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Billboards across Canada to showcase Indigenous women’s art

Credits: The Canadian Press

The Resilience Project is putting the work of 50 Indigenous women artists on billboards from coast to coast. Artist Lita Fontaine says the project gives the women a voice. (May 14, 2018)

The Canadian Press is Canada’s most trusted news leader in providing real-time, bilingual multimedia content for online, mobile and emerging platforms.

First Nations Fishing Rights – Fact Sheet

First Nations Fishing Rights – Fact Sheet

NATIONAL DAY OF FIRST NATIONS FISHING RIGHTS – MAY 21, 2018

Fishing is part of First Nations culture and identity. It sustains First Nations peoples and economies and is a constitutionally protected inherent and Treaty right. In the spirit of reconciliation and raising awareness of our shared history and future, the Assembly of First Nations National Fisheries Committee, by direction from Chiefs across the country, have declared May 21, 2018, a National Day of First Nations Fishing Rights. This is a day to honour the inherent right to fish, to raise awareness of its interconnectedness to growing sustainable environments, conservation and water protection and fostering healthy individuals and nations. Victoria Day was chosen by the National Fisheries Committee as a statement: this is an effort to decolonize a day named for the Queen who presided over many of the Treaties made with First Nations.

Fisheries & Colonization

  • At Canada’s Confederation in 1867, the federal government was given authority over fisheries and set up the Department of Marine and Fisheries. First Nations governments were not consulted or involved in the development of this legislation.
  • The Numbered Treaties were a series of 11 Treaties made between the Government of Canada and First Nations from 1871 to 1921, covering the area between Lake of the Woods (northern Ontario, southern Manitoba) to the Rocky Mountains (northeastern British Columbia and interior plains of Alberta) to the Beaufort Sea (north of Yukon and the Northwest Territories). 
  • As part of the obligations of the Hudson Bay Company for the transfer of Rupert’s Land and the North-Western Territory to the federal government, Canada had to address Indigenous claims to those lands. The Crown used the Numbered Treaties to get access to traditional territories and assert its jurisdiction in exchange for certain promises such as reserve lands, annual payments and hunting and fishing rights to unoccupied crown lands. 
  • From 1850-54, the Crown negotiated 14 treaties (known as the Douglas Treaties) with some of the Indigenous Peoples of Vancouver Island, that confirmed the right to “carry on our fisheries as formerly.”

Celebrating Fishing, Indigenous Cultures and Languages

  • Fishing promotes healthy family connections and activities. Fishing is more than the act of removing fish for food – it is teaching and talking about fish, the water sources and the many activities that impact First Nations rights and cultures.
  • Fishing in many First Nations is a key activity in transmitting cultures and languages. Use May 21 as an opportunity to learn, share and pass on those words and practices.
  • Fishing and food is integral in First Nations cultures. Fishing is an important part of trade, labour and the economy. It helps to shape identity, promote mental, physical and spiritual health, including suicide prevention and life promotion.
  • Sustainable, strong fishery economies and water and environmental protection fosters strong individuals and nations.

Inherent Rights and Governance Systems

  • First Nations in Canada have inherent and Treaty rights protected in the Canadian Constitution. These rights include the right to traditional and customary governance of traditional lands, waters and resources, including fisheries.
  • The duty of the Crown states that the federal government must consult and accommodate First Nations in any decision-making involved in First Nations territories. The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples further articulates Indigenous rights including Free, Prior and Informed Consent.
  • Courts in Canada, including the Supreme Court of Canada, have made a number of decisions recognizing First Nations rights. Some significant decisions recognizing the rights of First Nations to fish and exercise governance over their traditional fisheries include Sparrow (1990), Gladstone (1996), Delgamuukw (1997), Marshall (1999), Haida (2004) and Ahousaht (2009).
  • 200+ Canadian Supreme Court decisions bear the name of many First Nations individuals who fought valiantly for their rights. First Nations must now be included in any discussions on fisheries and oceans management, water source protection.
  • First Nations rights are also articulated in international law, specifically in the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. Specific articles related to fishing include Article 25, Article 32 (2) and Article 32 (3).

A number of First Nations are exercising the right to institute their own laws in regards to fishing. These include the Sheshegwaning First Nations first aquaculture law, Listguj Miqmaq first-ever salmon law and Nisga Lisims fish and wildlife laws.

NT5

Advancing Métis Rights and Self-Government: What We Heard

On behalf of the Provisional Council of the Métis Nation of Ontario (PCMNO) you are invited to watch the release of “Advancing Métis Rights and Self-Government: What We Heard,” the report of the MNO Commission on Métis Rights and Self-Government on Facebook Live between 6:30 and 7:30 pm, Friday, May 25. See video below for more information.

NT5

BC Government: Update on Trans Mountain expansion project permitting process

May 17, 2018

VICTORIA – In total, 1,186 provincial permits are required for the Trans Mountain expansion project, with many involving First Nations consultation.

To date:

  • 748 permit applications have been submitted to permitting agencies.
  • Of these, 212 have been approved and permits issued.
  • The remaining 536 submitted permit applications are being reviewed.
  • Another 438 permits have yet to be submitted by Kinder Morgan Canada Ltd.

All permits submitted must align with the 37 conditions outlined in the provincial environmental certificate, as well as the 157 conditions detailed in the National Energy Board’s approval.

Multiple organizations are involved, including:

  • Ministry of Forests, Lands, Natural Resource Operations and Rural Development
  • Ministry of Environment and Climate Change Strategy (including BC Parks)
  • Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure
  • Agricultural Land Commission
  • BC Oil and Gas Commission

The Ministry of Energy, Mines and Petroleum Resources has a dedicated project office supporting these ministries and their permitting requirements.

Contact:

Suntanu Dalal
Media Relations
Ministry of Energy, Mines and Petroleum
Resources
250 952-062

NT5

The Government of Canada is making a significant investment to restore coastal habitats of Gaspé and the Magdalen Islands through the Coastal Restoration Fund under the Oceans Protection Plan

May 18, 2018 – Gaspé, Quebec – The protection and restoration of the environment are top priorities of the Government of Canada, which is providing resources through the Oceans Protection Plan to ensure our oceans and coastlines are safer, cleaner and healthier for all Canadians and future generations.

The Honourable Diane Lebouthillier, Member of Parliament for Gaspésie-Les-Îles-de-la-Madeleine and Minister of National Revenue, on behalf of the Honourable Dominic LeBlanc, Minister of Fisheries, Oceans and the Canadian Coast Guard, announced today that Merinov will receive $2,107,599 over five years for the restoration of coastal habitats in Gaspé and the Magdalen Islands. The funds will be distributed through the Coastal Restoration Fund under the Oceans Protection Plan.

The project will provide solutions to the problem of erosion and habitat loss in the Gulf of St. Lawrence in the context of global warming. Indeed, the overall goal of the project is to use artificial structures planted with various large seaweed to reduce the impact of waves and current on shorelines being eroded, while creating preferential coastal fish habitats.

In May 2017, the Government of Canada announced the $75-million Coastal Restoration Fund to help rehabilitate some of our most vulnerable coastlines and protect marine life and ecosystems. The Coastal Restoration Fund, under the responsibility of Fisheries and Oceans Canada, supports projects that contribute to coastal restoration on all of Canada’s coasts, with preference given to projects that are multiyear and involve a broad number of partners, including Indigenous groups.

The Coastal Restoration Fund is part of the $1.5-billion Oceans Protection Plan ─ the largest investment ever made to protect Canada’s coasts and waterways. In collaboration with Indigenous peoples, local stakeholders and coastal communities, the Government of Canada is creating a world-leading marine safety system that provides economic opportunities for Canadians today, while protecting our coasts and waterways for generations to come.

Quotes

“Our government is committed to protecting our coasts. That’s why we announced the Oceans Protection Plan, to ensure our oceans and coastlines are safe, clean and healthy. The $75-million Coastal Restoration Fund provides an opportunity to address threats to our oceans and coastal areas. I am pleased that our collaboration with Merinov and its multiple partners will ensure healthy, thriving ecosystems for the coastal areas of Gaspé and the Magdalen Islands for future generations.”

The Honourable Dominic LeBlanc, Minister of Fisheries, Oceans and the Canadian Coast Guard

“This investment from the Government of Canada to restore coastal habitats in Gaspé and the Magdalen Islands is a strategic initiative that will represent a significant advantage for Quebec. In addition to fostering regional synergy between Merinov and its partners, this project will help reinforce the capacity of several stakeholders to protect and restore key fish habitats, including a salt marsh, beaches and coastal belts, and sea grass beds.”

The Honourable Diane Lebouthillier, Minister of National Revenue

“The reef seeding project will lay the groundwork for a new approach to restore marine environments to make them productive again, faster. The sustainability of fishing and aquaculture activities depends on innovations that meet both economic and environmental targets, for all components of the ecosystem.”

David Courtemanche, Director General, Merinov

Quick facts

  • The targeted areas are the bar of Sandy Beach in Gaspé Bay and the Plage de La Martinique in Placentia Bay in the Magdalen Islands.
  • The project has two major goals: to protect coastal habitats in these areas and to create a productive environment for fish in these areas with the installed structures.
  • Several partnerships will be maintained or established throughout this initiative, including Mi’gmaq Maliseet Aboriginal Fisheries Management Association, the Centre de recherche sur les milieux insulaires et maritimes,  the Comité ZIP Gaspésie, the Université du Québec in Rimouski, the Laval University, the Montréal Biodome and PESCA Environnement.

Related products

Associated links

Contacts

Media Relations
Fisheries and Oceans Canada
613-990-7537
Media.xncr@dfo-mpo.gc.ca

Vincent Hughes
Press Secretary
Office of the Minister
Fisheries and Oceans Canada
613-996-0022
vincent.hughes@dfo-mpo.gc.ca

NT5

Standing Hearing for Inquest into Death of Russell Spence

May 17, 2018

A standing hearing will take place to determine who can participate in the upcoming inquest into the death of Russell Spence, 31, of Winnipeg.

In the early hours of Oct. 12, 2016, Spence was arrested by the Winnipeg Police Service and taken to the Winnipeg Remand Centre (WRC).  During the check-in process, he and the correctional officers / police officers struggled and Spence became unresponsive.  Correctional staff called an ambulance and he was transported to Health Sciences Centre Winnipeg.  Resuscitation attempts were made at the WRC and the hospital but Spence died later the same day.

Under The Fatality Inquiries Act, an inquest has been called by the chief medical examiner.  Inquests explore the circumstances and events leading to deaths for the purpose of finding out what, if anything, might be done to prevent similar deaths in the future.

Before the inquest begins, the judge will decide who can participate in the process and question witnesses.  Individuals and groups may make an application to be granted standing and participate in the inquest.  Those interested in applying for standing should contact Mark Lafreniere, inquest counsel, at 204-391-2245 or mark.lafreniere@gov.mb.ca by June 8.

– 30 –

For more information:

  • Public information, contact Manitoba Government Inquiry: 1-866-626-4862 or 204-945-3744.
  • Media requests for general information, contact Communications Services Manitoba: 204-945-3765.
  • Media requests for ministerial comment, contact Communications and Stakeholder Relations: 204-945-4916.

NT5

NCC: Spring bird hunt for areas outside of Lake Melville extended to May 26!

May 17, 2018

Please note that NunatuKavut’s spring bird hunt has been extended to May 26, 2018 (30 minutes after sunset) in all areas outside of Upper Lake Melville. The Upper Lake Melville closing date of May 26 and the Egging (Gull) closing dates remain the same.

Here is a link to the latest Spring Hunt/Egg Harvest and Conservation Guidelines for 2018 with this revision:

NCC Spring Bird/Egg Harvest and Conservation Guidelines – 2018 *revised*

NT5

It pays to invest in biodiversity – CP

Source: The Canadian Press
May 18, 2018 

By Rashid Sumaila, University of British Columbia

THE CANADIAN PRESS

This article was originally published on The Conversation, an independent and nonprofit source of news, analysis and commentary from academic experts. Disclosure information is available on the original site.

