-2.

The event is co-hosted by Cambrian College, Laurentian University, Collège Boréal, and the City of Greater Sudbury.

The festival, which is open to the entire community, will showcase and celebrate many forms of aboriginal culture. It will include a pow-wow and vendors’ market, which will feature food, crafts, artisans and information kiosks.

Read more: http://www.northernlife.ca/news/localNews/2011/09/30-aboriginal-festival-celebration-sudbury.aspx

by NationTalk on September 30, 2011492 Views

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Meeting with Harper expected soon, AFN chief says – Globe and Mail

Meeting with Harper expected soon, AFN chief says

gloria galloway
OTTAWA— From Thursday’s Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, Sep. 29, 2011

The head of Canada’s largest aboriginal group says a long-awaited meeting between native leaders and Prime Minister Stephen Harper could take place within months and will be used to press for more autonomy and fairer funding for first nations.

Shawn Atleo, the national chief of the Assembly of First Nations, said in a telephone interview on Wednesday that his group has been speaking with the Prime Minister’s Office “and there are signals of a willingness to work on a date for this winter, December or January.”

The relationship between first nations and the Crown needs to be reset, Mr. Atleo said. “I certainly would have liked to have seen this first nations-Crown gathering happen earlier,” he said.

Read more: http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/politics/meeting-with-harper-expected-soon-afn-chief-says/article2183851/?from=sec431

by NationTalk on September 29, 2011462 Views

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Native couples’ property rights revisited – Vancouver Sun

Native couples’ property rights revisited

By Peter O’Neil, Vancouver Sun September 29, 2011

The federal government launched a new bid Wednesday to provide onreserve aboriginal couples the same matrimonial property rights as other Canadians.

The legislative void, first highlighted in a 1985 Supreme Court of Canada decision involving a separating couple from the Westbank First Nation near Kelowna, has been denounced on human rights grounds by a Canadian Senate committee and the United Nations.

But attempts by Conservative governments to modernize the laws have run into opposition from first nations groups and opposition MPs, resulting in three separate bills dying on the order paper between 2006 and 2011.

Read more: http://www.vancouversun.com/news/Native+couples+property+rights+revisited/5475665/story.html#ixzz1ZMWbN9Ci

by NationTalk on September 29, 2011561 Views

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Alberta to probe aboriginal health near oilsands – CBC.ca

Alberta to probe aboriginal health near oilsands

CBC News Posted: Sep 29, 2011

The Alberta government has agreed to study the health of aboriginal people and their communities downstream from the province’s oilsands developments.

“Our Chief and Council, in partnership with leadership from the Fort McKay Metis Community, have expressed for quite some time now that there is a great need to conduct a health assessment study of our community,” said Raymond Powder, deputy chief of the Fort McKay First Nation.

“We need to better understand the state of our people’s health, and how the environment around us is impacting our health, not just physically, but also emotionally and spiritually.”

Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/edmonton/story/2011/09/29/edmonton-fort-mckay-health-oilsands.html

by NationTalk on September 29, 2011547 Views

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Federal panel visits B.C. in its quest to improve schooling for first nations – Vancouver Sun

Federal panel visits B.C. in its quest to improve schooling for first nations

By Janet Steffenhagen, Vancouver Sun September 29, 2011

Caroline Krause understands the struggles of aboriginal children trying to get an education.

She was principal of Grandview elementary school in the early 2000s as that small inner-city school was emerging from a troubled past that included a high failure rate for its students. She knows about the difference education can make.

Now Krause is among three members of a blue-ribbon federal panel charged with developing a blueprint for improving education in 520 band-operated schools in Canada. The panel was in Vancouver and Terrace this week meeting with first nations leaders, elders, educators, parents and students.

Read more: http://www.vancouversun.com/life/Federal+panel+visits+quest+improve+schooling+first+nations/5475638/story.html#ixzz1ZMUQVhlN

by NationTalk on September 29, 2011430 Views

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NCC urged to honour Commanda – Ottawa Citizen

NCC urged to honour Commanda

Leaders decry lack of monuments to aboriginal in region

By Mohammed Adam, Ottawa Citizen September 29, 2011

Aboriginal leaders want the federal government to rename a city landmark after the Algonquin spiritual leader William Commanda as an essential first step in recognizing the historical role of First Nations in the capital region.

