Fifth anniversary of United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples: protection of Indigenous peoples’ rights to lands, territories and resources more urgent than ever

by mmnationtalk on September 14, 20121698 Views

nwac_logo

September 12, 2012

There is urgent need to uphold international human rights standards in response to intensive resource development activities affecting the lands of Indigenous peoples at home and abroad.

Five years ago, on 13 September 2007, the United Nations adopted the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples as the minimum standard for the “survival, dignity and well-being” of Indigenous peoples worldwide. As a universal human rights instrument, the Declaration is a beacon of hope and a blueprint for justice and reconciliation.

The rights affirmed in the UN Declaration include the right of Indigenous peoples to determine for themselves when, and under what conditions, resource development will be carried out on their lands and territories.

Canada officially endorsed the Declaration in November 2010. The federal government, however, has not collaborated with Indigenous peoples to implement the rights and related government obligations affirmed in the Declaration. To date the government has failed to ensure that Indigenous peoples are meaningfully involved in decisions regarding resource development. Government practice and policy, as well as new legislation brought forward by the federal government, continue to undermine Indigenous peoples’ rights.

A proposed pipeline to export oil sands crude to Asia has become a flashpoint for Indigenous peoples whose territories would be crossed. Before public hearings into the proposed Northern Gateway pipeline began, government ministers declared that increased export of oil sands crude was a matter of national interest. The federal government then limited the scope of environmental impact assessments, as well as the instances in which resource development projects would be subject to federal assessment.

Reliable identification and disclosure of risks is important for protection of Indigenous peoples’ rights, including the right to meaningful participation in the decision-making process. Reliance on the often perfunctory reviews carried out at the provincial level is an abdication of the federal government’s responsibilities to Indigenous peoples and of its obligations to ensure that all levels of government comply with international human rights standards.

The federal government has also played a key role in opening doors for Canadian resource companies to operate in other countries. Canadian corporations account for a significant proportion of extractive activities in the global South and are especially active in the territories of Indigenous peoples. The UN Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination has twice urged Canada to implement measures to hold Canadian corporations accountable for violations of the rights of Indigenous peoples. The federal government has failed to establish a mechanism with real power to hold corporations accountable or protect the rights of victims. The government has instead relied on voluntary measures and the poorly enforced weak laws of the host countries.

The Colombian Constitutional Court has concluded that at least one in three distinct Indigenous nations are in imminent danger of physical or cultural “extermination” as the consequence of armed conflict and forced displacement from their lands. Widespread human rights violations have been committed by all the warring parties as they fight over the resource-rich territories of Indigenous peoples. It was in this context that Canada negotiated a free trade agreement to promote Canadian investment in Colombia. Despite the crisis situation facing Indigenous peoples, Canada has yet to carry out a proper assessment of the impact such investment will have on human rights. The UN Special Rapporteur on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, James Anaya, has called for an independent assessment of the emergency situation facing Indigenous peoples in Colombia, including a visit by the UN Special Advisor for the Prevention of Genocide.

In his most recent report to the United Nations, James Anaya has drawn attention to the grave risks that resource development activities pose to Indigenous peoples throughout the world. The Special Rapporteur has said consultation and consent are necessary safeguards to ensure that government and corporate activities don’t compromise rights essential to the well-being and physical and cultural survival of Indigenous peoples. The Special Rapporteur also criticized the colonial nature of the current model of resource development in which any benefits to Indigenous peoples “typically pale in economic value in comparison to the profits gained by the corporation.”

Today, as celebrate the 5th anniversary of the UN Declaration and the promise that it holds, we draw attention to the need for good faith implementation in partnership with Indigenous peoples.

