Tackling First Nations Addictions Through Culture

Tackling First Nations Addictions Through Culture

by ahnationtalk on August 6, 20151718 Views

TPF_logo uos_logo

Tackling First Nations addictions through culture

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

SASKATOON, SK (June 25, 2015) – The leading authority on Indigenous addictions research in Canada is changing its name, forming a new partnership and launching a new way to measure wellness and the impact of culture in addressing substance abuse issues for First Nations. The Thunderbird Partnership Foundation is the result of a merger between the National Native Addictions Partnership Foundation (NNAPF) and the Native Mental Health Association of Canada.

“Drug and alcohol addictions among Indigenous people is a serious health concern in Canada,” says Board President, Chief Austin Bear of the Muskoday First Nation. He says a recent federal study found that a third of First Nations clients who entered treatment were diagnosed or suspected of having a mental health disorder.

“The new Thunderbird Partnership Foundation reflects the coming together of substance use and wellness issues in a vision for a continuum of care that is grounded in First Nations culture,” says Dr. Brenda Restoule of the Native Mental Health Association of Canada (NMHAC). Restoule also says the new partnership is an expression of the strengths of First Nations people who are working towards wellness with great courage.

Today’s announcement includes the launch of the highly-anticipated Native Wellness Assessment, which is a first for Canada. “Much of what we do in health research focuses on examining deficits and weaknesses. But now, for the first time, Indigenous treatment programs and centres across Canada will be able to measure wellness of the whole person based on their strengths,” says Carol Hopkins, Executive Director of the Thunderbird Partnership Foundation.

Western treatment practices generally take a narrow view of the addiction, instead of the overall wellness from a holistic perspective. Health for First Nations is broadly envisioned as wellness and is understood to exist where there is physical, emotional, mental, and spiritual harmony.

It is recognized at accredited National Native Alcohol and Drug Abuse Program (NNADAP) and Youth Solvent Addiction Program (YSAP) treatment centres that Indigenous traditional culture is vital for client healing. Over time, the use of Native

Wellness Assessment will establish an evidence base for the important role of Indigenous culture in addressing substance use issues and in promoting wellness.

The Native Wellness Assessment will provide culturally-based information to guide treatment services, which can include spending time on the land, learning from traditional teachers and healers, as well as participating in storytelling, and dancing. A pilot test of the assessment tool reports positive outcomes, including the revelation that clients who knew their own language reported higher overall levels of wellness.

“We are happy to have a new national addiction information management system in place that will capture the evidence from the Native Wellness Assessment,” says Hopkins.

Together with its partners, the University of Saskatchewan, the Assembly of First Nations, and the Centre for Addictions and Mental Health, the Thunderbird Partnership Foundation will continue to advocate for and support the implementation of the First Nations Mental Wellness Continuum and the Honouring our Strengths Renewal Framework.

Today’s media launch was held at at the Saskatoon Inn, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan.

To schedule an interview with the Thunderbird Partnership Foundation, contact Sherry Huff, 519-401-5166, [email protected].

Visit our new website, thunderbirdpf.org, or join the conversation on Twitter, @ ThunderbirdPF, #CultureIsStrength. Also look for us on Facebook and Pinterest.

-30-

Backgrounder

NNAPF/National Native Addictions Partnership Foundation

The National Native Addictions Partnership Foundation Inc. is committed to working with First Nations and Inuit to further the capacity of communities to address substance use and addiction. Culture is central and foundational to NNAPF, which focuses on promoting a holistic approach to healing and wellness that values culture, respect, community, and compassion. Our top priority is developing a continuum of care that would be available to all Indigenous people in Canada.