At a meeting with the NCC to discuss how aboriginal peoples could be better represented in the capital, native leaders in attendance called it unacceptable that monuments celebrating English and French heritage could be found everywhere in the capital, but no statue, park or street recognized First Nations people.

They want a landmark such as Victoria Island, Wellington Street or Jacques Cartier Park renamed after Commanda, who died recently at age 97, as the first of many steps to redress the neglect of aboriginal history and heritage in the capital.

Read more: http://www.ottawacitizen.com/life/urged+honour+Commanda/5474073/story.html

by NationTalk on September 29, 2011414 Views

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Teaching aboriginal languages key to restoring pride, say residential school … – parentcentral.ca

Teaching aboriginal languages key to restoring pride, say residential school survivors

September 28, 2011
Louise Brown
EDUCATION REPORTER

Canada must fund native language and culture programs to help rebuild the sense of identity it destroyed through residential schools, said members of the aboriginal community Wednesday at Queen’s Park during a panel discussion at which several survivors broke down in tears.

“Where is the funding for language programs? Where is the funding for our at-risk youth? Where is the funding that says it’s okay to be who we are?” asked an emotional Kahsenniyo Wilson, a community organizer from Six Nations and one of several panellists asked to discuss how Canada can come to grips with abuses committed in residential schools.

Read more: http://www.parentcentral.ca/parent/education/article/1061593–teaching-aboriginal-languages-key-to-restoring-pride-say-residential-school-survivors

by NationTalk on September 29, 2011402 Views

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Native group seeks UN funds for Pickton inquiry – Canada.com

Native group seeks UN funds for Pickton inquiry

News Services September 28, 2011

The Native Women’s Association of Canada has made a last-minute appeal to the United Nations for help after it was denied funding to participate in the Missing Women inquiry, which will begin looking into the notorious Robert Pickton murders next month.

NWAC has requested a joint urgent appeal to Canada by the UN Special Rapporteurs on Violence Against Women, the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and the Independence of Judges and Lawyers.

Many of the women who have gone missing were aboriginal, the NWAC president said.

Read more: http://www.canada.com/Native+group+seeks+funds+Pickton+inquiry/5469533/story.html

by NationTalk on September 28, 2011433 Views

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Aboriginal residential school survivors share stories – Toronto Star

Aboriginal residential school survivors share stories

Louise Brown
Education Reporter

By the time it was 7-year-old Shirley Williams’s turn to be sent off to residential school, her father had had enough.

After seeing the emotional damage such schools had caused his six older children, the Ojibwa father of nine struck a deal with the local priest in Wikwemikong reserve on Manitoulin Island: Let me keep Shirley until she’s 10 and I’ll school her here at home.

And so, when she left three years later by boat for the girls school where she would spend the next eight years, her Ojibwa roots were deep enough, her identity and language strong enough they could not be stripped away no matter how hard the school would try.

Read more: http://www.thestar.com/news/article/1060676–aboriginal-residential-school-survivors-share-stories?bn=1

by NationTalk on September 28, 20111238 Views

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Fishermen sorry for confrontation with native boat – TheChronicleHerald.ca

Fishermen sorry for confrontation with native boat

By The Canadian Press
Wed, Sep 28

SYDNEY — An association representing harbour fishermen in Sydney, N.S. is apologetic about an incident that resulted in an aboriginal fishing crew being told to move their traps.

Melanie Sampson, of the Sydney Harbour Fishers Association, says the group regrets the incident, which she says is largely attributable to poor communications.

Non-native fishermen were angry the Mi’kmaq boat set traps over the weekend in the same area where they are working to relocate marine life before harbour dredging begins Saturday.

Read more: http://thechronicleherald.ca/NovaScotia/9022166.html

by NationTalk on September 28, 2011464 Views

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Treaty knowledge passed down the generations – Winnipeg Free Press

Treaty knowledge passed down the generations
New coursework to be used in grades 5 and 6

By: Staff Writer
Posted: 09/28/2011

Students across the province will get a chance to study the treaties between aboriginal people and the federal government this year.

