Law Society announces 2022 award recipients

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Law Society announces 2022 award recipients

by ahnationtalk on March 21, 2022123 Views

March 21, 2022

TORONTO, ON — Members of Ontario’s legal professions will be recognized for their outstanding career achievements and contributions to their communities at the annual Law Society Awards ceremony, which will be held on May 25, 2022.

An in-person ceremony hosted by Treasurer Teresa Donnelly will be attended by the recipients and their invited guests. The webcast will be available for all others to view at: LSO.ca/2022AwardsEvent.

“The Law Society awards recognize excellence” said Law Society Treasurer Teresa Donnelly. “The work, commitment and dedication of this year’s outstanding recipients enhance the public perception of the legal professions, promote the public interest and inspire all of us.”

The awards presented in May will include: The William J. Simpson Distinguished Paralegal Award, The Lincoln Alexander Award, The Laura Legge Award, The J. Shirley Denison Award and The Law Society Medal.

The following highlights the achievements of the 2022 recipients:

William J. Simpson Distinguished Paralegal Award
Paula Callaghan Licensed in 2011, Paula Callaghan has demonstrated professionalism and outstanding achievement in her private practice, as well as a devotion to her duties in the field. Ms. Callaghan is the former Chair of the Paralegal Committee of the County of Carleton Law Association (CCLA) and the newly elected Paralegal Trustee to the Board of Directors. She is the 2021 recipient of the CCLA Paralegal Award and has helped to make paralegals valued members of the association.

Lincoln Alexander Award
Lawrence Greenspon Called to the Bar in 1980, Lawrence Greenspon is highly respected in the Ottawa legal community. Described as “a champion of the underdog” — he works tirelessly to advocate for his clients. Despite his busy legal practice, Mr. Greenspon is one of the most well-known philanthropists in Ottawa. He is involved in countless charities and community programs that range from local initiatives to global ones.

Laura Legge Award
Marian Jacko Called to the Bar in 1998, Marian Jacko has made significant contributions to the legal professions by advancing access to justice for children, youth, Indigenous communities, victims of crime, and survivors of human trafficking. As the first Indigenous person appointed as the Children’s Lawyer for Ontario, Ms. Jacko is a trailblazer, leaving important footprints for Indigenous youth and younger lawyers to follow.

J. Shirley Denison Award
Professor François Larocque Called to the Bar in 2002, François Larocque is a lawyer (Power Law) and professor at the University of Ottawa Faculty of Law. As the Research Chair on Language Rights, Professor Larocque undertakes research, testifies and presents reports to provincial and federal parliamentary committees and engages directly with community organizations to develop and improve Canadian jurisprudence and legislation that protect language rights.

Law Society Medal
Beth Beattie Called to the Bar in 1994, Beth Beattie has become an agent of change in the mental health space within the legal professions. She has helped thousands by sharing her lived mental health experience and continues to lead discussions about how to make a cultural change in the legal community when it comes to conversations about mental health. Through her advocacy, Ms. Beattie has made an immeasurable impact by promoting awareness, compassion and inclusion in the legal community and beyond.

Christopher Bredt Called to the Bar in 1984, Christopher Bredt has made exceptional contributions to the legal profession in Ontario through his work with the Law Society, government, legal education, his pro bono and charitable work, and as a practicing lawyer and mentor. He is known as a skilled and fearless advocate, who exemplifies the profession’s values of integrity, collegiality and civility.

Brian Gover Called to the Bar in 1983, Brian Gover is widely recognized as one of Canada’s top advocates. He started his career in public service and moved to private practice in 1994. Mr. Gover is committed to education and mentorship, and has a deep appreciation of how the law works — his healthy curiosity keeps him at the forefront of change.

Lorin MacDonald (She/Her) Called to the Bar in 2010, Lorin MacDonald is a renowned human rights lawyer, disability expert and accessibility inclusion changemaker. Her notable accomplishments include introducing captioning to Western University, various courts and tribunals, and the Law Society of Ontario. A dedicated volunteer, Ms. MacDonald has lent her expertise to the Ontario Courts Accessibility Committee for People with Disabilities and the Law Society’s Equity Advisory Group, among many others.

Deepa Mattoo Called to the Bar of Ontario in 2011 and India in 1998, Deepa Mattoo is described as a “feminist lawyer” — a leader in women’s issues. She is currently the Executive Director of the Barbra Schlifer Commemorative Clinic, a multi-service agency in Toronto that provides trauma-informed legal, counselling and interpretation services to racialized and marginalized populations of women.

Professor Albert Oosterhoff Called to the Bar in 1966, Professor Albert Oosterhoff (Professor Emeritus, University of Western Ontario) is renowned as a leading legal scholar and author in the area of trusts and estates in Canada. His publication record spans 50 years and his work is regularly cited by the courts, academics, lawyers, students and policy-makers both nationally and internationally.

Stuart Wuttke Called to the Bar of Manitoba in 1996 and Ontario in 2006, Stuart Wuttke is a leader in Indigenous rights and policy reform. He is a fierce yet humble advocate, dedicated to public service. Mr. Wuttke’s expertise and involvement on the national stage in First Nations law has lent itself to the significant progress for First Nations and the advancement of reconciliation in Canada.

The Law Society regulates lawyers and paralegals in Ontario in the public interest. The Law Society has a mandate to protect the public interest, to maintain and advance the cause of justice and the rule of law, to facilitate access to justice for the people of Ontario and to act in a timely, open and efficient manner.

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