NMHAC/Native Mental Health Association of Canada

The Native Mental Health Association of Canada (NMHS) is a national not-for-profit association that is governed and managed by Aboriginal leaders and exists to improve the lives of Canada’s First Nations, Métis and Inuit populations by addressing healing, wellness, and other mental health challenges. NMHAC, established in 1975, grew out of the Canadian Psychiatric Association Section on Native Mental Health under the leadership of the late Dr. Clare Brant, Canada’s first Indigenous psychiatrist

HOS/Honouring Our Strengths

The Honouring Our Strengths: A Renewed Framework to Address Substance Use Issues Among First Nations People in Canada (HOS) document is the framework for a continuum of care. It identifies First Nations culture as central to making a substantial difference in addressing substance use and mental health issues. Developed through national dialogue, the HOS Renewal framework set the mandate for this very important research funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) and NNAPF. The vision outlined in the framework is one that supports a strengths-based, systems approach to addressing substance use issues among First Nations in Canada. This vision recognizes that a strengthened system of care is the shared responsibility of various jurisdictions (community, provincial, federal) as well as a wide-range of care providers including family and community members, community service providers, primary care and other medical staff and off-reserve service providers. This vision emphasises that people, families and communities have access to a range of effective, culturally-relevant care options at any point in their healing journey.

The Honouring our Strengths: Indigenous Culture as Intervention in Addictions Treatment (CASI) research project is a collaboration between NNAPF, the University of Saskatchewan, the Assembly of First Nations and the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health. the aim of this community-based research team’s work was to develop an Indigenous knowledge based wellness assessment instrument that can demonstrate the effectiveness of First Nations culture as a health intervention in addressing substance use and mental health issues.

FNMWC/First Nations Mental Wellness Continuum

The First Nations Mental Wellness Continuum framework is built upon the Honour our Strengths: Indigenous Culture as Intervention in Addictions Treatment (CASI) research project’s vision for mental wellness. Mental wellness is a state of well-being and balance in which the individual can realize his or her own potential, cope with the normal stresses of life, and contribute to her or his own community. This balance is maintained when individuals have purpose in their daily lives, hope for the future, a sense of belonging and understand the meaning of creation.

The First Nations Mental Wellness Continuum Framework Team has been selected to receive the Deputy Minister’s Award for Excellence 2015 in the Innovation and Creativity category for the impact they are having in the health field.

Chief Austin Bear, President, Thunderbird Partnership Foundation

Chief Austin Bear of the Muskoday First Nation has long demonstrated leadership in addictions; in the community, provincially, nationally and internationally. Chief Bear’s involvement with NNADAP began when he held the position of Coordinator/Community Worker for the Muskoday First Nation. In the five years of service to NNADAP, he developed alcohol and substance abuse prevention programming for the community. Chief Bear has enjoyed more than 25 years of sobriety and is a Certified Addictions Counsellor. He has also served as the Chief of Muskoday First Nation for 25 years, and was elected in 1991.

Carol Hopkins, Executive Director, Thunderbird Partnership Foundation

Carol is a member of the Wolf Clan, and is from the Delaware First Nation of Moraviantown, Ontario. Carol came to this position from Nimkee NupiGawagan Healing Centre Inc., a youth solvent abuse treatment centre that is founded on Indigenous culture and life ways, where she was the founding Director for 13 years. She is the recipient of the Canadian Alliance on Mental Illness and Mental Health (CAMIMH)’s Champions of Mental Health 2015 Award for raising awareness of the role of Indigenous culture in addressing substance use and mental health issues among First Nations in Canada.

Dr. Brenda Restoule

Dr. Brenda Restoule, is a registered clinical psychologist who specializes in clinical and community development for Indigenous populations. Her area of expertise has led her to consult with government agencies, author teaching materials, participate in Indigenous research and speak to international audiences. She is the current chair of the Native Mental Health Association of Canada, where she has been involved for nearly 20 years. Dr. Restoule is from Dokis First Nation, in Ontario, and graduated from the University of Western Ontario and Queen’s University.

Dr. Colleen Dell

Colleen Anne Dell Ph.D. was appointed as the Research Chair in Substance Abuse at the University of Saskatchewan in 2007. Funded by the Government of Saskatchewan, her work concentrates on research, community outreach and training. Along with being the Research Chair in Substance Abuse, Dr. Dell is a Professor in the Department of Sociology and School of Public Health. She is also a Senior Research Associate with the Canadian Centre on Substance.