Officials released details Tuesday morning about the learning materials, which will be available to all grades 5 and 6 teachers.

At the announcement, the nine-year-old great-great-great-granddaughter of Chief Yellowquill — the first signatory in 1871 to Treaty One — presented a copy of the document to a group of schoolchildren.

Read more: http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/local/treaty-knowledge-passed–down-the-generations-130688138.html

by NationTalk on September 28, 2011390 Views

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First Nations treaties added to school curriculum

School students across the province will be studying the treaties between Aboriginal people and the federal government this year.
In a news conference at The Forks this morning, officials released details about the learning materials, which will be available to all grade 5 and 6 teachers.

To mark the announcment, the nine-year-old great-great-great-granddaughter of Chief Yellowquill — the first signatory in 1871 to Treaty One — presented a copy of the original document to a group of school children.

http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/breakingnews/First-Nations-treaties-added-to-school-curriculum-130642693.html

by NationTalk on September 28, 2011583 Views

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Aboriginal fisherman threatened by non-natives – CBC.ca

Aboriginal fisherman threatened by non-natives

CBC News Posted: Sep 27, 2011

A fisherman from Membertou First Nation said he was frightened when non-native fishermen threatened him Monday as he was pulling lobster traps in Sydney harbour.

But John Bonham Paul said he will not be intimidated into giving up his rights.

Paul was hauling lobster traps just off North Sydney when several boats surrounded him. The non-native fishermen shouted at him and threatened to burn his boat.

Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-scotia/story/2011/09/27/ns-first-nations-lobster-fishermen.html

by NationTalk on September 28, 2011642 Views

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Aboriginal arts, culture and multi-media festival announced – Wawatay News

Aboriginal arts, culture and multi-media festival announced

Tuesday September 27, 2011

Thunder Bay is looking for the recently announced Animkii Festival to be a major attraction for people from across North America.

“The Animkii Festival will bring people from all over North America to celebrate Aboriginal arts, culture and multi-media,” said Anna Gibbon, Aboriginal liaison for the City of Thunder Bay. “It’s a tremendous opportunity for the city. Not only has this event been expanded to four days, but the community is now taking it over and will be organizing the event completely.”

Now organized by the Thunder Bay Aboriginal Arts and Heritage Group, the event will be held Oct. 13-16 at the Coliseum Building on Thunder Bay’s CLE grounds. The group has a vision to expand the event into a major cultural event for the City of Thunder Bay.

Read more: http://www.wawataynews.ca/archive/all/2011/9/27/aboriginal-arts-culture-and-multi-media-festival-announced_21880

by NationTalk on September 28, 2011776 Views

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From the classroom to the country circuit – Montreal Gazette

From the classroom to the country circuit

By John P. McLaughlin, Postmedia News September 27, 2011

To a lot of kids in Grades 9 to 11 at Sturgeon Heights Collegiate in Winnipeg, he’s Mr. Sereda, who teaches digital photography, animation and web design in his computer-science class, which is cool enough. But he’s also Jerry Sereda, country music dude. Country’s a big deal in Winnipeg, and that easily doubles Sereda’s coolness factor.

This month marks his sixth year of teaching, and he loves it. And during summer and time off, when the teens are away doing what teens do, 28-year-old Sereda is lining up and playing gigs all over the area, surfing off his radio airplay. Commendably, he has yet to play a bar.

And to think it almost wasn’t to be. Initially, Sereda figured his way into the business was going to be via talent contests, and he entered the first Canadian Idol in 2003. Singing his two cover songs less like an original and more karaoke, he didn’t make it out of Winnipeg.

Read more: http://www.theprovince.com/entertainment/From+classroom+country+circuit/5464489/story.html#ixzz1ZCs7tNh2

by NationTalk on September 28, 2011551 Views

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Hundreds join protest of Alberta’s oilsands – Calgary Herald

Hundreds join protest of Alberta’s oilsands

Activists in Ottawa, Calgary denounce harm to environment

By Peter O’Neil, Calgary Herald; With Files From Deborah Tetley, Calgary Herald September 27, 2011

Although it lacked the celebrity sizzle of U.S. demonstrations, hundreds of people protested Alberta’s oilsands development Monday on Parliament Hill in Ottawa.