___

Author: Rashid Sumaila, Director & Professor, Fisheries Economics Research Unit, University of British Columbia

In 2010, 193 countries stepped up to halt the global decline of biodiversity by 2020 as part of their commitment to the Convention on Biological Diversity.

They agreed to take urgent action to make sure that we would continue to have resilient ecosystems that provide essential services, secure the myriad of life on the planet and contribute to human well-being.

But vowing to save biodiversity is a large and unwieldy goal.

To guide them on this endeavour, the countries established the 20 Aichi Biodiversity Targets. These targets range from addressing “the underlying causes of biodiversity loss (Targets 1-4)” to reducing “the direct pressures on biodiversity (Targets 5-10),” and more.

A global assessment of resources

Preserving biodiversity costs money. A 2014 estimate put the cost of achieving the Aichi Targets at US$150-440 billion per year. That seems like a lot, but it’s the equivalent of spending US$20 to US$60 annually for each person in the world.

In order to meet these conservation needs, the global investment in biodiversity would have to increase fourfold from today’s level of only about 0.002 per cent of global GDP. Hence, the overall investment required is still relatively small given the many benefits of doing so.

After extensive review, our team of international researchers came to the conclusion that meeting the Aichi Targets would have benefits far beyond biodiversity _ it will improve human health and well-being via economic and environmental stability.

Focusing on the costs of implementing this plan makes it seem daunting, but our research suggests that failing to invest will have an even more frightening economic cost.

Conservation and sustainable use

Several studies suggest that failing to protect biodiversity leads to the loss of natural services, such as those provided by healthy habitats or mangroves. These are worth US$140 billion a year. In contrast, developing a global network of nature reserves on land and at sea would cost about US$45 billion a year to maintain.

Similarly, other research found that failing to halt the loss of biodiversity could result in annual losses in ecosystem services worth US$14 trillion per year by 2050, equivalent to seven per cent of global GDP.

It’s important to note that many of the world’s poor are directly dependent on biodiversity for not only food and nutrition, but also employment. Hence for the sake of the food, economic and social security of billions of people, we need to preserve biodiversity.

For instance, water scarcity is a big issue, with an estimated 1.8 billion people expected to be living in regions with absolute water scarcity by 2025, and two-thirds of the world’s population potentially living under water stress conditions.

The world’s fisheries employ as many as 260 million people and generate a landed value estimated at about US$150 billion annually.

Competition among highly subsidized industrial fishing fleets coupled with poor regulation and weak enforcement of existing rules has led to over-exploitation of the most commercially valuable fish stocks. This reduces the 1/8potential economic rent, which in simple terms means profit, 3/8 from global marine fisheries by at least US$50 billion annually.

What it comes down to is that the monetary and non-monetary benefits that come from biodiversity conservation and sustainable use frequently outweigh the costs.

Raising resources

Still, several measures need to be put in place before we can capitalize on this investment.

In less developed countries, we need increased international investment through overseas development aid and philanthropic donations. But these same countries must also develop effective policies and instruments to support this increase in investment. For example, to meet Aichi Targets, it would be better to seek donations that support policies for the sustainable use of fishery resources over those that stimulate overfishing.

If the world is to increase its chance of meeting the Aichi Targets and the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals, countries must find ways to bring biodiversity into the mainstream.

They could, for example, integrate it into their national accounting systems. They must also enhance the links between climate change policies and biodiversity conservation, and its sustainable use.

It’s also crucial that we recognize the in-kind contributions of Indigenous peoples’ and local communities’ collective actions, efforts and knowledge on conservation and sustainable use.

Investing in biodiversity would almost surely reduce the vulnerability of nations and communities to climate-related issues, while increasing their resilience and capacity to adapt.

___

This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read
the original article:
https://theconversation.com/it-pays-to-invest-in-biodiversity-91880

BC Government: Minister of Environment and Climate Change Strategy’s letter to federal counterpart

May 17, 2018

VICTORIA – George Heyman, Minister of Environment and Climate Change Strategy, has sent the following letter to his federal counterpart, Catherine McKenna, Minister of Environment and Climate Change.

Heyman’s letter, in response to correspondence received from McKenna on April 26, 2018, can be viewed here: https://news.gov.bc.ca/files/316322_McKenna_FINAL_SIGNED.PDF

Heyman has outlined differences, as well as individual and shared priorities, of both governments related to protecting B.C.’s environment and economy from the effects of a catastrophic oil spill. He has also suggested areas where the federal government needs to do more in areas of its jurisdiction, including improvements to the federal government’s Oceans Protection Plan.

Heyman has also proposed ways both governments can co-operate on their respective research regarding the behaviour of spilled heavy oils, as well as ways to jointly improve environmental protection.

Contact:

Media Relations
Ministry of Environment and Climate Change Strategy
250 953-3834

NT5

Riding Mountain National Park ready for the season – Brandon Sun

Riding Mountain National Park is open for the season just in time for the May long weekend, with a slew of upcoming events.

National Indigenous Peoples Day will be held June 21, and on June 23 it’s free entry day for National Indigenous Peoples weekend.

On July 1, there will be an annual Canada Day celebration with free entry and entertainment.

On Aug. 11, Clear Lake Celebration Day and Chamber Day come together to create a fun family event with free activities.

Read More: https://www.brandonsun.com/local/riding-mountain-national-park-ready-for-the-season-483000504.html

Notley tells B.C. pipeline backers: ‘This is becoming an issue of how Canada works’ – Calgary Herald

May 17, 2018

About 100 senior British Columbia business, Indigenous, community and labour leaders went to Edmonton for a one-day business and economic mission Thursday to hear Alberta Premier Rachel Notley speak and attend a special Edmonton Chamber of Commerce luncheon to meet business people from Edmonton and Calgary.

Read More: http://calgaryherald.com/business/local-business/premier-rachel-notley-this-is-becoming-an-issue-of-how-canada-works/wcm/00b7d41c-62b3-4154-9996-be4c665ed125

Government of Canada releases the Advisory Committee on Homelessness’ Final Report and the Homelessness Partnering Strategy Engagement What We Heard Report 2018

May 18, 2018    Gatineau, Quebec      Employment and Social Development Canada

One of the most important roles of the Government of Canada is to support vulnerable Canadians, including people who experience homelessness or are at risk of becoming homeless. All Canadians need and deserve housing that is safe, adequate and affordable.

Today, the Honourable Jean-Yves Duclos, Minister of Families, Children and Social Development, announced the release of the Advisory Committee on Homelessness – Final Report and the Homelessness Partnering Strategy Engagement – What We Heard Report 2018.

The Government of Canada launched an engagement process in 2017 to provide advice on how to improve the Homelessness Partnering Strategy (HPS). As part of a broader engagement strategy to reach Canadians, Minister Duclos created the Advisory Committee on Homelessness in June 2017 to provide advice on the redesign of the HPS. Chaired by Parliamentary Secretary Adam Vaughan (Housing and Urban Affairs), the Committee was composed of 13 leaders and experts in the field of homelessness from across the country who represented diverse regions and cultures, Indigenous people, Canada’s two official languages, and people who have lived experience of homelessness.

During the summer and fall of 2017, members of the Committee engaged a diverse group of Canadians across the country including experts, communities, organizations, people with lived experience of homelessness and Indigenous organizations through a series of 10 roundtables. Based on its deliberations and feedback received throughout engagement activities, the Committee delivered its final report to the Minister in spring 2018. The Advisory Committee on Homelessness – Final Report outlines 53 specific recommendations to provide advice to the Government of Canada for the redesign of the federal homelessness program and, more generally, to tackle homelessness in Canada.

The Government of Canada also launched an online feedback survey open to all Canadians and organizations to gather ideas and suggestions on how to prevent and reduce homelessness in Canada. The Homelessness Partnering Strategy Engagement – What We Heard Report 2018 contains highlights from the feedback received throughout all engagement activities undertaken in 2017.

The feedback received through all engagement activities will provide advice to the Government of Canada on the new federal homelessness program, which will be launched in the spring.

Quotes

“I am pleased with the valuable advice received over the course of this consultation period. The Government of Canada recognizes the pressing need to prevent and reduce homelessness in Canada. I want to thank the Advisory Committee on Homelessness and the Canadians from across the country who took the time to provide thoughtful input that will help us to design a new federal homelessness program.”

– The Honourable Jean-Yves Duclos, Minister of Families, Children and Social Development

“I want to thank the many Canadians from across the country who took time to engage with the Advisory Committee on Homelessness. Your input has been thoughtful, heartfelt and, above all, smart. It is clear from virtually every community that we must build on the good work already being done and do more.”

– Adam Vaughan, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Families, Children and Social Development

Quick facts

  • As part of the National Housing Strategy, the Government announced a total investment of $2.2 billion for homelessness over 10 years, building on Budget 2016 funding of $111.8 million over two years. By 2021–22, this will nearly double the investments made in 2015–16.
  • Over the past year, the Government of Canada consulted with stakeholders, provinces, territories and Indigenous partners on how the Homelessness Partnering Strategy can be redesigned to better prevent and reduce homelessness across Canada. These consultations were guided by the work of an Advisory Committee of experts and stakeholders in the field of homelessness, and chaired by Parliamentary Secretary Adam Vaughan (Housing and Urban Affairs).
  • Over the summer and fall of 2017, Parliamentary Secretary Adam Vaughan and the members of the Advisory Committee on Homelessness held 10 roundtables to talk to stakeholders, Indigenous partners and people who experienced homelessness from across the country to explore ways in which the federal homelessness program could be expanded and strengthened.
  • From July 17 to September 15, 2017, the Government of Canada launched an online feedback survey open to all Canadians and organizations to gather their views on how to prevent and reduce homelessness in Canada.
  • To give more Canadians access to housing that is safe, adequate and affordable, the Government launched the National Housing Strategy in fall 2017. It is expected that this strategy will help thousands of Canadian households in need find housing that meets these criteria.

Related products

Associated links

Contacts

Émilie Gauduchon-Campbell
Press Secretary
Office of the Honourable Jean-Yves Duclos, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Families, Children and Social Development
819-654-5546

Media Relations Office
Employment and Social Development Canada
819-994-5559
media@hrsdc-rhdcc.gc.ca

NT5

Sports scholars from across the globe make way to Winnipeg

Pre-conference workshop has focus on Indigenous resurgence and decolonization through sport history

MAY 18, 2018 — A major sport history conference hosted by the U of M’s Faculty of Kinesiology and Recreation Management is touching down in Winnipeg.

The 46th annual convention of the North American Society for Sport History (NASSH) is happening May 25-28 at the Fort Garry Hotel and the Canadian Museum for Human Rights.

The conference, to be attended by almost 200 people, will feature experts and sports scholars from across the continent, presenting on topics such as why sport matters; women, sport, and empowerment; Sticks, Pucks and Politics: Hockey and the Cold War, and much more. They keynote address on May 26 will be delivered by Grand Chief Wilton Littlechild.

The convention program has a full listing of topics and presentations.

Conference coordinator, Dr Russell Field, says he’s eager for the sports academics of the world to congregate in Winnipeg to share their knowledge, spur discourse, and create connections.

“We, as a faculty and university, are honoured to host NASSH and be the venue for important discussions on the cultural and historical significance of sport,” says Field, an associate professor in the Faculty of Kinesiology and Recreation Management.

NASSH’s purpose is to promote, stimulate, and encourage study, research, and writing on the history of sport; and to support and cooperate with local, national, and international organizations having the same purposes.

The main convention will be preceded by a pre-conference workshop entitled Indigenous Resurgence, Regeneration, and Decolonization through Sport History at the U of M May 23-34. This two-day symposium brings together scholars and community members concerned with the history of sport, physical activity, and embodied physical culture in the Indigenous context. In addition to facilitating the workshopping of research papers for a special issue of the Journal of Sport History, the symposium will also provide historians with the opportunity to learn through dialogue with community members.