Abuse, Canada’s national non-governmental addictions agency. Dr. Dell is an Adjunct Professor in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at Carleton University and a Research Associate with the Indigenous Peoples’ Health Research Centre.

NNADAP/YSAP Treatment Centres

The National Native Alcohol and Drug Abuse Program (NNADAP) and Youth Solvent Addiction Program (YSAP) treatment centres participating in this national research project to produce the native wellness assessment are accredited with standards of excellence through various nationally recognized accreditation organizations such as the Canadian Accreditation Council and Accreditation Canada. This speaks to the capacity and strength of the NNADAP and YSAP treatment centres. There are more NNADAP and YSAP treatment centres with this type of accreditation than mainstream treatment centres across Canada. 12 NNADAP/YSAP Treatment Centres were involved in piloting the new Native Wellness Assessment.

Indigenous Wellness Framework

The Indigenous Wellness Framework identifies hope, belonging, meaning and purpose as measurable indicators of wellness (NNAPF, 2015). Spiritual wellness is achieved through the presence of indigenous values, identity and belief and the result is Hope. Emotional wellness is achieved through relationships, a connection to family, community and having an attitude towards living; the result of which is Belonging. It should be noted that “family” is inclusive of extended family, culturally-defined relationships with those outside of one’s bloodline such as clan family, and most significantly family is inclusive of “other-than-human-beings’ such as land, and beings of creation. Mental wellness is not an all-encompassing concept and is used in this framework to describe one aspect of our being – our mind. Mental wellness is achieved through rational and intuitive thought and as these two aspects of thought are women together to create understanding; the outcome of which is Meaning for and about life. Finally, physical wellness is achieved through an indigenous way of being and living life with wholeness; the outcome of which is Purpose (Dumont 2015).

————————————-

Lutte contre les toxicomanies chez les Premières Nations par le biais de la culture

POUR DIFFUSION IMMÉDIATE

SASKATOON, SK (le 25 juin 2015) – La première autorité en matière de recherche sur la toxicomanie chez les autochtones au Canada a changé de raison sociale, formé un nouveau partenariat et lancé une nouvelle façon de mesurer le mieux-être et l’incidence de la culture sur la lutte contre les problèmes de toxicomanie chez les Premières Nations. La Thunderbird Partnership Foundation est née d’une fusion entre la Fondation autochtone nationale de partenariat pour la lutte contre les dépendances (FANPLD) et l’Association autochtone de la santé mentale du Canada.

Aux dires du président du conseil d’administration, le chef Austin Bear de la Première Nation de Muskoday, « La dépendance à l’alcool et aux drogues chez les autochtones constitue un problème de santé grave au Canada. » Ce dernier cite une étude fédérale récente faisant état de ce qu’un tiers de clients des Premières Nations accédant au traitement, ont reçu un diagnostic de trouble de santé mentale ou soupçonnés d’en être atteints.

Selon la Dre Brenda Restoule de l’Association autochtone de la santé mentale du Canada, « La nouvelle Thunderbird Partnership Foundation reflète la mise en commun des questions liées à la consommation abusive de substances et au mieux-être dans une vision de continuum de soins fondés sur la culture des Premières Nations. » Cette dernière fait également valoir que le nouveau partenariat est une expression des atouts des Premières Nations, lesquelles s’efforcent avec tant de courage à promouvoir le mieux-être.

L’annonce d’aujourd’hui comprend le lancement de la très attendue Évaluation du mieux-être des autochtones, une première au Canada. « Très souvent, la plupart de nos recherches en matière de santé s’attardent beaucoup trop sur des déficiences et des faiblesses. Mais dorénavant, pour la première fois, des programmes et centres de traitement autochtones partout au Canada seront à même de mesurer le mieux-être d’une personne dans sa totalité en fonction de ses atouts », explique Carol Hopkins, directrice générale de la Thunderbird Partnership Foundation.

