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Economic reconciliation is the key to a new relationship between Indigenous peoples and Canada

by mmnationtalk on August 1, 20161438 Views

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Toronto, ON August 1, 2016 — Economic reconciliation is the key to a new relationship between Indigenous peoples and Canada.

Today in the Globe and Mail JP Gladu, the President and CEO of CCAB will articulate his position on economic reconciliation and the future of Aboriginal business. He writes:

“In many indigenous communities, this goal is becoming reality. From the northern Inuit communities of Labrador to the Southern Coast Salish peoples of British Columbia, indigenous Canadians are re- establishing themselves as full-fledged partners in economic development. But this success is revolutionary, and far from uniform. It’s up to all Canadians, as treaty peoples, to find innovative partnerships and ensure that negative stereotyping and a history of marginalization don’t hold indigenous Canadians back from economic reconciliation.”

Recommendation 92 of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) report clearly states that corporate Canada needs to engage in meaningful consultation with Indigenous peoples on all economic development projects, ensure equitable access to jobs and education, and to provide training on Indigenous history and culture, including the legacy of residential schools. Only when corporate Canada commits meaningfully to the principles laid out in the TRC report and the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP) will full reconciliation be achieved. An exciting economic renaissance is underway in Aboriginal communities across the country, and CCAB supports the need for economic reconciliation and invites you to be a part of the discussion around this issue.

Included below is a summary, key messages, and selected quotes from the article. We invite you to speak directly with Mr. Gladu for further insight and comment.

Please contact:

Andre Morriseau
Director, Awards & Communication 647.970.7661
amorriseau@ccab.com

 

About CCAB

CCAB is committed to the full participation of Aboriginal peoples in Canada’s economy. A national non- profit, non-partisan association, CCAB offers knowledge, resources, and programs to both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal owned companies that foster economic opportunities for Aboriginal peoples and businesses across Canada.

Title: TBD
Author: JP Gladu, President and CEO, Canadian Council for Aboriginal Business (CCAB)
Journal/Publication Date: Globe and Mail, Monday, August 1, 2016

 

Summary

Economic disempowerment lies at the root of many of the broader social challenges faced by Aboriginal peoples, and fixing the economic disparity is a vital part of any sustainable solution. The core of economic reconciliation is supporting Indigenous communities to ensure they have access to resources and opportunities to succeed, potentially unlocking hundreds of billions of dollars for the Canadian economy. Leaving economic equality out of any conversation on reconciliation risks outcomes that are only wallpapering over deeper realities of poverty.

Key Messages

  • Economic disempowerment lies at the root of many of the broader social challenges faced by Aboriginal peoples today
  • Fixing this economic disparity is a vital part of a sustainable solution, and requires innovative solutions to address the overarching obstacles to economic growth
  • With economic equality, indigenous people have the potential to unlock hundreds of billions of dollars for the Canadian economy
  • Indigenous Canadians are re-establishing themselves as full-fledged partners in economic development through entrepreneurship, partnerships, and as the fasting growing demographic in Canada

Quotes:

“(Economic) disempowerment lies at the root of many of the broader social challenges faced by aboriginal peoples today, compounded by the trauma of history. While fixing this economic disparity won’t be enough on its own to bring about reconciliation, it can be a vital part of a sustainable solution. Leaving economic equality out of any conversation on reconciliation risks wallpapering over deeper realities.”

“From the northern Inuit communities of Labrador to the Southern Coast Salish peoples of British Columbia, indigenous Canadians are re-establishing themselves as full-fledged partners in economic development….It’s up to all Canadians, as treaty peoples, to find innovative partnerships and ensure that negative stereotyping and a history of marginalization don’t hold indigenous Canadians back from economic reconciliation.”

“With economic equality, indigenous people have the potential to unlock hundreds of billions of dollars for the Canadian economy…We face a unique opportunity to remake the once-vibrant relationship between aboriginal peoples and businesses in the rest of Canada.”

“While many Canadian companies are proactively seeking to engage aboriginal peoples, we must continue to encourage corporate Canada not to ignore the importance of economic reconciliation. In a connected world, new truths and realities need to be respected. Aboriginal peoples want the same prosperity that most Canadians take for granted. All Canadians need to know that aboriginal business is a new force, while respecting our traditions, culture and responsibility to our children.”

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