The pre-conference workshop will feature a keynote presentation from Eugene Arcand. A survivor of the Indian Residential School system, Arcand is a member of the Governing Circle of the National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation and a First Nation Sports Hall of Fame inductee.

More information can be found on the NASSH website.

NT5

Three Found Guilty In Death Of Baptiste – 730 CKDM

A jury has found Regan Carlson, Raymond Bonser and Robert Laba guilty of manslaughter in the death of Garnett Baptiste from Ebb and Flow First Nation.

After an eight-day trial in Brandon Court of Queen’s Bench, the verdict came in last night, just before 7:00.

All three of the accused originally pleaded not guilty to manslaughter.

The incident took place in September 2015, where Baptiste was found injured in the parking lot of the Carberry Motor Inn.

He was pronounced deceased upon arrival at the hospital.

Read More: http://www.730ckdm.com/index.php/local-news/news/9973-three-found-guilty-in-death-of-baptiste

Statement by Minister Joly on International Museum Day

OTTAWA, May 18, 2018

International Museum Day, observed today around the world, is the perfect time to celebrate the important role our museums play in communities across Canada.

These places for education and the dissemination of arts, history and science reflect our inclusive society and our pride in its diversity. Many of them allow Canadians to learn about the essential contribution of Indigenous communities to our country’s development, thereby contributing to reconciliation efforts.

Our museums keep our heritage alive and put it within reach of current and future generations. In addition, as repositories of reliable information in an age of “fake news,” museums play an essential role in informing our reflections and critical thinking.

This year’s theme, “Hyperconnected museums: New approaches, new publics”, reminds us that our museums are constantly innovating. They offer renewed experiences as they expand their outreach to a changing and ever-growing clientele.

The Government of Canada is committed to supporting heritage institutions across the country. Through various programs and services, it supports the work of some 36,000 employees and 115,000 volunteers who provide us with rewarding cultural experiences.

Canada’s museum community is dynamic, creative and well worth discovering. Heritage institutions welcome more than 75 million visitors annually, including nearly 7 million students. In 2015, their websites recorded more than 200 million hits.

As Minister of Canadian Heritage, I encourage all Canadians to take advantage of the wealth of our country’s national, regional and local museums, which excel in the art of exhibiting our treasures, telling our stories, and highlighting our talents.

For more information (media only), please contact:

Simon Ross
Press Secretary
Office of the Minister of Canadian Heritage
819-997-7788

NT5

The governments of Canada and New Brunswick announce funding to help the people of New Brunswick save energy and money in their homes, businesses, and industry

May 18, 2018 – Moncton, New Brunswick

Canada and New Brunswick are working together to take climate action and find clean solutions to help Canadians save money, reduce energy waste, create jobs, and support healthy communities.

Today, the Minister of Fisheries, Oceans and the Canadian Coast Guard, Dominic LeBlanc—on behalf of the Minister of Environment and Climate Change, Catherine McKenna—and New Brunswick’s President of the Treasury Board and Minister of Postsecondary Education, Roger Melanson—on behalf of the Minister of Environment and Local Government, Andrew Harvey—and the President and CEO of New Brunswick Power, Gaëtan Thomas, announced a federal investment of almost $51 million to help New Brunswickers make energy-efficient upgrades to their homes, businesses, and industrial operations. This investment is part of further energy-efficiency investments in New Brunswick, which total $234 million.

The Government of Canada’s Low Carbon Economy Leadership Fund will support New Brunswick Power’s Total Home Energy Savings Program as well as programs for commercial and industrial energy efficiency. These programs help cover the cost of home-, commercial-, and industrial-efficiency retrofits across the province.

The Total Home Energy Savings Program will assist homeowners with energy-efficiency changes such as better insulation, home heating systems, heat-recovery ventilators, windows, doors, water heaters, drain-water heat recovery, and renewable-energy systems. The Government of Canada is supporting New Brunswick Power in expanding programming to homeowners that heat their homes with oil.

The program for commercial buildings will help business owners save energy, save money, and make energy-efficient retrofits in commercial buildings, which will have a positive impact on the environmental footprint of New Brunswick businesses.

The New Brunswick Power Energy Smart Industrial Program will provide financial incentives to industries to improve energy efficiency in their operations, which will reduce energy consumption, provide environmental benefits, and save on costs.

As part of New Brunswick’s energy-efficiency investments, New Brunswick Power is investing up to $82 million, over the coming five years, into programs for homeowners, businesses, and industries, to support a wide range of projects, including rebates and programs to help families and businesses. The Province of New Brunswick will invest $101 million toward retrofitting government buildings. These investments will help reduce carbon pollution and make life more affordable for people across the province, and they position New Brunswick as a leader in the global fight against climate change.

The Government of Canada’s Low-Carbon Economy Leadership Fund is providing $1.4 billion to provinces and territories that have adopted Canada’s clean growth and climate action plan, the Pan-Canadian Framework, to deliver on commitments to reduce carbon pollution, protect our environment, create good paying jobs, and strengthen Canada’s economy.

Quotes

“Protecting the environment and growing the economy go hand in hand. Through the Low Carbon Economy Leadership Fund, we are supporting provinces and territories to offer programs to help Canadian homeowners, businesses, and industries enhance energy efficiency and create healthier communities. That’s why we are investing in New Brunswick’s energy-efficiency programs: to assist New Brunswickers save money and energy as wells as reduce carbon pollution while contributing to the sustainable economic growth of their province.”

– Dominic LeBlanc, Minister of Fisheries, Oceans and the Canadian Coast Guard

“New Brunswick homeowners and businesses now have access to efficiency programs to save money, increase their comfort, and help protect the environment. Our efficiency programs deliver direct and measureable benefits to customers, reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and create green jobs, which will provide significant stimuli for the New Brunswick economy.”

– Gaëtan Thomas, President and CEO of New Brunswick Power

“We are very pleased that such comprehensive programs are being led by the efficiency team at NB Power. These incentives will help homeowners and businesses reach their energy saving goals while reducing our greenhouse gas emissions, helping our industry remain competitive, and relieving pressure on energy-generation needs.”

– Roger Melanson, New Brunswick’s President of the Treasury Board and Minister of Postsecondary Education, on behalf of the Minister of Environment and Local Government, Andrew Harvey

Quick facts

  • The Government of Canada’s Low Carbon Economy Leadership Fund will help make homes and buildings more efficient, comfortable, and affordable to run; help companies across Canada innovate and access technologies; and help the forest and agriculture sectors to enhance stored carbon in forests and soils.
  • Any homeowner can participate in the Total Home Energy Savings Program, regardless of the type of heating they have in their homes.
  • The Total Home Energy Savings Program uses Natural Resources Canada’s EnerGuide Rating System.

Related products

Associated links

Contacts

Caroline Thériault
Press Secretary
Office of the Minister of Environment and Climate Change
613-462-5473
caroline.theriault2@canada.ca

Anthony Doiron
Communications, Department of Environment and Local Government
506-444-2447
anthony.doiron@gnb.ca.

Media Relations
Environment and Climate Change Canada
819-938-3338 or 1-844-836-7799 (toll-free)
ec.media.ec@canada.ca

NT5

Grassy Narrows clean up will ‘take as long as it takes,’ Wynne says – CP

Source: The Canadian Press
May 18, 2018

TORONTO _ Ontario Liberal Premier Kathleen Wynne says cleaning up a mercury-contaminated river that has plagued two First Nation communities for decades “will take as long as it takes.”

Wynne, whose government committed $85 million for the remediation of the English-Wabigoon River system in northwestern Ontario, says preliminary work is starting now.

She says the infrastructure for the remediation is already being put in place and ongoing contamination must first be stopped before the mercury is cleaned up.

She gave no timeline for when residents of Grassy Narrows and Wabaseemoong First Nation can expect the river system to be clean, but says it has to be done.

People in those communities have dealt with mercury poisoning since a paper mill in Dryden, Ont., dumped the substance into the water in the 1960s, but mercury concentrations haven’t decreased in 30 years and are causing ongoing health and economic impacts.

NDP Leader Andrea Horwath is taking her election campaign to Grassy Narrows today.

INDEX: NATIONAL ONTARIO POLITICS

Government investing over $4M to bring internet to Indigenous communities – My Yellowknife Now

The Government of Canada is investing over $4.6 million through the Connect to Innovate program to bring new or improved high-speed internet to ten Indigenous communities, nine of which are in the Northwest Territories.

The funding was announced yesterday by Michael McLeod, Member of Parliament for Northwest Territories, on behalf of the Honourable Navdeep Bains, Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development.

“This investment in high-speed Internet will provide significant improvements in access to educational, health, social and economic resources for our territory and for our Indigenous communities,” said McLeod.

“I am pleased to see the building of these much-needed networks.”

The funding will be allocated to Northwestel to build fibre-optic backbone in the community of Jean Marie River.

Read More: https://www.myyellowknifenow.com/29474/government-investing-over-4m-to-bring-internet-to-indigenous-communities/

Two Indigenous protesters ordered to end protest at fish company – CP

Source: The Canadian Press
May 18, 2018

VANCOUVER _ Fish farming company Marine Harvest says the B-C Supreme Court has ordered two Indigenous protesters, who have occupied the company’s houses and dock at Swanson Island for months, to leave by Saturday evening pending an upcoming hearing.

Marine Harvest says the court also ordered them not to board or interfere with any of Marine Harvest’s salmon farms operating in the area.

It says the order is pending a June 25 hearing of an application by Marine Harvest for a broader injunction order.

Court documents filed by Ernest Alfred and Karissa Glendale, who are named as defendants, say they and many others from the ‘Namgis First Nation and surrounding First Nations are opposed to open-net fish farms in ocean waters in their traditional territories.

They say they are legitimately concerned about the impacts the farms have on local fish and sea life.

They say that as local Indigenous people in an area subject to ongoing Aboriginal title litigation, they have the right and responsibility to peacefully witness and observe fish farms and that an injunction sought by the company limiting them from within 20 metres of its fish farms is “overbroad.”

Marine Harvest was previously granted an injunction against protesters who were occupying its Midsummer Island salmon farm in December 2017.

Court records say the conditions of adjournment in the current case would be “similar” to those ordered in December 2017.

It says if persons re-occupy any of the sites in the undertaking, the company may reset an application in relation to that activity on 48 hours’ notice.

In a statement, Marine Harvest spokesman Jeremy Dunn says the occupiers are interfering with the company’s “legitimate activities.”

“Meaningful dialogue with First Nations in the Broughton Archipelago, where we have been operating salmon farms for 30 years, remains a priority for Marine Harvest. Unfortunately, our efforts to date have not been successful, but we remain hopeful,” Dunn said in a statement.

The defendants could not immediately be reached for comment.

INDEX: ECONOMY ENVIRONMENT FISHERIES JUSTICE

Where the leaders are for Friday, May 18 – CP

Source: The Canadian Press – Broadcast wire
May 18, 2018

Where the leaders of Ontario’s main political parties are campaigning on Friday, May 18:

___

Liberal Leader Kathleen Wynne

9 a.m. _ Makes an announcement, 4th Floor Rooftop, 401 Richmond St. W., Toronto.

1:15 p.m. _ Visits Mill Creek Gardens, 3 Little York St., Orangeville, Ont.

3 p.m. _ Tours Stevenson Memorial Hospital, 200 Fletcher Cres., Alliston, Ont.

___

Progressive Conservative Leader Doug Ford

11 a.m. _ Makes an announcement, Advanced Medical Group, 230 Victoria St., London, Ont.

___

NDP Leader Andrea Horwath

10:15 a.m. _ Holds a campaign event, Asubpeeschoseewagong First Nation, Band Administration Office, Grassy Narrows, Ont.

2:45 p.m. _ Holds a campaign event, 1520 Valley Dr., Kenora, Ont.

