You can use your smart phone to browse stories in the comfort of your hand. Simply browse this site on your smart phone.

    Using an RSS Reader you can access most recent stories and other feeds posted on this network.

    SNetwork Recent Stories

Lake Manitoba and Lake St. Martin Outlet Channels Project – Public Comments Invited

January 23, 2018 — Ottawa — Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency

The Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency (the Agency) must decide whether a federal environmental assessment is required for the proposed Lake Manitoba and Lake St. Martin Outlet Channels Project, located in the Interlake region of Manitoba.

To help inform this decision, the Agency is seeking comments from the public and Indigenous groups on the project and its potential effects on the environment, as described in the summary of the project description.

As a next step, the Agency will post a decision on its website stating whether an environmental assessment is required. If one is required, the public will have three more opportunities to comment on the environmental assessment of the project.

All comments received will be considered public. Written comments in either official language must be submitted by February 12, 2018 to:

Lake Manitoba and Lake St. Martin Outlet Channels Project
Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency
Canada Place
9700 Jasper Avenue, Suite 1145
Edmonton, Alberta T5J 4C3
Telephone: 780-495-2037
Email: CEAA.PNR-RPN.ACEE@ceaa-acee.gc.ca

Associated Links

Contacts

Marissa Harfouche
Communications Advisor
Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency
613-219-2789
Marissa.Harfouche@ceaa-acee.gc.ca

NT5

AFN National Water Symposium and Trade Show– Reminder: Hotel Booking Deadline Tomorrow January 24, 2018!

AFN National Water Symposium and Trade Show –
Reminder: Hotel Booking Deadline
Tomorrow January 24, 2018!

Greetings,

Register for the AFN National Water Symposium and Trade Show and book hotel accommodations at the Fairmont Hotel Vancouver by January 24, 2018, to be eligible for a great prize!  For more information on booking your hotel and registering for the Symposium, please go to the AFN website at www.afn.ca.

Please be advised the room rate as quoted in our registration package is only available at the Fairmont Hotel Vancouver until the end of the day tomorrow, January 24, 2018.

Should you have any questions regarding the Symposium, please contact the Assembly of First Nations at 1.866.869.6789 or email to 2018watersymposium@afn.ca.

Thank you and we look forward to seeing you in Vancouver!


Symposium national sur l’eau et Foire commerciale de l’APN – Rappel : Date limite de réservation d’hôtel demain 24 janvier 2018!

Bonjour,

Inscrivez-vous au Symposium sur l’eau de l’APN et réservez votre chambre d’hôtel à l’hôtel Fairmont Vancouver d’ici le 24 janvier 2018 pour être admissible au tirage d’un superbe prix! Pour plus de renseignements sur la réservation de votre hôtel et l’inscription au Symposium, veuillez consulter le site Web de l’APN à www.afn.ca.

Veuillez noter que le tarif indiqué dans notre trousse d’inscription n’est offert par l’hôtel Fairmont Vancouver que jusqu’en fin de journée demain, 24 janvier 2018.

Si vous avez des questions au sujet du Symposium, veuillez communiquer avec l’Assemblée des Premières Nations au 1.866.869.6789, ou par courriel à 2018watersymposium@afn.ca.

Nous vous remercions et vous donnons rendez-vous à Vancouver!

NT5

Trudeau visits First Nation amid suicide crisis

Credits: The National

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau visited the Pikangikum First Nation, a community struggling with a suicide crisis and many other problems affecting young people and their mental health.

Welcome to The National, the flagship nightly newscast of CBC News

»»» Subscribe to The National to watch more videos here: https://www.youtube.com/user/CBCTheNa…

Voice Your Opinion & Connect With Us Online:

The National Updates on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/thenational
The National Updates on Twitter: https://twitter.com/CBCTheNational

»»» »»» »»» »»» »»»

The National is CBC Television’s flagship news program. Airing six days a week, the show delivers news, feature documentaries and analysis from some of Canada’s leading journalists.

New Geoscience BC data to spark mineral exploration investment in northern BC

Vancouver, BC – January 23, 2018

Geoscience BC revealed new project data at the AME Roundup conference today that will spark investment in mineral exploration and guide land planning in northern BC.

The Search Phase III project data highlights where mineral deposits may be with more accuracy than ever before. This will help the exploration sector, communities, First Nations, and governments to plan future land use and attract investment.