About 500 mostly youthful protesters listened as Council of Canadians chairwoman Maude Barlow and aboriginal leaders from B.C. and Alberta denounced the environmental impact of the industry and a proposed pipeline.

“Shut down – tarsands!” the protesters chanted at one point before groups locked arms and climbed over a security fence, where they were met by RCMP officers who cuffed them and led them away.

Read more: http://www.calgaryherald.com/business/Hundreds+join+protest+Alberta+oilsands/5463073/story.html#ixzz1ZCqEhx7U

by NationTalk on September 28, 2011598 Views

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Official status for Qalipu Mi’kmaq – The Telegram

Official status for Qalipu Mi’kmaq

Published on September 27, 2011

More than 20,000 people within Newfoundland and Labrador have been recognized by the Canadian government with standing under the Indian Act. They are members of the Qalipu (pronounced Hal-lay-boo) Mi’kmaq First Nation Band.

The announcement was made Monday morning, by way of a joint news release from federal Minister of Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development John Duncan, Minister of Intergovernmental Affairs Peter Penashue and interim Qalipu Mi’kmaq First Nation Band Chief Brendan Sheppard.

Read more: http://www.thetelegram.com/News/Local/2011-09-27/article-2760891/Official-status-for-Qalipu-Mi%26rsquo%3Bkmaq-/1

by NationTalk on September 28, 20111054 Views

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Teepee-inspired solar house gets attention – Calgary Herald

Teepee-inspired solar house gets attention

Home uses 70% less energy than Alberta average

By Meghan Potkins, Calgary Herald September 27, 2011

After days of cloudy skies, the prayers of a group of Calgary students competing in an international design competition were answered as skies cleared over Washington, D.C., and the sun shone on their solar-powered house.

The team of students from the University of Calgary are in the U.S. capital this week representing Canada in the U.S. Department of Energy’s Solar Decathlon contest.

Held every two years, the competition challenges teams from all over the world to design solar-powered houses. And this year, Team Canada’s entry has received more attention than any other team, attracting more than 7,000 visitors in just four days, including Canadian Ambassador Gary Doer, who toured the site Friday.

Read more: http://www.calgaryherald.com/technology/Teepee+inspired+solar+house+gets+attention/5463127/story.html

by NationTalk on September 28, 2011568 Views

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Saskatchewan First Nations rally at legislature – CBC News

Saskatchewan First Nations rally at legislature

CBC News Posted: Sep 26, 2011

Saskatchewan First Nation members rallied outside the provincial legislature on Monday, demanding that their treaty rights be fully honoured.

An estimated 1,000 people marched to the front steps of the legislature in Regina for the First Nations Provincial Day of Action, organized by the Federation of Saskatchewan Indian Nations.

First Nation leaders and others at the event called on governments to respect their treaty rights and work with First Nations to implement those treaties.

Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/saskatchewan/story/2011/09/26/sask-first-nations-protest.html

by NationTalk on September 28, 2011880 Views

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Keystone pipeline protest nets 117 arrests on Hill – CBC News

Keystone pipeline protest nets 117 arrests on Hill

CBC News Posted: Sep 26, 2011

More than 100 protesters were arrested Monday after trying to enter the House of Commons during a demonstration on Parliament Hill against a proposed oilsands pipeline project.

Hundreds of people flocked to the Hill to voice their displeasure with TransCanada’s Keystone XL pipeline project, a $7-billion plan to ship crude oil from Alberta to Texas.

Greenpeace Canada spokesman Peter McHugh promoted the event as “a historic mass act of civil disobedience over the tarsands,” which also included members from the Council of Canadians.

Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/ottawa/story/2011/09/26/ottawa-oilsands-protest-parliament-hill.html

by NationTalk on September 28, 2011610 Views

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Is it time for an Aboriginal Parliament? – Vancouver Observer

Is it time for an Aboriginal Parliament?