In regard to Indigenous peoples’ lands, territories and resources, our organizations are calling on governments in Canada to:

  • Ensure that all processes to review and license resource development activities in Canada are consistent with the constitutional obligation to protect inherent Aboriginal and Treaty rights and with international human rights standards, including the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.
  • Recognize free, prior and informed consent as an essential human rights safeguard, consistent with Indigenous peoples’ rights under Canadian constitutional and international human rights law.
  • Implement measures, consistent with the recommendations of the UN Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination, to ensure the accountability of Canadian corporations operating on the lands of Indigenous peoples in other countries.
  • Support the calls for the UN Special Advisor for the Prevention of Genocide to visit Colombia as part of an independent assessment of the emergency situation facing Indigenous peoples in that country.

 

Amnesty International Canada

Canadian Friends Service Committee (Quakers)

Chiefs of Ontario

First Nations Women Advocating Responsible Mining

First Nations Summit

KAIROS: Canadian Ecumenical Justice Initiatives

MiningWatch Canada

Native Women’s Association of Canada

The Treaty Four First Nations

Union of British Columbia Indian Chiefs

 

————————————–

 

 Cinquième anniversaire de la Déclaration de l’ONU sur les droits des peuples autochtones : la protection des droits des peuples autochtones sur les terres, territoires et ressources est plus urgente que jamais

12 septembre 2012

Il existe un urgent besoin de faire respecter les normes internationales des droits de la personne en réponse aux activités intensives de développement des ressources affectant les terres des peuples autochtones d’ici et d’ailleurs.

Il y a cinq ans, le 13 septembre 2007, les Nations Unies adoptaient la Déclaration sur les droits des peuples autochtones comme norme minimale pour « la survie, la dignité et le bien-être » des peuples autochtones à travers le monde. En tant qu’instrument universel des droits de la personne, la Déclaration est devenue un symbole d’espoir et un plan directeur en matière de justice et de réconciliation.

Les droits énoncés dans la Déclaration de l’ONU incluent les droits des peuples autochtones de déterminer eux-mêmes, quand et sous quelles conditions le développement des ressources sera effectué sur leurs terres et territoires.

Le Canada a officiellement appuyé la Déclaration en novembre 2010. Le gouvernement fédéral n’a cependant pas collaboré avec les peuples autochtones pour implanter les droits et les obligations gouvernementales reliés énoncés dans la Déclaration. À ce jour, le gouvernement n’a toujours pas su assurer que les peuples autochtones soient impliqués de façon significative dans les décisions touchant le développement des ressources. Les pratiques et politiques gouvernementales, de même que la nouvelle législation mise de l’avant par le gouvernement fédéral, continuent de miner les droits des peuples autochtones.

La proposition d’un pipeline pour exporter des sables bitumineux bruts vers l’Asie est devenue un point chaud pour les peuples autochtones dont les territoires seraient traversés par cette construction. Avant le début des audiences publiques concernant le projet de pipeline proposé par Northern Gateway, les ministres des différents gouvernements ont déclaré que l’augmentation de l’exportation de sables bitumineux était d’intérêt national. Le gouvernement fédéral a ensuite limité la portée des évaluations sur l’impact environnemental, de même que les cas où les projets de développement des ressources seraient sujets à une évaluation fédérale.

L’identification et la divulgation des risques sont importantes pour la protection des droits des peuples autochtones, qui incluent le droit à une participation significative dans le processus de prise de décisions. Le geste du gouvernement de se fier à des analyses souvent sommaires menées au niveau provincial constitue une abdication de sa responsabilité d’assurer que tous les paliers de gouvernement se conforment aux normes internationales des droits de la personne.

Le gouvernement fédéral a aussi joué un rôle-clé afin d’ouvrir les portes aux compagnies de ressources canadiennes pour opérer dans d’autres pays. Les corporations canadiennes constituent une proportion importante des activités d’extraction au sud du globe et sont surtout actives sur les territoires des peuples autochtones. À deux reprises, le Comité de l’ONU sur l’élimination de toute discrimination raciale a sommé le Canada d’implanter des mesures pour rendre les corporations canadiennes responsables de violations des droits des peuples autochtones. Le gouvernement fédéral n’a pas su établir un mécanisme avec un réel pouvoir de tenir les corporations responsables ou de protéger les droits des victimes. Le gouvernement s’est plutôt fié sur des mesures volontaires et sur les lois faibles et mal appliquées des pays hôtes.