Search Phase III covers a remote 9,600 km2 area of north central and northeastern BC from the proposed Kemess Underground mine south to near Mackenzie. Helicopters equipped with ultra-sensitive magnetometers flew at a constant elevation of 80 metres for more than 40,000 km in the area – the equivalent of flying around the Earth. The data was then collated for release at this week’s AME Roundup conference.

Minister of Energy, Mines and Petroleum Resources Michelle Mungall welcomed the publication of the results. She said: “Globally, the increased demand for technologies like smart phones and electric cars is also increasing the demand for metals and minerals produced in British Columbia. Geoscience BC projects like this are critical to sparking exploration, discovery and ultimately the production of metals such as copper which are used for these items every day.”

Commenting on the release of the results, Geoscience BC Vice President of Minerals and Mining Bruce Madu said: “Search Phase III highlights new potential deposits containing metals like copper in a region that has been home to several mines in the past. It’s an exciting example of how new science can be used to drive investment and stimulate our economy.”

Search Phase III received $250,000 in approved funding support from Northern Development through the Economic Diversification Infrastructure program. The project provides data, which highlights where mineral deposits in the remote 9,600 km2 area of north central and northeastern BC from the proposed Kemess Underground mine south to near Mackenzie.

CEO Joel Mackay said: “The mining sector in British Columbia is gaining as commodity prices recover, creating new potential investment opportunities that will benefit communities across northern B.C. This data is critically important to informing mineral exploration decisions, and helping our region capitalize on global trends. We continue to value our partnership with Geoscience BC and commend them for their work on Search Phase III.”

Now that results are published, Geoscience BC will continue to work with First Nations and other communities in the project area to demonstrate how they can best use the new data. All results – from raw data to a series of summary maps – are available publicly for free.

The Geoscience BC team is available to discuss the data and other projects at AME Roundup Conference booth #324 in the Vancouver Convention Centre West until Thursday January 25th.

Accessing information

To view the reports and maps, visit the Search project page or view the information on Geoscience BC’s Earth Science Viewer online mapping application.

View project page and Earth Science Viewer.

About Search Phase III

  • The data was presented at a talk entitled Sparking discovery and innovation opportunities: new Search Phase III geophysical data release on the Innovation Stage at AME Roundup from 10.45am on January 23, 2018.
  • The $1.7 million project was funded by Geoscience BC and Northern Development Initiative Trust. Core funding for Geoscience BC is provided by the Province of British Columbia.
  • CGG Canada Services Ltd carried out the helicopter survey on behalf of Geoscience BC, with quality assurance from in3D Geoscience Inc.
  • Search Phase III follows on from previous phases of the Search project and Geoscience BC’s Targeting Resources for Exploration and Knowledge (TREK) project. Combined, these projects provide high quality and up-to-date data on potential mineral deposits within 65,100 kmof northern and central British Columbia over the past 4 years. Projects like these are proven to bring new investment to the province.

Support for Search Phase III

The value of data from projects like Search Phase III has been confirmed by exploration sector representatives:

David Moore, President & CEO of Canadian junior mineral exploration company Serengeti Resources (www.serengetiresources.com):

“The Search Phase III data release by Geoscience BC today is just the sort regional data set that is most useful to the mineral exploration industry in the search for new mineral deposits in the province. The scale of this new survey provides plenty of opportunities for future discovery and is exactly the type of activity that organizations like Geoscience BC should be undertaking.”

Edie Thome, President & CEO of the Association for Mineral Exploration (AME) (www.amebc.ca):

“Association for Mineral Exploration (AME) members recognize public geoscience gives BC a competitive advantage. Data from Geoscience BC surveys like Search Phase III are proven to bring investment and lead to discoveries in British Columbia.”

About Geoscience BC

Geoscience BC is an independent, non-profit organization that generates earth science information in collaboration with First Nations, local communities, governments, academia and the resource sector. Our independent earth science enables informed resource management decisions. Geoscience BC gratefully acknowledges the financial support of the Province of British Columbia.

Media information:

Please direct all media enquiries to Richard Truman (truman@geosciencebc.com; 778 929 1662) or Candice Appleby (appleby@geosciencebc.com; 604 662 4147).

Representatives from Geoscience BC and NDIT are available for interview upon request. In addition, representatives from Association for Mineral Exploration and from Serengeti Resources are available to comment on how data from projects like Search Phase III is used. Please contact Geoscience BC to arrange interviews.