En générale, les pratiques de traitement occidentales adoptent une vision plutôt restreinte de la toxicomanie, au lieu de considérer le mieux-être de la personne d’un point de vue holistique. Chez les Premières Nations, la santé au sens large renvoie au mieux-être d’un membre, ainsi qu’à l’harmonie physique, émotionnelle, mentale et spirituelle dont jouit ce dernier.

Dans des centres de traitement agrées du Programme national de lutte contre l’abus de l’alcool et des drogues chez les Autochtones (PNLAADA) et du Programme national de lutte contre l’abus de solvants chez les jeunes (PNLASJ), l’on reconnaît que la culture traditionnelle autochtone revêt une importance vitale dans la guérison du client. Au fil du temps, l’Évaluation du mieux-être des autochtones permettra d’établir une base de données probantes sur le rôle important de la culture autochtone dans le traitement des toxicomanes et la promotion du mieux-être.

L’Évaluation du mieux-être des autochtones servira à orienter les services de traitement en mettant la disposition de ceux-ci des renseignements culturels, notamment ceux liés au temps passé dans la nature, à l’apprentissage auprès des enseignants traditionnels et des guérisseurs, ainsi qu’à la participation aux séances de contes et à la danse. Un essai pilote de l’outil d’évaluation a révélé des résultats positifs, et le fait que les clients maîtrisant leur propre langue ont rapporté des niveaux plus élevés de mieux-être.

« Nous sommes heureux de disposer d’un nouveau système national de gestion des informations sur les toxicomanies qui permettra de saisir les éléments de preuve issus de l’Évaluation du mieux-être des autochtones », a fait valoir Madame Hopkins.

De concert avec ses partenaires, l’Université de la Saskatchewan, l’Assemblée des Premières Nations et le Centre de toxicomanie et de santé mentale, la Thunderbird Partnership Foundation continuera à promouvoir et soutenir la mise en œuvre du Cadre du continuum du mieux-être mental des Premières Nations, ainsi que le Cadre renouvelé Honorer nos forces.

Le lancement médiatique d’aujourd’hui a eu lieu au Saskatoon Inn, Saskatoon (Saskatchewan).

Pour convenir d’une contacter Sherry Huff [email protected].

entrevue avec la Thunderbird Partnership Foundation, veuillez au numéro de téléphone: 519-401-5166, ou à l’adresse courriel :

Visitez notre nouveau site Internet, thunderbirdpf.org ou alors joignez-vous à la conversation sur Twitter: @ ThunderbirdPF, #CultureIsStrength. Vous pouvez aussi nous trouver sur Facebook et sur Pinterest.

Document d’information

La FANPLD/Fondation autochtone nationale de partenariat pour la lutte contre les dépendances

La Fondation autochtone nationale de partenariat pour la lutte contre les dépendances s’engage à travailler avec les Premières Nations et les Inuits afin de renforcer la capacité des collectivités à lutter contre la

consommation de substances et la toxicomanie. La culture est au cœur et à la base des champs d’intervention de la FANPLD, laquelle œuvre pour la promotion d’une approche holistique à la guérison et au mieux-être, attachant une grande valeur à la culture, à la communauté, au respect et à la compassion. Notre priorité absolue est de mettre au point un continuum de soins auxquels tous les peuples autochtones au Canada pourraient accéder.

NMHAC/Native Mental Health Association of Canada – Association autochtone de la santé mentale du Canada

L’Association autochtone de la santé mentale du Canada est une association nationale à but non lucratif, dirigée et gérée par des dirigeants autochtones et ayant pour objectif d’améliorer la qualité de vie des Premières nations, Métis et Inuits du Canada, en s’attaquant aux défis liés à la guérison, au mieux-être et à la santé mentale. La NMHAC est issue de la section santé mentale des Autochtones de l’Association des psychiatres du Canada, formée en 1975 sous la direction du regretté Dr Clare Brant, premier psychiatre autochtone au Canada.