___

(The Canadian Press)

INDEX: ONTARIO POLITICS

OAHS and Habitat for Humanity Partner in Northumberland

Port Hope, ON – On Friday, April 20th local dignitaries, Habitat for Humanity Northumberland staff and volunteers, and Port Hope community members came together “Where Harcourt meets Hope St.” to welcome three local Port Hope families to their new homes.

“All of these volunteers have contributed to ensuring that these three families can achieve strength, stability and independence through affordable homeownership.” (- see article).

Habitat Northumberland partnered with OAHS’ Assisted Homeownership Program to provide one of the three families with access to down-payment assistance.

“It is of utmost importance to provide options when our people are faced with barriers to obtaining a traditional mortgage. This OAHS/Habitat partnership, along with the hard work and dedication put in by the Canniff/Smoke family, has resulted in an Indigenous family of five (5) now having a safe and permanent home in which to grow as a family,” said Sylvia Maracle, Chair OAHS Board of Directors.

Through the above partnerships and funding, a total of fourteen people (5 adults and 9 children) now have a safe and stable home.

Read the full article

NT5

Government of Canada signs Health MOU with Onion Lake Cree Nation in Treaty 6

May 17, 2018 – Onion Lake Cree Nation, Treaty 6 Territory – Indigenous Services Canada

The Government of Canada is committed to working together with First Nations to develop ‎a new type of funding arrangement for the improved delivery of health services that is respectful of Treaty rights and relationships.‎

The Honourable Jane Philpott, Minister of Indigenous Services, and Okimaw (Chief) Wallace Fox of Wicekaskosiw Sakahikan Nehiyaw Askiy (Onion Lake Cree Nation), today signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) to work together to develop a new type of funding arrangement that will enhance the Cree Nation’s control of health services based on a respectful Treaty relationship.

Wicekaskosiw Sakahikan Nehiyaw Askiy (Onion Lake Cree Nation) entered into Treaty No. 6 at Fort Pitt (in present day Saskatchewan) on September 9, 1876. Treaty No. 6 included commitments by the Crown that a medicine chest would be kept at the house of the Indian Agent for use by the Indians, and that rations would be provided to the Indians in times of “famine and pestilence”.

The Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) acknowledges these commitments, with Canada and Onion Lake Cree Nation agreeing to:

“…develop and establish a mutually agreeable signed Treaty Relationship Based Health Funding Arrangement that acknowledges that the treaty relationship is important and significant to the Crown in Right of Canada and the Treaty Peoples of Wicekaskosiw Sakahikan Nehiyaw Askiy (Onion Lake Cree Nation).”

The MOU also states that:

“Wicekaskosiw Sakahikan Nehiyaw Askiy (Onion Lake Cree Nation) asserts their right to additionally discuss with Canada the development and implementation as milestones are reached, a Treaty Based Health Funding Arrangement between the Crown in Right of Canada and the Treaty Peoples of Wicekaskosiw Sakahikan Nehiyaw Askiy (Onion Lake Cree Nation).”

Quotes

“I am honoured to sign this Memorandum of Understanding on behalf of the Government of Canada which commits Canada and the Onion Lake Cree Nation to the development of a Treaty Relationship-Based Funding Agreement in health. This MOU is founded on our rights-based relationship through Treaty 6, and will support Onion Lake as they provide high quality services that will best meet the health needs of their members.”

The Honourable Jane Philpott, M.D., P.C., M.P.
Minister of Indigenous Services

“When our ancestors put the medicine chest clause in the Treaty, they were thinking of the future generations, we are thinking of the future generations when we entered into this MOU. Wicekaskosiw Sakahikan Nehiyaw Askiy (Onion Lake Cree Nation) is always planning for the future generations to have good health and a good life.”

Okimaw (Chief) Wallace Fox
Wicekaskosiw Sakahikan Nehiyaw Askiy (Onion Lake Cree Nation) Treaty 6

Contacts

Rachel Rappaport
Press Secretary
Office of the Honourable Jane Philpott
Minister of Indigenous Services
819-934-2796

Media Relations
Indigenous Services Canada
819-953-1160

Philip Chief
Onion Lake Cree Nation
306-344-4200
Philip.chief@onionlake.ca

NT5

Somebody knows something:’ Family pleads for help after woman’s body found – CP

Source: The Canadian Press
May 17, 2018 

By Kelly Geraldine Malone

THE CANADIAN PRESS

WINNIPEG _ Family members are asking for help from the public after the body of a missing woman was pulled from the Red River in Winnipeg.

Police said their underwater search and rescue team found the body of April Carpenter Wednesday. They said it’s not clear how the 23-year-old died and an autopsy has been scheduled.

Carpenter had been missing since April 26.

“This is not how we wanted April to be found,” said Billy Dubery, speaking on behalf of the family Thursday. “The family, mom and sister, believed in their hearts that something happened.”

Carolyn Carpenter said her daughter loved children and recently went back to school.

“She wanted to be a social worker,” she said. “She was working to finish her education to become a social worker. That was her goal.”

Her family members say they believe April Carpenter’s death is suspicious because she loved life and her family. She was last seen at Winnipeg’s Health Sciences Centre, they said.

“Somebody knows something,” Dubery said. “We want somebody to come forward with any kind of information to give this family closure because we don’t believe that April wanted to be in the river.”

In 2014, Tina Fontaine’s body was found in the Red River wrapped in a duvet cover weighed down with rocks. The death shocked people across the country and helped spark the national inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women.

A jury found Raymond Cormier not guilty of second-degree murder in the death in February.

Member of the legislature Nahanni Fontaine posted on Facebook encouraging anyone with information to come forward “so we can find justice for April.”

Police said no further information was available and the investigation is continuing.

INDEX: JUSTICE

Delivering for Canadians and building stronger communities – Great-West Life, London Life and Canada Life release Public Accountability Statement

Winnipeg, MB, May 17, 2018 . . . Great-West Life, London Life and Canada Life have released their 2017 Public Accountability Statement, Delivering for Canadians.

The report describes how the companies operate in a socially responsible manner, and includes highlights of the ways they deliver for their customers – including their employees, distribution associates and Canadians across the country – each year.

“Our companies strive to improve the financial, physical and mental well-being of Canadians,” says Stefan Kristjanson, President and Chief Operating Officer, Canada. “This is our purpose and the reason why we do what we do. The 2017 Public Accountability Statement highlights examples of how we positively impact the well-being of Canadians in communities across the country.”

Here are some highlights:

Wellness

  • We contributed $3 million in community support to health-focused initiatives
  • The Evolution of Workplace Mental Health in Canada book was published in honour of the 10-year anniversary of the Centre for Mental Health in the Workplace

Environment

  • The Carbon Disclosure Project ranked us as the top Canadian insurance company for our commitment to environmental sustainability, and gave us an A- rating
  • GWL Realty Advisors were ranked as the top real estate management firm in Canada by the Global Real Estate Sustainability Benchmark
  • We recycled 67 tonnes of cardboard, 116 tonnes of compost and 976 tonnes of paper
  • GHG Emissions were reduced by 17.7%, water consumption by 16% and landfill waste 45%

Workplace

  • Our employees raised $2.2 million for charity
  • On National Aboriginal Day, CEO Paul Mahon signed the Winnipeg Indigenous Accord
  • We’re one of Forbes Canada’s best employers

Community

  • We supported over 750 education, health, arts & community initiatives, including:
    • Pathways to Education, who help low-income students graduate & pursue post-secondary education, contributing to declining drop-out rates
    • The University of Manitoba Leadership Institute – a nationally recognized teaching and research institute focused exclusively on leadership development
  • We’re an Imagine Caring Company, donating at least 1% of pre-tax profits
  • In 2017, we donated $13.5 million in community funding across Canada

Watch our video about the Public Accountability Statement on YouTubeOpens in a new window. You can also view and download Delivering for CanadiansOpens in a new window on the Great-West Life, London Life and Canada Life websites.

About Great-West Life, London Life and Canada Life

Together, Great-West Life, London Life and Canada Life help to build a brighter future for communities by providing financial support focused on education, health and wellness, arts, social services and community development. As an Imagine Caring Company, supporting the principles of corporate citizenship and benchmarks for community investment established by Imagine Canada, they contribute at least one per cent of average pre-tax profits in support of the communities where their employees live and work. In 2017, our companies contributed $13.5 million to communities. To learn more visit Greatwestlife.com.

For further information

Tim Oracheski
Director, Media & Public Affairs
204.946.8961
media.relations@gwl.ca

NT4

Urban elder and Indigenous rights activist Vern Harper ‘understood the realities of Toronto’ – CBC

Harper, 85, who died last week, will be laid to rest Friday in the city that he served

May 18, 2018

In the 1990s, when Jonathan Rudin first met Cree elder Vern Harper in Toronto, most Indigenous elders came to the city from elsewhere.

“They would come in and be here for a period of time and people would be able to talk to them and that was great, but Vern lived here. He lived in Toronto most of his adult life. He understood the realities of Toronto in ways that not everyone got,” said Rudin, program director at the city’s Aboriginal Legal Services.

“He was an elder not from a particular First Nation or community, but the community that he served was Toronto.”

Dubbed the “urban elder” decades ago, Harper died last Saturday at the age of 85 surrounded by members of his family in the city that he served for so many years.

Read More: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/toronto/vern-harper-1.4666986

Government of Canada makes a significant Coastal Restoration Fund investment in coastal habitat restoration in the Matane region through the Oceans Protection Plan

Baie-des-Sables, Quebec – The protection and restoration of the environment is a top priority of the Government of Canada, which is providing resources through the Oceans Protection Plan that will make our oceans and coasts safer, cleaner and healthier for the benefit of all Canadians and future generations.

Rémi Massé, Member of Parliament for Avignon–La Mitis–Matane–Matapédia, on behalf of the Honourable Dominic LeBlanc, Minister of Fisheries and Oceans and the Canadian Coast Guard, announced today that the Uni-Vert environmental group, in the Matane region, will receive $371,122 over four years for a project to help restore coastal habitats in the Matane region.

The project involves using natural stabilization techniques to restore coastal habitats with erosion problems in the Matane region. In addition to conserving important habitat, particularly for breeding capelin, the project will help reduce habitat area loss caused by certain storms. The areas affected are Baie-des-Sables, Les Méchins and Grosses- Roches.

In May 2017, the Government of Canada announced the $75-million Coastal Restoration Fund to help rehabilitate some of our most important coastlines and protect marine life and ecosystems. The Coastal Restoration Fund supports projects that contribute to coastal restoration on all of Canada’s coasts. Preference is given to projects that are multiyear and involve a broad number of partners, including Indigenous groups.

The $1.5-billion Oceans Protection Plan ─ the largest investment ever made to protect Canada’s coasts and waterways. Through the Plan, the Government of Canada is creating a world-leading marine safety system that provides economic opportunities for Canadians today, while protecting our coasts and waterways for generations to come. This work is achieved in close collaboration with the Indigenous peoples,the local stakeholders and the coastal communities.

Quotes

“Our government is committed to protecting our coasts – that’s why we announced the Oceans Protection Plan, which will make our oceans and coasts safer, cleaner and healthier. The $75-million Coastal Restoration Fund provides an opportunity to address threats to our ocean and coastal areas. I am pleased that our collaboration with the Uni-Vert environmental group, Matane region, will ensure healthy, thriving coastal ecosystems in the Matane region for future generations.”

The Honourable Dominic LeBlanc, Minister of Fisheries, Oceans and the Canadian Coast Guard

“This investment from the Government of Canada to restore coastal habitats with erosion problems in the Matane region, is a strategic initiative that will represent a significant advantage for the protection of marine life and ecosystems in the region.  In addition to fostering regional synergy between the Uni-Vert environmental group, the Matane region and its partners, the project will help reinforce the capacity of several organizations to restore key habitats.”