A brief overview of the Search series of projects is here: Search Project page

A video of the Search Phase III project is also available. If using content from this video please credit Geoscience BC: Search Phase III video

B-roll and images from the project are available here: B-roll and images

NT5

New Controlled Crosswalk Opens in Yellowknife

YELLOWKNIFE (January 23, 2018) – The Department of Infrastructure is pleased to announce the opening of a new controlled crosswalk at the intersection of the Chateau Nova Hotel and Prince of Wales Northern Heritage Centre in Yellowknife.

This crosswalk – in addition to recently installed lighting and pedestrian pathway – greatly improves visibility and safety for pedestrians and motorists.

Pedestrians are reminded to press the button to activate the crosswalk lights and to always watch for traffic. Drivers should always watch for pedestrians and be prepared to stop.

If you have any questions or concerns, please contact Greg Hanna, Communications Coordinator, at 867-767-9082 ext. 31046 or greg_hanna@gov.nt.ca.

NT5

Canadian patients to benefit from major investment in genomics and precision health research – Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada

Minister Wilson-Raybould highlights $75.9 million for genomics research in British Columbia, bringing new hope for Canadians living with cancer, cystic fibrosis, childhood asthma and other diseases.

VANCOUVERJan. 23, 2018  – health promises to transform the way Canadians receive medical care. In the near future, doctors may be able to precisely diagnose symptoms based on a patient’s unique genetic makeup and offer personalized treatment that improves health outcomes and saves lives. Genomics research combined with data analytics will lead to better prevention, diagnosis and treatment of diseases, improve the health of Canadians, and make our health care system more effective.

To help make all that a reality, the Honourable Jody Wilson-Raybould, Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada, on behalf of the Honourable Kirsty Duncan, Minister of Science, today announced two major genomics research investments in British Columbia during a visit to the BC Children’s Hospital. The total investment of $75.9 million comes from the federal and provincial governments, research institutions and private sector partners.

The Minister of Science made the national announcement today in Toronto, highlighting a $255-million investment in genomics research in Canada. This includes a $162-million investment in 15 genomics and precision health projects across Canada through Genome Canada, the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) and co-funding partners.

Many of the projects focus on paediatric medicine, a globally recognized Canadian research strength. Genomics-based precision health approaches to childhood brain cancer, asthma and arthritis enable earlier diagnoses and provide new opportunities to address root causes of such diseases rather than symptoms. This funding also supports a targeted initiative to address health challenges specific to Indigenous populations, improving diagnostic outcomes for Indigenous children that have genetic diseases and reducing inequities in access to advanced health care between Indigenous and non-Indigenous populations.

The Government of Canada also announced a second major investment to support advanced genomics technology platforms across the country. These technology platforms support the development of improved technologies that underpin research advances in health, agriculture and natural resources. A total of $93 million is being invested in ten platforms nationwide, two of which are in British Columbia. The platforms are receiving $45 million in federal funding through Genome Canada and an additional $48 million from other sources.

These combined investments will provide researchers with access to cutting-edge tools, technologies and services while furthering the Government of Canada’s goal of strengthening and supporting the country’s scientific community.

Quotes

“It is an honour to support some of Canada’s leading genomics and precision health researchers through investments that will allow them to further their discoveries and innovations. Their incredible work brings hope to Canadians living with chronic illnesses, such as cancer, arthritis and cystic fibrosis, while strengthening Canada’s health care system.”
– The Honourable Kirsty Duncan, Minister of Science

“All Canadians stand to benefit from the innovative and collaborative research projects being announced today. The platforms, tools, technologies and services that will be developed through this funding will improve our understanding of many illnesses, particularly those that affect the most vulnerable patients, including children and Indigenous peoples.”
– The Honourable Ginette Petitpas Taylor, Minister of Health

“This investment will support groundbreaking developments in genomics and precision health research and will help address a wide range of health challenges faced by Canadians, including our most vulnerable populations. This funding will also support researchers across the country who are improving the accuracy of diagnostics for Indigenous children and helping enhance equal access to treatment and care. We will continue to invest in Canadian companies that are leading their field and breaking new ground in the science and technology sectors.”
– The Honourable Jody Wilson-Raybould, Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