HNF/Honorer nos forces

Le document Honorer nos forces : Cadre renouvelé du programme de lutte contre les toxicomanies chez les Premières nations du Canada est le cadre de continuum de soins selon lequel la culture joue un rôle essentiel dans la lutte contre les problèmes de toxicomanie et de santé mentale. Mis au point suivant un processus de dialogue national, le Cadre renouvelé HNF définit le mandat de cette recherche fort importante financée par les instituts de recherche en santé du Canada (IRSC) et la FANPLD. Il décrit une vision qui s’applique à un continuum de services et d’aides complets visant à orienter les interventions communautaires, régionales et nationales en matière de toxicomanie auprès des peuples des Premières nations au Canada. Cette vision reconnaît que le renforcement du système de soins incombe à la fois à diverses compétences (à l’échelon communautaire, provincial et fédéral) et aux nombreux fournisseurs de soins, y compris la famille et les membres de la communauté, les fournisseurs de services communautaires, les professionnels de soins primaires, le personnel médical et les fournisseurs de services

à l’extérieur des réserves. Dans le cadre de cette vision, on tente surtout de s’assurer que les personnes, les familles et les communautés bénéficient des options de soins les plus efficaces et appropriées sur le plan culturel à toutes les étapes de leur processus de guérison.

Le projet de recherche Honorer nos forces: La Culture comme Intervention dans le traitement des toxicomanies (CasI) est le fruit d’une collaboration entre la FANPLD, l’Université de la Saskatchewan, l’Assemblée des Premières Nations et le Centre de toxicomanie et de santé mentale. La tâche de cette équipe de recherche communautaire consistait à mettre au point un outil d’évaluation de mieux-être fondé sur les savoirs autochtones, pouvant démontrer l’efficacité de la culture des Premières Nations en tant qu’intervention sanitaire dans la lutte contre les problèmes de toxicomanie et de santé mentale.

CCMMPN/Cadre du continuum du mieux-être mental des Premières Nations

Le Cadre du continuum du mieux-être mental des Premières Nations s’inspire de la vision du mieux-être mental articulée par le projet de recherche Honorer nos forces: La Culture comme Intervention dans  toxicomanies (CasI). Le mieux-être mental est un état de bien-être et d’équilibre dans lequel l’individu peut réaliser son propre potentiel, surmonter les tensions normales de la vie et apporter une contribution positive dans sa collectivité. Cet équilibre est maintenu lorsque les gens ont un but dans leur vie quotidienne, espoir en l’avenir, un sentiment d’appartenance et comprennent le sens de la création. L’équipe du Cadre du continuum du mieux-être mental des Premières Nations a été retenue pour recevoir le Prix d’excellence 2015 du sous-ministre dans la catégorie Innovation et créativité pour l’impact de son travail dans le domaine de la santé.

Le chef Austin Bear, président, Thunderbird Partnership Foundation

Le chef Austin Bear de la Première Nation de Muskoday a pendant longtemps fait preuve de leadership en matière de lutte contre les toxicomanies, tant à l’échelle communautaire, provinciale, nationale qu’internationale. L’implication du chef Bear auprès du PNLAADA commence lorsqu’il occupa le poste de coordonnateur/travailleur communauté à la Première Nation de Muskoday. Durant ses cinq années au service du PNLAADA, il a élaboré des programmes de prévention d’alcoolisme et de toxicomanie au sein de la communauté. Le chef Bear connaît plus de 25 ans de sobriété et il est conseiller agréé en toxicomanie. Élu en 1991, il est depuis lors chef de la Première Nation de Muskoday.

Carol Hopkins, directrice générale, Thunderbird Partnership Foundation

Originaire de la Première nation Delaware de Moraviantown, Ontario, Carol est membre du Clan du Loup. Avant d’occuper le poste de Directrice générale, elle fut pendant 13 ans la directrice fondatrice du Nimkee NupiGawagan Healing Centre Inc. – un centre de traitement de l’abus de solvants chez les jeunes, fondé sur la culture et le mode de vie autochtones. Carol a remporté le prix des Champions de la santé mentale 2015 de l’Alliance canadienne pour la maladie mentale et la santé mentale (ACMMSM) pour son travail de sensibilisation au rôle de la culture autochtone dans la lutte contre les toxicomanies et des troubles de santé mentale chez les Premières Nations au Canada.