La Cour constitutionnelle colombienne a conclu qu’au moins une nation autochtone distincte sur trois est en danger imminent d’« extermination » physique ou culturelle résultant d’un conflit armé et d’un déplacement forcé hors de leurs terres. Les violations généralisées des droits de la personne ont été commises par toutes les parties en guerre sur les territoires riches en ressources des peuples autochtones. C’est dans ce contexte que le Canada a négocié un accord de libre-échange visant à promouvoir les investissements canadiens en Colombie. Malgré la situation de crise à laquelle font face les peuples autochtones, le Canada n’a toujours pas mené une évaluation adéquate de l’impact d’un tel investissement sur les droits de la personne. James Anaya, Rapporteur spécial des Nations Unies sur les droits des peuples autochtones, a demandé une évaluation indépendante de la situation d’urgence à laquelle font face les peuples autochtones en Colombie, incluant une visite du Conseiller spécial des Nations-Unies pour la prévention du génocide.

Dans son plus récent rapport aux Nations-Unies, James Anaya a porté l’attention sur les graves risques que les activités de développement des ressources posent aux peuples autochtones à travers le monde. Le Rapporteur spécial a mentionné que la consultation et le consentement sont des garanties nécessaires pour assurer que le gouvernement et les activités corporatives ne compromettent pas les droits essentiels au bien-être et à la survie physique et culturelle des peuples autochtones. Le Rapporteur spécial a aussi critiqué la nature coloniale du modèle actuel de développement des ressources selon lequel tout bénéfice pour les peuples autochtones « fait pâle figure en valeur économique comparativement aux profits réalisés par la corporation. »

Aujourd’hui, alors que nous célébrons le 5e anniversaire de la Déclaration de l’ONU et de la promesse qu’elle contient, nous portons l’attention sur la nécessité d’une implication de bonne foi en partenariat avec les peuples autochtones.

En ce qui concerne les terres, territoires et ressources des peuples autochtones, nos organisations en appellent aux gouvernements du Canada :

  • D’assurer que tous les processus pour examiner et autoriser des activités de développement des ressources au Canada soient en accord avec l’obligation constitutionnelle de protéger les droits autochtones et les droits de traités inhérents et avec les standards internationaux des droits de la personne, incluant la Déclaration de l’ONU sur les droits des peuples autochtones.
  • De reconnaitre le consentement libre, préalable et éclairé comme une garantie essentielle des droits de la personne, en accord avec les droits des peuples autochtones et en vertu de la loi internationale et constitutionnelle sur les droits de la personne.
  • Implanter des mesures, en accord avec les recommandations du Comité des Nations-Unies sur l’élimination de toute forme de discrimination raciale, afin d’assurer la responsabilité des corporations canadiennes opérant sur les terres des peuples autochtones dans d’autres pays.
  • Soutenir les appels au Conseiller spécial des Nations-Unies pour la prévention du génocide de visiter la Colombie dans le cadre d’une évaluation indépendante de la situation d’urgence à laquelle font face les peuples autochtones dans ce pays.

 

Amnistie internationale Canada

Canadian Friends Service Committee (Quakers)

Chiefs of Ontario

First Nations Women Advocating Responsible Mining

First Nations Summit

KAIROS: Canadian Ecumenical Justice Initiatives

Mines Alerte Canada

Association des femmes autochtones du Canada

The Treaty Four First Nations

Union of British Columbia Indian Chiefs

 

Send To Friend Email Print Story

Comments are closed.

NationTalk Partners & Sponsors Learn More

CLOSE
CLOSE