Rémi Massé, Member of Parliament for Avignon–La Mitis–Matane–Matapédia

Quick facts

  • The objective of the project is to stabilize eroding banks in three areas of the La Matanie RCM, namely Baie-des-Sables, Les Méchins and Grosses-Roches.
  • Various stabilization and bioengineering techniques will be used according to the characteristics of each of the sites, including the planting of lyme grass.
  • This stabilization work will make it possible to conserve coastal habitats, mainly beaches used by capelin for breeding.
  • A number of partnerships will be maintained or established throughout the initiative, namely with the Comité ZIP du Sud-de-l’Estuaire, the Conseil de l’environnement du Bas-Saint-Laurent, the Parages group and the La Matanie RCM.

Related products

Associated links

Contacts

Media Relations
Fisheries and Oceans Canada
613-990-7537
Media.xncr@dfo-mpo.gc.ca

Vincent Hughes
Press Secretary
Office of the Minister
Fisheries and Oceans Canada
613-996-0022
vincent.hughes@dfo-mpo.gc.ca

NT5

B.C. heading to court in Alberta to stop fuel restriction law, may seek damages – CP

Source: The Canadian Press
May 17, 2018 

By Dirk Meissner

THE CANADIAN PRESS

VICTORIA _ Tensions over the Trans Mountain pipeline increased Thursday with British Columbia announcing plans to launch a lawsuit over new Alberta legislation that could restrict fuel exports to the West Coast.

B.C. Attorney General David Eby said his province will ask the Court of Queen’s Bench in Alberta to declare the legislation unconstitutional on the grounds that one province cannot punish another.

The bill, which allows limits on fuel exports to B.C., was passed by Alberta’s legislature on Wednesday.

If Alberta moves to implement the act, B.C. will apply for an injunction and seek damages, Eby said.

“Unfortunately, proceedings like this can take years if it goes all the way up to the Supreme Court of Canada, which is why we wanted to start at the Supreme Court of Canada if we could,” he said. “But we’re starting at the court to get this remedy we’re seeking, which is to have this law struck as unconstitutional.”

Alberta Premier Rachel Notley declined to say when or how the legislation would be implemented, but she said she believes the law will withstand a legal challenge.

“We feel pretty confident that we have authority to control the export of our own resources under the Constitution as a means of maximizing the return to the people of Alberta,” she said. “So we’re going to go ahead with it on that basis.”

Notley told business leaders at a speech in Edmonton that her government doesn’t want to impose hardship on B.C. businesses and families, but Alberta must also safeguard its interests.

About 100 business people from B.C. travelled over the Rockies and joined 200 colleagues from the Edmonton and Calgary chambers of commerce to hear Notley speak.

“If we have to we’ll do what former Alberta premiers have done and we will act to assert our resources to get the most value possible out of our resources,” she said. “In so doing we will contribute to the long-term health of our country.”

Plans to triple capacity along Kinder Morgan’s existing Trans Mountain pipeline from Edmonton to Burnaby have pitted Alberta and the federal government against B.C.’s government, which says the risk of a spill is too great for the province’s environment and economy.

B.C. filed a reference case in the province’s Court of Appeal last month to determine if it has jurisdiction to regulate heavy oil shipments. It also joined two other lawsuits launched by Indigenous groups opposed to the $7.4-billion project.

Kinder Morgan has ceased all non-essential spending on the project until it receives assurances it can proceed without delays, setting a May 31 deadline on getting those guarantees.

Finance Minister Bill Morneau said Wednesday the federal government is prepared to offer an “indemnity” to help ease the political risks for any investors to ensure the pipeline expansion can proceed.

B.C. Premier John Horgan accused the federal government of committing tax dollars to back a private company’s venture.

Meanwhile, B.C. Environment Minister George Heyman rejected an offer Thursday from federal Environment Minister Catherine McKenna to form a joint panel of scientists to research oil spills.

Heyman said B.C. already has its own scientific panel looking into ways to prevent and respond to bitumen spills. He said McKenna is looking to form a Canada-wide panel, but B.C. needs to focus on its specific needs.

“Estimates for impacts on the city of Vancouver’s economy alone range from $215 million to $1.23 billion in the case of a catastrophic spill,” he said in a letter to McKenna.

_ With files from Dean Bennett in Edmonton.

INDEX: OIL&GAS NATIONAL BUSINESS JUSTICE POLITICS

Detour Gold Announces Board and Management Changes

TORONTO, May 18, 2018  – Detour Gold Corporation (TSX: DGC) (“Detour Gold” or the “Company”) announces that Paul Martin will be retiring as President and Chief Executive Officer and as a member of the Board, effective June 1, 2018. Michael Kenyon, Chairman of the Board, will assume the role of Interim Chief Executive Officer and Alex Morrison, Director, will assume the role of Board Chairman effective June 1, 2018.

Michael Kenyon commented, “On behalf of our employees and the Board, we all recognize the immense contribution Paul has made to Detour Gold. We wish to extend our genuine appreciation for his dedicated service, first as Chief Financial Officer during the development and commissioning phases of the Detour Lake gold mine, and subsequently as CEO in leading the Company through its early operational years. We wish him all the best in his retirement.”

Paul Martin said, “I am grateful for my nearly 10 years of service at Detour Gold. I am proud to have been part of the leadership team through the many positive strides we have made over the last decade.  Now it is time for new leadership to take the Company forward in maximizing the value of the Detour Lake gold mine and focusing on the next phase of growth.”

Michael Kenyon added, “I look forward to working with the leadership team as the Company proceeds in implementing a number of key operational initiatives to ensure the long-term success of the Company. I have committed to this role in order to provide continuity while Frazer Bourchier, Chief Operating Officer, focuses on those initiatives. The Board will be commencing a formal process to appoint a new CEO and I anticipate a decision to be made no later than early 2019.”

As Chairman, Alex Morrison will bring more than 25 years of capital markets and mining operations experience to his new role, including past senior positions as Vice President and Chief Financial Officer of Franco Nevada and Vice President Operations Services at Newmont Mining. In light of Alex Morrison assuming this role, Andre Falzon will assume the role of Audit Committee Chair effective June 1, 2018. Alex Morrison will remain as a member of the Audit Committee.

About Detour Gold

Detour Gold is an intermediate gold producer in Canada that holds a 100% interest in the Detour Lake mine, a long life large-scale open pit operation. Detour Gold’s shares trade on the Toronto Stock Exchange under the trading symbol DGC.

For further information, please contact:

Michael Kenyon, Chairman

Laurie Gaborit, VP Investor Relations

Tel: 416-304-0800           

Tel: 416-304-0581

Detour Gold Corporation, Commerce Court West, 199 Bay Street, Suite 4100, P.O. Box 121, Toronto, Ontario M5L 1E2

NT4

Indigenous architects take world stage for Canada in ‘amazing step’ toward reconciliation – Ottawa Citizen

May 18, 2018

A showcase of Indigenous architecture that will represent Canada on the world stage is being hailed as an “amazing step” toward reconciliation by the man leading the talented team.

Eminent Canadian architect Douglas Cardinal, who’s best known for designing the Canadian Museum of History in Gatineau and the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian in Washington D.C., is leading the team of 17 architects from across North America, otherwise known as Turtle Island.

Their work is being featured at this year’s Venice Biennale in Architecture — the 16th annual edition of the world’s most important exhibition of contemporary architecture. More than 70 countries are participating in the event, which opens in Venice on May 26 and runs until Nov. 25. It’s expected to attract more than 300,000 visitors.

Titled Unceded: Voices of the Land, the work by Cardinal and his team explores themes of environmental stewardship, Indigenous rights and the teachings of a matriarchal society to the world stage.

Read More: http://ottawacitizen.com/entertainment/local-arts/indigenous-architects-take-world-stage-for-canada-in-amazing-step-toward-reconciliation

Indigenous architects take world stage for Canada in ‘amazing step’ toward reconciliation – Ottawa Citizen

May 18, 2018

A showcase of Indigenous architecture that will represent Canada on the world stage is being hailed as an “amazing step” toward reconciliation by the man leading the talented team.

Eminent Canadian architect Douglas Cardinal, who’s best known for designing the Canadian Museum of History in Gatineau and the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian in Washington D.C., is leading the team of 17 architects from across North America, otherwise known as Turtle Island.

Their work is being featured at this year’s Venice Biennale in Architecture — the 16th annual edition of the world’s most important exhibition of contemporary architecture. More than 70 countries are participating in the event, which opens in Venice on May 26 and runs until Nov. 25. It’s expected to attract more than 300,000 visitors.

Titled Unceded: Voices of the Land, the work by Cardinal and his team explores themes of environmental stewardship, Indigenous rights and the teachings of a matriarchal society to the world stage.

Read More: http://ottawacitizen.com/entertainment/local-arts/indigenous-architects-take-world-stage-for-canada-in-amazing-step-toward-reconciliation

Riding Mountain National Park is open for the visitor season!

Free admission for youth at Parks Canada places starting in 2018

May 17, 2018              Riding Mountain National Park, Manitoba    Parks Canada Agency

Parks Canada’s places represent the very best that Canada has to offer and tell stories of who we are, including the history, cultures, and contributions of Indigenous peoples.

Millions of Canadians celebrated Canada 150 with free admission to Parks Canada’s places in 2017 and more Canadians than ever before had amazing experiences. Building on that success, the Government has announced free admission to Parks Canada’s places for youth aged 17 and under, starting in 2018 and beyond. This will make discovering nature and connecting with our history easier and more affordable for families.

Through the Parks Canada Discovery Pass, families and groups will have unlimited opportunities to visit national parks, marine conservation areas, and historic sites throughout the year.

Riding Mountain National Park is welcoming visitors for the 2018 season. This year, at Riding Mountain National Park, we will be hosting a number of special events, including celebrations on June 21 for National Indigenous Peoples Day, along with a free entry day on June 23 for National Indigenous Peoples Day weekend. On July 1, our annual Canada Day celebration includes free entry and entertainment for the whole family. On August 11, Clear Lake Celebration Day and Chamber Day come together to create a fun family event with free activities.

Riding Mountain National Park offers daily interpretive programming throughout the summer, such as Paddle Clear Lake, Campfire evenings for families and adults with topics ranging from bear safety to Indigenous culture, and a NEW Townsite Tour for adults. This summer we are offering two Heritage Camping Experiences where participants have the opportunity to be immersed in Anishinabe culture while riding on horseback, learning to raise a tipi, and falling asleep under the ancient starry sky. For more details on our programs, check in at the Visitor Centre or on our website.

September will be a fun filled month, starting off with our Dark Sky weekend from August 31 to September 3. Sign up for a free stargazing workshop and enjoy the dark skies of Riding Mountain National Park. The Pride celebration weekend will kick off on September 14 with free programming for all. Come to the family dance party and celebrate diversity! Join us for the 2018 season!Watch our website for details.

Parks Canada is actively working with our partners, including Indigenous groups, to share the stories of our treasured places, and to monitor and restore sensitive ecosystems, advance conservation initiatives, protect species at risk, and expand our knowledge of biodiversity and climate change.

To have a memorable time and make the most of their Parks Canada experience, visitors are encouraged to plan their trip in advance. Visitors can order their Discovery Pass and make camping reservations online by visiting the Parks Canada’s website. Visitors are also encouraged to download the incredibly popular Parks Canada’s mobile app and follow us on social media for more information about the breathtaking locations, and hidden gems at national parks, marine conservation areas, and historic sites.

Quotes

“This year we are celebrating families with free admission for youth aged 17 and under. We want to inspire youth to discover, connect, and protect Canada’s remarkable nature and history. And as always, we encourage all visitors to plan their trips and discover new and exciting destinations across the country by consulting Parks Canada’s website, or downloading the Parks Canada’s Mobile App for a list of hidden gems and other unique and memorable ways to experience our national treasures.”