Dre Brenda Restoule

La Dre Brenda Restoule est psychologue clinicienne agréée, spécialiste en développement clinique et communautaire auprès des populations autochtones – un domaine d’expertise qui lui a permis de travailler étroitement avec des organismes gouvernementaux, publier des matériels pédagogiques, prendre part à des études sur les autochtones et prendre la parole devant des publics internationaux. Elle est actuellement présidente de l’Association autochtone de la santé mentale du Canada, association au sein de laquelle elle a été active pendant 20 ans. Mme Restoule est originaire de la Première nation Dokis en Ontario, et elle est diplômée de l’Université Western Ontario et de l’Université Queens.

Dre Colleen Dell

Colleen Anne Dell, Ph.D fut nommée en 2007 titulaire de la Chaire de recherche en toxicomanie de l’Université de la Saskatchewan. Financé par le gouvernement de la Saskatchewan, son travail porte sur la recherche, la sensibilisation communautaire et la formation. En plus d’être titulaire de la Chaire de recherche en toxicomanie, Mme Dell est professeure au département de sociologie et à l’École de santé publique dans la même université. Elle est également associée principale de recherche au Centre canadien de lutte contre l’alcoolisme et les toxicomanies, l’organisme national canadien de renseignements sur les toxicomanies; professeure auxiliaire au département de sociologie et d’anthropologie de l’Université Carleton et chercheuse associée au Centre de recherche sur la santé des Autochtones.

Centres de traitement du PNLAADA/PNLASJ

Les centres de traitement du Programme national de lutte contre l’abus de l’alcool et des drogues chez les Autochtones

(PNLAADA) et du Programme national de lutte contre l’abus de solvants chez les jeunes (PNLASJ) prenant part au projet de recherche national pour mettre au point l’outil d’évaluation du mieux-être des autochtones sont des centres agréés selon les normes d’excellence en la matière par divers organismes d’accréditation reconnus au niveau national, tels que le Conseil canadien d’agrément et Accréditation Canada. Cela témoigne de la capacité et la force des centres de traitement du PNLAADA et du PNLASJ. Par rapport à d’autres centres de traitement grand public partout au Canada, on dénombre plus de centres de traitement PNLAADA/PNLASJ ayant ce type d’agrément. 12 Centres de traitement du PNLAADA/PNLASJ ont participé à l’essai du nouvel outil d’évaluation du mieux-être des autochtones.

Cadre de mieux-être autochtone

Le cadre de bien-être autochtone recense espoir, appartenance, sens et but comme constituant des indicateurs mesurables de mieux-être (FANPLD, 2015). Le mieux-être spirituel n’est atteint que grâce à des valeurs, l’identité et la croyance autochtones ayant pour résultat l’espoir. Le mieux-être émotionnel est atteint à travers des relations, l’entretien de liens avec sa famille et sa communauté et en ayant une attitude vis-à-vis de la vie ; ce qui a pour résultat l’appartenance. Il convient de noter que par « famille », on entend la famille élargie, la famille définie du point de vue culturel, dont des relations avec ceux en dehors de sa lignée,  comme la famille du clan; mais plus important encore, la famille comprend aussi «d’autres choses  qu’un être humain», telles que la terre et les êtres de la création. Le mieux-être mental n’est pas un concept qui englobe tout. On l’utilise dans ce cadre pour décrire un seul aspect de notre être – notre esprit. Le mieux-être mental est atteint grâce à la pensée rationnelle et intuitive pour aboutir à la compréhension; le résultat étant le sens de et pour la vie. Enfin, le mieux-être physique est atteint à travers le mode de vie autochtone et en vivant sa vie avec plénitude ; le résultat étant le but (Dumont 2015).

Send To Friend Email Print Story

Comments are closed.

NationTalk Partners & Sponsors Learn More