Alex Sangha Posted: Sep 25th, 2011

The federal government has failed miserably in improving outcomes for our Aboriginal ancestors, which includes the First Nations, Metis, and Inuit peoples. Many First Nations living on reserves have lower health and education outcomes and higher rates of poverty and unemployment than the general Canadian population. The socio-economic crisis goes even deeper than that. There is significant issues around social exclusion and communities at risk. The Indian Act has turned many status Indians into wards of the state. The Inuit seemed to have done much better. They largely govern themselves with the creation of the federal territory of Nunavut.

The time has come for the rest of the Aboriginal people of this country to have control over their own political destiny. In 1996, the Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples recommended the creation of an Aboriginal Parliament or House of First Peoples. This is an idea worth further examination for several reasons:

Read more: http://www.vancouverobserver.com/suburbanpundit/2011/09/25/it-time-aboriginal-parliament

by NationTalk on September 26, 2011545 Views

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Police arrest oil-sands protesters on Parliament Hill – Canadian Press

Police arrest oil-sands protesters on Parliament Hill

Ottawa— The Canadian Press
Published Monday, Sep. 26, 2011

Police quietly arrested dozens of protesters who crossed a barricade in front of the Peace Tower on Monday.

Several hundred people milled in front of police barriers on the Parliament Hill lawn as a protest against the Keystone XL pipeline.

The arrests came as orderly lines of about six or seven at a time approached the first of the barricades, a waist-high fence. One by one, they used a small stool to step across and then sat on the lawn, while police interviewed them. They were led away at intervals.

Read more: http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/politics/police-arrest-oil-sands-protesters-on-parliament-hill/article2180350/?utm_medium=Feeds%3A%20RSS%2FAtom&utm_source=Energy%20&%20Resources&utm_content=2180350

by NationTalk on September 26, 2011527 Views

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The end of the old North – National Post

The end of the old North

Joe O’Connor, National Post · Sept. 24, 2011

Strangers who met him, for the first time, often described Father Guy Mary-Rousselière as being aloof, detached and a little bit lost in his own inner-self.

A gangly limbed Roman Catholic priest, with a lean and upright bearing, Father Mary’s quiet reserve, like the priest’s collar he wore, was partly a disguise. The outer costume of a devoutly religious, yet also profoundly progressive man, who was living elbow to elbow with an Inuit culture dynamically different from the Western one in which the good Father, from Le Mans, France, was raised.

Father Mary lived and worked in Pond Inlet, and parts thereabout in the Central and Eastern Canadian Arctic, from the 1940s until his death, at age 81, in 1994.

Read more: http://www.nationalpost.com/news/North/5452188/story.html

by NationTalk on September 26, 2011511 Views

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Mentorship for Aboriginal youth – National Post

Mentorship for Aboriginal youth

Christine Dobby Sep 26, 2011

Since leaving public life in 2006, former Canadian prime minister Paul Martin has dedicated time and money to the promotion of education and prosperity in Aboriginal communities. The following is an edited transcript of Mr. Martin speaking with the Financial Post’s Christine Dobby.

Q What sparked your interest in working with Aboriginal youth?

A It really started when I was a teenager. I worked a number of summers as a deckhand north of 60 on the Mackenzie River and made friends with members of the First Nation, the Metis Nation and the Inuit. The fundamental difference that struck me then is that at that age you’re full of hope and excitement — for the guys I grew up with in Windsor, Ont., life was just one great prospective of excitement looking ahead — and a lot of the young guys I worked with were every bit as smart and hardworking as I was. They just didn’t have that same hope because life didn’t have those same opportunities. That stayed with me in my business life. It was an involvement I had when I was in business, it became a very important involvement when I became Prime Minister, and I just continued with it.

Read more: http://business.financialpost.com/2011/09/26/mentorship-for-aboriginal-youth/

by NationTalk on September 26, 2011511 Views

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Coming Down The Pipeline – – Media Coop

COMING DOWN THE PIPELINE
Governments and corporations misrepresent the facts on oil sands

September 24, 2011
by Adam Kostrich

Proposed extensions to the existing network of trans-continental oil pipelines has raised public concern in Canada and the US over the potential environmental impact. But for the most part governments and mainstream media outlets have ignored public opposition to the construction of TransCanada’s Keystone XL pipeline, which would facilitate a direct link between Alberta’s oil sands and refineries in the Texas Gulf coast.