The Honourable Catherine McKenna,
Minister of Environment and Climate Change and Minister responsible for Parks Canada
Quick facts

  • Parks Canada manages a nation-wide network of 171 national historic sites, 46 national parks, one national urban park, and four national marine conservation areas.
  • Beginning in 2018, Parks Canada will return to fee-based admission. Admission fees will not increase over 2016 levels.
  • Parks Canada will continue to offer free admission to new Canadian citizens for one year through the Institute for Canadian Citizenship’s Cultural Access Pass Program.
  • Canadians are encouraged to order their Parks Canada Discovery Passes online. Discovery Passes are also available at Parks Canada entry gates and visitor centres. Please visit the Parks Canada’s website for more information.
  • As in the past, our partners, such as Mountain Equipment Co-op (MEC), will be selling Discovery Passes as of January 2018. Please visit the webpage of a partner location near you for details.
  • Enter Parks Canada’s Discover Canada contest for a chance to win an amazing trip to Canada’s west coast and other bi-weekly prizes, including Discovery Passes, merchandise and more. In collaboration with our proud partners: MEC, CIBC and Air Canada.
  • Riding Mountain National Park has had a successful eight-year run of offering the annual free concert. Parks Canada has decided to conclude with last year’s Canada 150 concert and focus on other exciting visitor experience offers in the future. Parks Canada is grateful to all of the performers and attendees that made the annual free concert a great success.

Associated links

Contacts

Trish Johnston
Public Relations and Communications Officer
Riding Mountain National Park
Parks Canada
204-848-7248
trish.johnston@pc.gc.ca

Media Relations
Parks Canada Agency
855-862-1812
pc.media@pc.gc.ca

NT5

Explore Your Yukon tourism campaign returns

May 05, 2018

Yukoners are encouraged to explore businesses and attractions throughout the territory during this year’s Explore Your Yukon tourism campaign which begins today and runs until June 17.

Over 55 participating businesses, historic sites, museums and First Nation cultural centres in 12 communities will offer Yukoners and early season visitors a special incentive to ‘Explore Your Yukon.’

In addition to special offers, participants have the opportunity to enter to win prizes.

Yukon’s vibrant communities are filled with rich cultural attractions, unique local businesses and a welcoming hospitality sector. I encourage all Yukoners to take advantage of the Explore Your Yukon campaign to discover more of what the territory has to offer.

Minister of Tourism and Culture Jeanie Dendys

Who What Where Tours is excited to participate in the Explore Your Yukon campaign once again this year. This program is a fantastic way for Yukoners to learn about amazing and unique Yukon experiences in our very own backyard, and then share those experiences with family, friends and visitors throughout the summer season and beyond. Who What Where Tours looks forward to hosting you on your Yukon adventures!

Teena Dickson, Who What Where Tours

Quick Facts

  • Explore Your Yukon coupon books are available at Visitor Information Centres in Beaver Creek, Carcross, Dawson, Haines Junction, Watson Lake and Whitehorse. The coupon books are also available at Canadian Tire in Whitehorse.
  • Grand prizes include:
    • One (1) return flight for two (2) travelers between Whitehorse and Dawson City from Air North, Yukon’s Airline, valued at $800;
    • One (1) 40-minute glacier flightseeing tour for two (2) people from Kluane Helicopters, valued at $550;
    • Two (2) night stay in a beautifully appointed Classic Room at Inn on the Lake, valued at $380; and
    • Two (2) Beer Glasses featuring Lumel’s signature Northern Lights design from Lumel Studios Glass Blowing, valued at $150.

Contact

Sunny Patch
Cabinet Communications
867-393-7478
sunny.patch@gov.yk.ca

Carleen Kerr
Communications, Tourism and Culture
867-332-2624
carleen.kerr@gov.yk.ca

NT5

New exhibit re-imagines superheroes by Indigenous artists – Daily Herald Tribune

May 17, 2018

Spider-Man and the Hulk will receive a makeover as a gallery re-imagines them with Indigenous concepts.
“When Raven Becomes Spider” will open to the public on Friday, May 18 from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. at the Art Gallery of Grande Prairie and will be on view until Aug. 19. It
is organized by the Dunlop Art Gallery and Regina Public Library.

The exhibit explores concepts of heroism, transformation and individual and community resilience. It introduces new heroes with archetypes along the aforementioned heroes, according to a news release.

Leena Minifie, curator for the exhibit said it initiates an important dialogue for the community.

Read More: http://www.dailyheraldtribune.com/2018/05/17/new-exhibit-re-imagines-superheroes-by-indigenous-artists

Miss Manito Ahbee finds strength in sharing her story and honouring MMIWG – CBC

‘We need to honour them,’ says Chante Speidel, who will pass on the title at the festival this weekend

May 18, 2018

The title of Miss Manito Ahbee Youth Ambassador carries a lot more weight than many other similar titles.

Since 2006, the title has also been used by the Manito Ahbee festival — which celebrates Indigenous arts, culture and music — as a way to honour the memory of missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls.

Every four years — four being a sacred number in Indigenous tradition, marking the completion of a full cycle — a different missing or murdered Indigenous woman is chosen to be honoured by the youth ambassador, according to the Manito Ahbee website.

Read More: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/manitoba/chante-speidel-miss-manito-ahbee-honouring-mmiwg-1.4668181

A New Approach for Tripartite Investment in First Nation Mental Health and Wellness

May 17, 2018 – COAST SALISH TERRITORY, Vancouver, B.C. – Indigenous Services Canada

Building on the progress of the tripartite health initiative, the Government of Canada, the Province of British Columbia and the First Nations Health Council (FNHC) have agreed to take significant steps to improve First Nation mental health wellness outcomes in BC.

First Nations in BC have identified mental health and wellness as a top priority. Through discussions on the social determinants of health and wellness led by the FNHC, BC First Nations have been consistent in their calls for immediate action to improve mental health and wellness services and supports.

The Government of Canada, the Province of British Columbia and the FNHC will establish a new approach for federal and provincial investment in mental health and wellness services. This new funding approach will allow First Nations to plan, design and deliver a continuum of community-based mental health and wellness services based on their health plans and priorities. Through this new approach, the partners aim to simplify the process for First Nations to access funding for mental health and wellness services by pooling federal and provincial funding and establishing new and more flexible funding arrangements that focus on outcomes. The partners are committed to facilitating greater cross-government collaboration to enhance the coordination of mental health and wellness services accessed by First Nation children, youth and families in BC.

As part of this new agreement, Canada, BC and the First Nations Health Authority (FNHA) will each invest $10 million over two years for a total funding commitment of $30 million. This initial investment will support a series of demonstration sites that support enhanced service delivery models for mental health and wellness. In addition, this initial investment will support First Nation communities and Nations in BC to develop, renew or redesign mental health and wellness plans in a manner that aligns with their vision of health and wellness. These plans will focus on prevention and enhancing protective factors associated with positive mental health and wellness outcomes.

Canada and BC recognize the need to build, repair, renovate and expand a number of Indigenous treatment centres in BC. This aligns with the Province of British Columbia’s commitment to transform the mental health and addictions system of care to ensure a seamless, integrated, and comprehensive experience where all British Columbians, including Indigenous Peoples, can access effective culturally safe services and supports. Canada, BC, the FNHC and the FNHA are committed to working together as partners in the Tripartite Framework Agreement on First Nation Health Governance (2011) to develop a tripartite plan to address these objectives. This plan will be presented at the next meeting of the Tripartite Committee on First Nations Health in September 2018.

Today’s announcement was made at Gathering Wisdom for a Shared Journey IX, a forum hosted by the FNHC on Coast Salish Territory in Vancouver that brings together First Nations from across BC to engage in direct dialogue with each other and federal, provincial and health system partners on factors that influence the health and wellness of their children, families and communities.

Quotes

“Mental health and wellness is a priority shared by all partners, and I am pleased to see this commitment announced today between the Government of Canada, the Province of BC, and the First Nations Health Council. Providing greater flexibility and focusing more on health outcomes, this tripartite commitment will allow First Nation communities in BC to better develop, renew or redesign plans and services in a manner that aligns with their vision of health and wellness. ”

The Honourable Jane Philpott, M.D., P.C., M.P.
Minister of Indigenous Services

“These investments and the priorities they address are the result of the engagement we have done with our regional and sub-regional caucuses,” said Grand Chief Doug Kelly, chair of the First Nations Health Council. “They’ve told us that untreated trauma and mental health and substance use issues are perpetuating the physical, psychological and economic disparities suffered by our people. By making these investments today, we are building the foundation of our shared vision of healthy, self-determining and vibrant First Nation children, families and communities.”

Grand Chief Doug Kelly
Chair of the First Nations Health Council

“Our ministry is working in close partnership with the First Nations Health Council and First Nations Health Authority to strengthen and expand the First Nation community response for mental health and addictions programs and services,” said Judy Darcy, Minister of Mental Health and Addictions.  “This investment demonstrates our commitment to work alongside First Nation communities, and our commitment to reconciliation through action and healing.”

The Honourable Judy Darcy
Minister of Mental Health and Addictions, British Columbia

Quick facts

  • The Government of Canada, the Province of BC and First Nations in BC have established a broad and enduring health partnership that is set out in a series of health plans and agreements, including the Tripartite First Nations Health Plan (2007), the Tripartite Framework Agreement on First Nation Health Governance (2011) and the Health Partnership Accord (2012). Through these health plans and agreements, Canada, BC and BC First Nations have established a new health governance structure and relationship that supports the tripartite partners to achieve their shared vision for a better, more responsive and integrated health system for First Nations in BC.
  • The First Nations Health Council is a political advocacy body appointed by BC First Nations to support First Nations in achieving their health priorities and objectives and to provide oversight to the First Nations Health Authority. For more information about the First Nations Health Council visit www.fnhc.ca.
  • The First Nations Health Authority (FNHA) is responsible for planning, management, service delivery and funding of health programs, in partnership with First Nations communities in BC. For more information about the First Nations Health Authority, visit www.fnha.ca.‎

Contacts

Gavin Wilson
Media Relations
First Nations Health Authority
778-991-1229

Ministry of Mental Health and Addictions Communications
778-974-2011
Connect with the Province of B.C. at: www.gov.bc.ca/connect

Rachel Rappaport
Press Secretary
Office of the Honourable Jane Philpott
Minister of Indigenous Services
819-934-2796

Media Relations
Indigenous Services Canada
819-953-1160

NT5

Watay Power Offering Training Program – 89.5 The Lake FM

May 18, 2018

Watay Power is offering a new training program geared to provide employment to area Indigenous populations.

The First Nation power company is teaming up with a number of training organizations to help offer the proram to those who want to gain direct or indirect employement in the construction of their new transmission line.

The first set of students started their training today.

Read More: http://www.895thelake.ca/news/1802528133/watay-power-offering-training-program

Media Advisory: Premiers to discuss outcomes of Western Premiers’ Conference

YELLOWKNIFE (May 16, 2018) – Canada’s Western Premiers, hosted by Northwest Territories Premier, Bob McLeod, will participate in a media conference following the conclusion of the 2018 Western Premiers’ Conference.

An overview of the meeting will be provided, with time for questions at the end.

When: Wednesday, May 23, 2018
Time: 11:30 a.m. MDT
Where: Caribou Room, Chateau Nova, Yellowknife, NT

All media must be registered in advance in order to access the media conference.

A teleconference line will be provided for those who cannot attend in person.

For more information and/or to register:
Krystal Pidborochynski
Senior Cabinet Communications Advisor
Cabinet Communications and Protocol
Government of the Northwest Territories 867-767-9140 ext. 11095
krystal_pidborochynski@gov.nt.ca

NT4

Protect Canada’s parks from being ‘loved to death’ says study co author – CP

Source: The Canadian Press
May 17, 2018 

By Camille Bains

THE CANADIAN PRESS

VANCOUVER _ Canada is a global leader in protecting its conserved land from human destruction, but its parks are in danger of being “loved to death” by thousands of people trekking through the backcountry, says a co-author of a study that details the degradation of one-third of the world’s protected areas.

Oscar Venter, associate professor of forestry in the ecosystems science and management department at the University of Northern British Columbia, said Banff and Jasper are examples iconic parks in Canada where a high number of visitors pose a challenge to maintaining healthy populations of some endangered species.

Economic pursuits, such as forestry, mining and oil and gas, are also part of the problem, Venter said.

“In Canada, we value our natural environment but we also put a lot of value on natural resource extraction,” he said.

Venter is part of an international team of researchers, including from the University of Queensland in Australia and the Wildlife Conservation Society, whose work was published Thursday in the journal Science. It looked at 50,000 protected areas worldwide and found one-third of the area is under intense pressure from activities like road building, logging and urbanization.

Most of the degradation was in Asia, Europe and Africa _ in areas that were intact when they were designated as protected, the study says, adding there’s an urgent need for countries around the world to objectively assess the impact of human activity.

The findings are a reality check on the effort to avert the biodiversity crisis, said senior author James Watson, associate professor in the school of earth and environmental sciences at the University of Queensland and director of science and research initiative at the Wildlife Conservation Society.

“We show that governments are significantly overestimating the space they have made available for nature,” he said in a statement. “Governments are claiming these places are protected for the sake of nature when in reality they aren’t. It is a major reason why biodiversity is still in a catastrophic decline, despite more and more land being protected.”

Watson said 111 countries believe they have met their obligations toward the United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity, which set a global goal in 2010 for nations to protect at least 17 per cent of their land by 2020.

“If you only counted the lands in protected areas that are not degraded, 77 of those nations don’t meet the bar,” he said.

“Helping them succeed requires more sustained and dedicated effort and we are undertaking research to identify those intact, biologically important places around the world that still need protection and the mechanisms that will best ensure they are protected.”

Venter said that while 2.5 per cent of Canada’s protected area has been modified by humans, there are challenges to managing the impact of human disturbance to endangered species, such as caribou in parks in the Rocky Mountains and elsewhere.

As for meeting its commitment by 2020, Canada has so far reached only 10.5 per cent of its goal while Namibia and Costa Rica are further ahead, he said.

“There’s a commitment from the federal government to protect 700,000 square kilometres of land. That’s an area the size of Alberta,” Venter said of Ottawa’s strategy, which was boosted with a $1.3-billion commitment in the last budget.

“One of the first places we have to look is our recreational parks and how do we balance the recreational opportunities we provide in those areas with the conservation values we have.”

Alison Ronson, national director of the parks program at the Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society, said while several provinces have recently moved to protect land to meet the 2020 conservation target, Canada was behind all G7 countries when the society issued a report last summer.

Brazil had protected 29.5 per cent of its land by then, China was up to 17.1 per cent and Australia had reached 17 per cent, the report said.

“The balance in the country has been so skewed toward industrial activity for such a long time,” Ronson said of Canada.

Federal, provincial and territorial governments need to work with Indigenous governments to meet their conservation goals, she said.

Parks Canada said British Columbia leads all provinces and territories in protecting 15.3 per cent of its land and freshwater. Alberta is in second, with 14.5 per cent of its area protected as of Tuesday, when it added more than 13,000 square kilometres of forest, wetland, lakes and rivers. Prince Edward Island is in last place with 3.2 per cent of its area protected.

_ Follow ?CamilleBains1 on Twitter.

INDEX: OIL&GAS FORESTRY ENVIRONMENT NATIONAL POLITICS

Government of Canada provides skills training and job opportunities for young Canadians in Saskatoon

May 17, 2018             Saskatoon, SK               Employment and Social Development Canada

Building a strong middle class means giving Canada’s youth the tools they need to find and keep good jobs.

Today, the Honourable Ralph Goodale, Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness, and Member of Parliament for Regina- Wascana, on behalf of the Honourable Patty Hajdu, Minister of Employment, Workforce Development and Labour, announced funding for two projects that will help up to 400 young Canadians develop their skills and get hands-on work experience.

The Government of Canada is providing more than $770,000 to the Saskatoon Trades and Skills Centre for its Skills for a Stronger Community 2017-2020 project through the Skills Link program. Over 31 months, up to 200 participants, including Indigenous youth, recent immigrants and visible minorities, will receive training in employability skills, followed by four weeks of work placements in the construction and related trades.

The Government, in partnership with the Government of Saskatchewan, is also providing more than $2.4 million to Tourism Saskatchewan for its Ready to Work: Tourism and Hospitality Careers project. Over 31 months, up to 200 young people, including Indigenous youth, new Canadians and others at risk, will develop a broad range of skills and knowledge that will help them participate in the labour market. Project activities, which include instruction in necessary employment skills and work experience in the service/tourism industries, will take place in 12 area communities.

Skills Link supports projects that help young people who face more barriers to employment than others get employability skills and gain valuable job experience, which, in turn, helps them make a successful transition into the workforce or go back to school. This could include youth who have not completed high school, single parents, Indigenous youth, youth with disabilities, newcomers or youth living in rural or remote areas.

Quotes

“We know that our communities are healthier and stronger when everyone can fully participate. Supporting youth as they transition into the workforce and giving them the training they need to succeed is a key way in which we can grow our economy and strengthen the middle class.”
– The Honourable Patty Hajdu, Minister of Employment, Workforce Development and Labour

“These two initiatives will help young people who face barriers get the training they need to start in the workforce and become successful in their careers. By making our economy more inclusive, we’re supporting greater prosperity and a stronger middle class. Congratulations to the Saskatoon Trades and Skills Centre and Tourism Saskatchewan for helping our youth realize their potential.”
– The Honourable Ralph Goodale, Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness, and Member of Parliament for Regina-Wascana

“Partnerships have been critical to the Ready to Work program’s success from the beginning. The program is an example of federal and provincial governments working side-by-side to address challenges faced by some of the most vulnerable in our society. Today’s announcement of Government of Canada investment in Ready to Work is reassuring news and will assist participants in gaining skills, experience and confidence.”
– The Honourable Gene Makowsky, Minister Responsible for Tourism Saskatchewan

“The funding provided through the Skills Link program has enabled the Saskatoon Trades and Skills Centre the ability to expand our operational capacity and give more vulnerable youth access to training and employment opportunities.”
– Donavon Elliott, Executive Director, Saskatoon Trades and Skills Centre

Quick facts

  • Canada’s future prosperity depends on young people getting the education and work experience they need to succeed. Each year, the Government invests over $330 million in the Youth Employment Strategy to help young people gain the skills and work experience they need to find and maintain good employment.
  • Through Budget 2018, the Government provides an additional $448.5 million over five years, starting in 2018–19, to the Youth Employment Strategy. This funding will support the continued increase of the number of job placements funded under the Canada Summer Jobs program in 2019–20.
  • Budget 2017 invested an additional $395.5 million over three years. Combined with Budget 2016 measures, these investments will help:·        more than 33,000 vulnerable youth develop the skills they need to find work or go back to school;

    ·        create 15,000 new green jobs for young Canadians; and

    ·        provide over 1,600 new employment opportunities for youth in the heritage sector.

Related products

Associated links

Contacts

Media Relations Office
Employment and Social Development Canada
819-994-5559
media@hrsdc-rhdcc.gc.ca

NT5

Summit highlights the essential role women leaders play in climate action around the world

May 17, 2018 – Gatineau, Québec

In Canada and around the world, women and girls are powerful agents of change, working to improve the lives of their families, their communities and their countries. Globally, women are also at the forefront of climate action, from negotiating an ambitious Paris Climate Agreement and championing solutions to starting clean tech companies and leading sustainable initiatives in business.

In a social media campaign asking Canadians what themes mattered the most to them, we heard the two most important priorities for Canada’s G7 Presidency are working together on climate change, oceans and clean energy and advancing gender equality and women’s empowerment. The participants of the Climate Leaders’ Summit are among the climate leaders committed to shaping ambitious climate policies and making sure that all – especially women and girls – are part of the conversation.

Today, Canada’s Minister of Environment and Climate Change, Catherine McKenna, hosted the Climate Leaders’ Summit: Women Kicking It on Climate to advance climate action and women’s leadership. Participants from G7 countries and the international community, from public, private, academic, indigenous communities and civil society sectors worked together to drive forward solutions that will secure further action on the Paris Agreement, accelerate the transition to a low-carbon economy, and empower women around the world.

Takeaways from this summit – including highlights of the panel discussions and proposed actions – will be reflected in a Chair’s Summary to inform discussions of G7 Ministers at the Environment Ministers’ Meeting this fall and to advance climate action internationally.

Quotes

“I am privileged to work with so many fearless women who are climate leaders. We know women and girls are particularly at risk when it comes to climate change, and yet women are also at the forefront of bold climate leadership around the world. Together, women are turning ideas into solutions that are reducing pollution, making communities more resilient to the impacts of climate change, promoting fair and inclusive climate and energy policy, and ensuring we leave a healthy environment and a strong, clean economy for our kids and grandkids.”

– Catherine McKenna, Minister of Environment and Climate Change

Related products

Associated links

Contacts

Caroline Thériault
Press Secretary
Office of the Minister of Environment and Climate Change
613-462-5473
caroline.theriault2@canada.ca

Media Relations
Environment and Climate Change Canada
819-938-3338 or 1-844-836-7799 (toll free)
ec.media.ec@canada.ca

NT4

Professor addresses whether race should be considered when assigning a course – Global News

Professor Mark Mercer discusses the controversy over a non-indigenous instructor teaching a course on residential schools in Halifax.

Read More: https://globalnews.ca/video/4217195/professor-addresses-whether-race-should-be-considered-when-assigning-a-course/

Securing Canada’s Economic Future: Minister Morneau Speaks at Toronto Region Board of Trade

May 17, 2018 – Toronto, Ontario – Department of Finance Canada

The Government of Canada is focused on the things that matter most to Canadians: growing the economy, creating jobs, strengthening the middle class, and helping everyone working hard to join it. The Government’s investments in Canadians and their communities are good for business and good for middle class jobs.

Finance Minister Bill Morneau today spoke with the Toronto Region Board of Trade about how the Government is securing Canada’s economic future by making investments in skilled workers, modern infrastructure, global trade and science and innovation, as well as by encouraging workforce participation so that Canada can continue to compete globally and succeed. These investments will deliver long-term growth that works for everyone, while ensuring that Canada remains one of the best places in the world to start, grow, and invest in a business.

Earlier this week Minister Morneau announced Government action to support investor confidence by committing to indemnify the Trans Mountain Expansion Project against any financial loss posed by politically motivated unnecessary delays. The completion of this project will create jobs and support Canada’s communities—including Indigenous communities—and benefit all Canadians by providing a safe and efficient means of getting our natural resources to international markets where they will realize greater profits for Canadians. With revenues from this project, governments across Canada will have more to invest in the vital services that Canadians depend on to get ahead.

Quote

“It should be clear to all that Canadians are competitive. They work hard, compete and succeed. The facts show that business confidence and investment is up, and growing faster than it has in five years. And we are taking action to build on that success. By strengthening the internationally competitive environment for Canadian businesses, the Government is attracting investments that contribute to Canada’s economic growth and creating jobs that support families and communities. Getting it right will take an open dialogue based on the facts, and listening to Canadians. I look forward to advancing this dialogue with Canadians in the weeks and months ahead.”

– Bill Morneau, Minister of Finance

Quick Facts

The Government is investing to help Canadians succeed, with:

  • More modern and resilient infrastructure that moves people more efficiently and gets goods to market more quickly and safely.
  • Greater investments in people, so that Canadian workers will gain the skills they need to compete for jobs in the new economy, middle class families will have more help with the high cost of raising their kids, and people working hard to join the middle class will have more opportunities to succeed.
  • Better support for innovation and science, so that Canadian businesses and workers will be more productive, and better able to compete globally.
  • Trade and investment deals that are comprehensive and progressive, so Canadian businesses will have better access to global markets and the billions of customers they represent, and the benefits of growth can be felt by more and more people here at home, and around the world.