Major pipelines already exist between Canada and the US; the function of the Keystone XL would be to pave the way for extensive investment in the future development of Alberta’s oil sands. The Harper government supports the construction of the Keystone XL and other pipelines on the grounds that oil sands development will bolster American energy security and provide a boost to the North American economy in the form of job creation.

Read more: http://www.mediacoop.ca/story/coming-down-pipeline/8221

by NationTalk on September 26, 2011458 Views

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Dreaming of a new Point Douglas – Winnipeg Free Press

Dreaming of a new Point DouglasMétis federation proposes area development

By: Murray McNeill
Posted: 09/26/2011

A $35-million-to-$45-million-plus development project is in the works that would help to change the face of Winnipeg’s historic Point Douglas area.

The economic development arm of the Manitoba Metis Federation — the Metis Economic Development Organization — is the driving force behind the proposed development, which could get underway early next year.

MEDO CEO Blake Russell said the first phase of the three-phase development will be paid for with debt financing that MEDO is close to completing.

Read more: http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/opinion/columnists/dreaming-of-a-new-point-douglas-130549048.html

by NationTalk on September 26, 2011637 Views

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Celebrating Grandfather Commanda, the Morning Star – Media Coop

Celebrating Grandfather Commanda, the Morning Star

by Erin Cummings
September 24, 2011

A few nights ago my neighbour and I climbed up onto his roof. We fondly reminisced under the stars about the recently departed William Commanda, his contribution to our world, and the beauty of his vigil and funeral service. My neighbour grew up in Kitigan Zibi, a First Nations community 130 kilometres north of Gatineau, during the time that Commanda served as chief. He had warm memories to share. Yet, Commanda’s profound impact on those who knew him personally is just a small grain of sand in the larger picture of his lifelong work toward a peaceful, just, and sustainable world. Named Ojigkwanong, or Morning Star, Commanda lived a life dedicated to learning and teaching. Described as a man who was humorous, kind, intelligent, dignified, and open, Commanda lived the changes he wished to see.

Read more: http://www.mediacoop.ca/story/celebrating-grandfather-commanda-morning-star/8220

by NationTalk on September 26, 2011465 Views

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Metis in B.C. to share more health data with province – Canadian Press

Metis in B.C. to share more health data with province

By: The Canadian Press
Posted: 09/24/2011

ABBOTSFORD, B.C. – The province will soon gain a better understanding of the health status of Metis people living in B.C. after the signing today of an information-sharing agreement.

The agreement means information from consenting Metis people that’s stored in existing databases will be shared with the Health Ministry.

Staff will analyze specific health outcomes and chronic diseases in relation to the demographic and use it to develop targeted programs.

Read more: http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/arts-and-life/life/health/metis-in-bc-to-share-more-health-data-with-province-130509553.html

by NationTalk on September 26, 2011465 Views

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On The Road Again – Fourth annual Walk4Justice highlights violence against women – Media Coop

ON THE ROAD AGAIN
Fourth annual Walk4Justice highlights violence against women

by Erin Cummings with files from Andy Crosby →Ottawa Working Group of the Media Co-op

On June 21, 2011, a group of dedicated women, men and children stepped out into the streets of Vancouver and began a cross-country walk that will span over 4,000 km and take nearly three months to complete. This summer’s trek from Vancouver, Coast Salish territory, to Ottawa, Algonquin territory, marks the fourth annual Walk4Justice.

“Our purpose is to raise awareness about the missing and murdered women across Canada,” says Walk4Justice co-founder Gladys Radek. “And we’re going to be asking Stephen Harper to either step up or step down.”

Read more: http://www.mediacoop.ca/story/road-again/8219

by NationTalk on September 26, 2011424 Views

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Missing Women’s Commission flounders – The Dominion

Missing Women’s Commission Flounders

Groups looking elsewhere for answers to murder, disappearance of Aboriginal women

by Angela Sterritt
The Dominion – http://www.dominionpaper.ca
September 26, 2011

Vancouver—Just weeks before the BC Missing Women Commission of Inquiry is set to begin, concerns and questions continue to be raised by the groups representing Aboriginal, women’s and sex-trade worker’s groups. More are walking away from what appears to be a crumbling process.