Related Products

Media may contact:

Daniel Lauzon
Director of Communications
Office of the Minister of Finance
daniel.lauzon3@canada.ca
613-286-4285

Media Relations
Department of Finance Canada
fin.media-media.fin@canada.ca
613-369-4000

General Enquiries

Phone: 613-369-3710
Facsimile: 613-369-4065
TTY: 613-369-3230
E-mail: fin.financepublic-financepublique.fin@canada.ca

NT5

Ottawa announces $2B fund to help communities withstand natural disasters – CP

Source: The Canadian Press
May 17, 2018

CALGARY _ The federal government has set up a $2-billion fund to help communities protect themselves from natural disasters.

Federal Infrastructure Minister Amarjeet Sohi made the announcement on the Calgary Stampede grounds, which were submerged during heavy flooding in southern Alberta five years ago.

Sohi said the 10-year program will cover projects that help communities withstand natural hazards including floods, wildfires, seismic events and droughts.

He said the money is for large-scale infrastructure projects with a minimum price tag of $20 million such as diversion channels, wetland restorations, wildfire barriers and levees.

Sohi said applications for funding will have until July 31 to submit an expression of interest.

Provinces, municipal and regional governments can all apply, as can public not-for-profit post-secondary institutions, First Nations governments and band councils.

INDEX: NATIONAL DISASTER POLITICS

Fingas: Lack of action on poverty contributing to cycle of apprehending Indigenous children – The Province

Apprehension is traceable to “neglect” — referring to poverty and deprivation which arises due to historical patterns of discrimination

Last week, a Federal Court hearing in Saskatoon resulted in one step being taken to respond to the Sixties Scoop — the system in which children were intentionally removed from Indigenous parents to be placed with white families.

But neither the hearing itself nor the approved class action settlement managed to avoid provoking some controversy. To the contrary, both served largely to signal how much more there is to be done to ensure that Indigenous families have the basic opportunities which most Canadians take for granted.

Read More: http://theprovince.com/opinion/columnists/lack-of-action-on-poverty-contributing-to-cycle-of-apprehending-indigenous-children/wcm/5ce61ec7-21fd-4680-bac8-0d3921fdf102

The Daily Friday, May 18, 2018

Consumer Price Index, April 2018

The Consumer Price Index rose 2.2% on a year-over-year basis in April, following a 2.3% increase in March. On a seasonally adjusted monthly basis, the Consumer Price Index was up 0.1% in April, matching the increase in March.

Continue reading 

Retail trade, March 2018

Retail sales increased for the third consecutive month in March, rising 0.6% to $50.2 billion. Higher sales at motor vehicle and parts dealers more than offset lower sales at food and beverage stores and gasoline stations.

Continue reading 

Pipeline transportation of oil and other liquid petroleum products, March 2018

Pipelines received 22.0 million cubic metres of crude oil and equivalent products from Canadian fields and plants in March, up 4.1% compared with the same month in 2017. The vast majority originated in Alberta (86.2%), followed by Saskatchewan (10.9%).

Continue reading 

Sawmills, February 2018

Lumber production fell 9.2% from January to 5 293.0 thousand cubic metres of lumber in February. Production was 2.5% lower than in February 2017.

Continue reading 

Exports of grains by final destination, March 2018

Data on exports of grains by final destination are now available for March.

Continue reading 

New products

The Consumer Price Index, April 2018, vol. 97, no. 4

Catalogue number Catalogue number62-001-X, (HTML | PDF)

NT4

Challenging the way Canadians view Indigenous people when defending their lands | APTN News

Credits:APTN News

Angry protestor, or grieving land and water protector?

A researcher in Labrador who witnessed the Muskrat Falls protests in 2016, is challenging the way many Canadians understand Indigenous people defending their lands.

Here’s part one of a two-part feature on ecological grief and the state’s response from APTN Reporter, Justin Brake.

The REDress exhibit calls for reflection on missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls

The exhibit was part of the Atamiskākēwak National Gathering 2018, which was held in Moose Jaw

Between April 23 and 28, Sask Polytech’s Moose Jaw campus featured a haunting display of nearly 30 red dresses, hung both inside and outside, and ten banners with a total of 306 photos and stories of some of the missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls.

“According to certain Dakota spiritual beliefs, the colour red is sacred and is the only colour spirits can see,” says Rosemarie Zaba Stewart, Sask Polytech Indigenous Student Advisor and curator of the REDress exhibit. “The intent is that the spirits of the Indigenous women and girls who are no longer with us will see the dresses and know that they have not been forgotten.”

The REDress exhibit concept was originally created by Winnipeg-based Métis artist Jamie Black as an aesthetic response to the thousands of missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls in Canada. The exhibit in Moose Jaw was curated as part of Saskatchewan Polytechnic’s contribution to the “Shaking hands in greeting with each other” Atamiskākēwak National Gathering 2018.

“Locals as well as people from across Canada from Nova Scotia, Newfoundland, Ontario, Alberta, Manitoba, British Columbia, Nunavut, NWT, to the USA signed the guest book,” says Zaba Stewart. “Their comments ranged from echoes of sadness, despair, and loss to expressions of hope, encouragement, and thankfulness for the provocative and impactful exhibit.”

More about about the Atamiskākēwak National Gathering 2018.

NT5

NOSM Holds Board Retreat in Parry Sound

The Northern Ontario School of Medicine (NOSM) held its annual Board of Directors retreat in Parry Sound, Ontario on May 10 – 11, 2018.

During the two-day meeting, Board members participated in several presentations and interactive sessions which included topics relating to the School’s mission of educating high quality physicians and health professionals, and achieving international recognition as a leader in distributed, learning-centred, community-engaged education and research.

Day one included updates on the School’s MD program, the Academic Health Sciences Network, Research and the compendium of research activity in Northern Ontario, and highlights from the Indigenous Affairs and Francophone Affairs Units.

Dr. Sarah Newbery, rural physician, NOSM Associate Professor, and VP Clinical, North West Local Health Integration Network and Mr. Jim Whaley, provided an overview of work being done as a result of Summit North: Building a Flourishing Physician Workforce held in Thunder Bay on January 24, 2018.

In the evening, NOSM Board members enjoyed a Traditional Muskoka Dinner at the Rocky Crest Resort with local community members. Following dinner, Dr. Tim Redmond, Assistant Professor with the Northern Ontario School of Medicine and President of the Physician Clinical Teachers’ Association (PCTA) spoke about the town of Parry Sound, and the importance of NOSM as a unifying agent for health care quality, accessibility and innovation in the North.

At the formal Board meeting on the second day, Directors received a Financial Report for the 11-month period ending March 31, 2018. In addition, the Board approved the proposed balanced budget of $46.22 million for the fiscal year May 1, 2018 to April 30, 2019.

Dr. Pierre Zundel, Chair of the Board of Directors, acknowledged the School’s progress across Northern Ontario and said, “On behalf of the Board, we are grateful for the network of people, partnerships, communities and volunteers who have contributed to NOSM’s achievement in providing access to health care.”

NOSM Board members later joined members of the Federation of Northern Ontario Municipalities (FONOM) in a plenary session titled “2020 Vision, Reaching Beyond Extraordinary Together.” Speakers included Dr. Catherine Cervin, NOSM Vice Dean, Academic; Dr. Penny Moody-Corbett, NOSM Senior Associate Dean, Associate Dean, Research and Interim Associate Dean, Community Engagement; and, Dr. Alex Anawati, Charter Class alumnus, ER Physician, faculty member, and NOSM Board member. The plenary was moderated by Dr. Roger Strasser, NOSM Dean and CEO.

The Board retreat ended with a tour of the of the West Parry Sound Health Centre (WPSHC) where Jim Hanna, Public Relations and Communications Director, explained why the community shares in the excitement of NOSM’s academic success.

“Our community is fully engaged with NOSM and its learners because we will not be passive recipients of the School’s many benefits,” said Mr. Hanna. “We believe that social accountability is a shared responsibility, and this approach has inspired the culture of learning within our community as we actively participate in the future of health care for our people.”

The next meeting of the Board of Directors and the Annual Meeting of Members is scheduled to occur on September 19, 2018.

For a complete list of Board members, please visit our website at nosm.ca/board.

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The Northern Ontario School of Medicine is committed to the education of high quality physicians and health professionals, and to international recognition as a leader in distributed, learning-centered, community-engaged education and research.

Kimberley Larkin
Communications Officer
Phone: 705-662-7243
Email: klarkin@nosm.ca

NT4

Provincial Government Hosts National Seal Products Day

May 17, 2018

The Craft Council of Newfoundland and Labrador recognized National Seal Products Day today with an event hosted by the Provincial Government, and supported by the Government of Nunavut, as well as many industry sponsors. Provincial craft producers gathered to exhibit their seal products as part of a celebration of the economic, cultural, and environmental importance of a sustainable seal hunt.

The event mirrors federal recognition of National Seal Products Day, an occasion that was officially designated by federal law last year, and was created to provide opportunity for craft producers and industry partners to showcase beautiful seal-based products and support the sealing industry.

The occasion was recognized by the Honourable Dwight Ball, Premier of Newfoundland and Labrador; the Honourable Paul Quassa, Premier of Nunavut; Speaker of the House of Assembly Perry Trimper; Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs and Member of Parliament for Labrador Yvonne Jones; Inshore Director of the Fish Food and Allied Workers – Unifor Union Bill Broderick; and Chair of the Craft Council of Newfoundland and Labrador Joan Kane, all of whom spoke to the economic, cultural, and environmental importance of the sealing industry.

Last year, more than 80,000 seals were landed in Newfoundland and Labrador, an increase of 22 per cent over the previous year. Those landings generated $2 million as raw product, and not only created income for harvesters, but also supported more than 50 processing jobs. While generating that value, the seal hunt also helped manage the Northwest Atlantic harp seal population, which is currently estimated to be 7.4 million animals.

Federal recognition of National Seal Products Day will take place in Ottawa later this month.

Quotes

“Sealing and seal products are a source of pride for our province, and hold the promise of even greater social, economic, and environmental benefits in the future as we help people develop a better understanding of the industry, and the sustainable manner in which it is conducted. I commend the Craft Council of Newfoundland and Labrador for organizing this event, and I thank everyone playing a role in advocating for and advancing this important industry both nationally, and around the world.”

Honourable Dwight Ball
Premier of Newfoundland and Labrador

“We are very excited to be working with various jurisdictions to create an event that celebrates craft producers who work with Sealskin and Seal Products, and the sealing industry. The many talented makers we have as members work tirelessly to promote the education of the Seal Industry and as a result have seen an increase in demand for products from the combined efforts. We thank the Provincial Government for hosting our event, and we applaud all of the efforts of the overall Industry.”

Joan Kane
Chair of the Craft Council of Newfoundland and Labrador

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Learn more
The Craft Council of Newfoundland and Labrador – craftcouncil.nl.ca

Follow us on Twitter: @GovNL

Media contact
Michelle Cannizzaro
Office of the Premier
709-729-3960
michellecannizzaro@gov.nl.ca

NT5

Tory bill gives Indigenous hunters exemption from night hunting ban – Brandon Sun

While asserting that night hunting is a dangerous practice, the provincial government isn’t looking to outright ban the act for everyone, according to proposed legislation.

Instead, the Wildlife Amendment Act (Bill 29), tabled on Wednesday, “would allow Indigenous hunters to exercise their right to hunt at night in designated areas by obtaining a night hunting permit,” according to a government release.

During a teleconference shortly after the legislation was introduced, Sustainable Development Minister Rochelle Squires said there isn’t a disconnect between public safety and maintaining Indigenous rights.

This, despite Manitoba Wildlife Federation managing director Brian Kotak stating during a press conference in Winnipeg that “there is no place for night hunting that can be safe.”

Read More: https://www.brandonsun.com/local/tory-bill-gives-indigenous-hunters-exemption-from-night-hunting-ban-482879553.html

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