“We are calling for a National Inquiry,” says Jeannette Corbiere Lavell, president of the Native Women’s Association of Canada (NWAC). “This is a human rights violation: we are being denied the basic right to participate in a decision-making process that effects us,” she said. NWAC pulled out of the commission when it was announced that none of the organizations provided standing at the inquiry would be afforded legal representation.

Read more: http://www.dominionpaper.ca/articles/4182

by NationTalk on September 26, 2011503 Views

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Sex-ed workshop targets Native communities – CBC News

Sex-ed workshop targets Native communities

CBC News Posted: Sep 26, 2011

A P.E.I. man is working with a Nova Scotia group to provide information on sexually transmitted infections to First Nation communities in the Maritimes.

Recent statistics show the rate of some STIs is up among all people on the Island, and Native people are not immune to that trend.

“We teach among our own aboriginal communities,” said workshop leader Leslie Labobe.

“Forty years ago when people would never talk about sexual abuse or assaults, things were pushed underneath the carpet. Now this is where we need to take the lead and talk about STIs and get the information to our kids, because this is something we cannot hide.”

Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/prince-edward-island/story/2011/09/26/pei-sex-education-native-584.html

by NationTalk on September 26, 2011406 Views

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The North’s top cops meet in Iqaluit in search of solutions – National Post

The North’s top cops meet in Iqaluit in search of solutions

Tristin Hopper Sep 25, 2011

More than half of all Alaskan women have been sexually assaulted. Greenlanders may use the same currency as Denmark, but they sometimes experience murder rates that are 100 times higher. Canada’s Northern territories have fewer residents than a mid-sized Toronto suburb, yet they rarely go a year without a multiple homicide or a police shoot out.

Last week, for the first time ever, top cops from Greenland, Alaska and the Canadian North convened in Iqaluit to “talk shop” on keeping the peace in one of continent’s most crime-ridden regions.

“When you start seeing the same things over and over again, you have to look at different approaches,” said Superintendent Steve McVarnock, commanding officer for the Nunavut RCMP.

Read more: http://news.nationalpost.com/2011/09/25/the-norths-top-cops-meet-in-iqaluit-in-search-of-solutions/

by NationTalk on September 26, 2011369 Views

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Aboriginal ‘crisis’ must be stopped – Ottawa Citizen

Aboriginal ‘crisis’ must be stopped

Bartleman urges Canadians to help

By Kristy Nease, Ottawa Citizen September 25, 2011

Many First Nations communities in northern Ontario are facing a “crisis situation” that is quickly deteriorating and will continue to do so if Canadians don’t take notice and help, says James Bartleman.

During a Saturday night talk at Parkdale United Church, Ontario’s former lieutenant-governor pleaded with the audience of about 50 to attempt “to understand what’s below the surface” when they see homeless or struggling First Nations people, or hear their stories.

Cycles of abuse which began with the first generation of residential school students continue even now, decades after their closing, he said, and have to be addressed if rampant youth suicide rates are ever going to be curbed.

Read more: http://www.ottawacitizen.com/news/Aboriginal+crisis+must+stopped/5455083/story.html#ixzz1Z5qxl8iq

by NationTalk on September 26, 2011471 Views

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Aboriginal training centres form national school – Winnipeg Free Press

Aboriginal training centres form national school

By: Brenda Suderman
Posted: 09/24/2011

BEAUSEJOUR — After two decades of training aboriginal church leaders along the Brokenhead River, a United Church theological centre is about to be reborn.

On Oct. 1, the Dr. Jessie Saulteaux Resource Centre, located on Highway 44 just east of Beausejour, officially merges with the Francis Sandy Theological Centre of Paris, Ont., to become the Sandy-Saulteaux Spiritual Centre.

“There was a lot of feedback that it was important to have those names continued, connecting with the history of the two schools,” explains Norah McMurtry, former principal of Dr. Jessie Saulteaux Centre, who is staying on until her replacement is hired.

Read more: http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/arts-and-life/life/faith/aboriginal-training-centres-form-national-school-130493638.html

by NationTalk on September 26, 2011489 Views

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