“What’s exciting about these genomics and precision health projects is how clinically oriented they are. Most are led by clinical scientists who deal with patients on a day-to-day basis and are well positioned to apply the research to health care settings. Further, they are not just about developing new therapies to treat diseases but also about early diagnosis and intervention to better curb or manage diseases at their onset.”
– Marc LePage, President and CEO, Genome Canada

“Our understanding of the human genome and epigenetics is advancing at an unprecedented pace. As a result, today we are creating knowledge that will improve health and health care delivery in ways that were unimaginable only years ago. CIHR is proud to partner with Genome Canada on this important initiative and to support the outstanding scientists who are at the forefront of this rapidly growing field of research.”
– Dr. Roderick R. McInnes, Acting President, Canadian Institutes of Health Research

“These projects exemplify the power of genomics as a tool to enable precise diagnosis and treatment for patients with diverse health challenges. Through consistent investment in genomics technology, coupled with the recruitment and support of B.C.’s top researchers, we have positioned B.C. as a global leader in genomics. As a result, clinicians can provide patients and families with personalized treatment options and preventive strategies that offer better health outcomes through cost-effective care.”
– Dr. Pascal Spothelfer, President and CEO, Genome British Columbia

Quick facts

  • The precision health project teams represent the successful applicants to Genome Canada’s 2017 Large-Scale Applied Research Project Competition: Genomics and Precision Health, a partnership with the Canadian Institutes of Health Research.
  • The investments in genomics technology platforms are the result of Genome Canada’s 2016 Genomics Technology Platforms – Operations Support and Technology Development Funds competition.
  • Research that examines the science from the perspective of social sciences and humanities is a key component of every Large-Scale Applied Research Program project. This essential research element is designed to support the development and application of genomics research that maximizes benefits for patients and minimizes risks.

Associated links

Backgrounder – Precision health projects
Backgrounder – Genomics technology platforms

For further information: Ann Marie Paquet, Press Secretary, Office of the Minister of Science, 613-404-2733, ann-marie.paquet@canada.ca; Andrea Matyas, Director, Communications, Genome Canada, 613-790-0106, amatyas@genomecanada.ca; Kathleen Davis, Communications and Parliamentary Affairs Advisor, Office of the Minister of Justice, 613-992-4621; Media Relations, Canadian Institutes of Health Research, 613-941-4563, mediarelations@cihr-irsc.gc.ca

Related Links

http://www.ic.gc.ca/eic/site/icgc.nsf/eng/home

NT5

First Air announces proposal for growth to Canada’s Arctic

OTTAWA, Jan. 23, 2018 – In partnership with The Ottawa Airport Authority and Aeroterm, First Air submitted two separate applications to the National Trade Corridors Fund (NTCF). This Government of Canada program was announced mid-2017 to provide funding for infrastructure projects that help support the flow of goods and passengers throughout the transportation system by reducing bottlenecks and addressing capacity issues. Ensuring that Canada’s northern communities benefit from these important infrastructure projects was identified as an important priority for the NTCF.

First Air, a wholly Inuit-owned airline, is a vital link in the supply chain to the North; in the past year, First Air shipped an incredible 19.4 million metric tons of cargo freight out of Ottawa to Canada’s Arctic communities, including food, mail, medical supplies and other goods. With cargo demands expected to increase by 28% over the next five years, First Air needs to ensure capacity exists at both ends of the process to support this growth.

The first proposal addresses capacity issues at First Air’s cargo facilities in Ottawa, which are located on the grounds of the Ottawa International Airport, by increasing warehousing and refrigeration capacity and modernizing technology aimed at reducing spoilage and delayed shipments. In keeping with Canada’s focus on transportation security, the expansion would ensure compliance with federal security screening requirements.

In support of the project, the Ottawa Airport Authority proposes to realign Alert Road to facilitate an expansion of First Air’s existing maintenance hangar to the east. Aeroterm, the managing partner of Ottawa’s FedEx shipping operation, would take over First Air’s existing cargo warehouse to expand its facilities.

Brock Friesen, President and CEO of First Air, said “We want to ensure that we not only meet the growing cargo demand of Canada’s Arctic and that we also continue to provide the best service possible in doing so. The Arctic communities depend on us on a daily basis, every day of the year. We take this role very seriously and are committed to modernizing our facilities to optimize service to the North.”

“As a key gateway into Canada’s Arctic, the Ottawa International Airport Authority is acutely aware of the importance of First Air’s ability to meet the growing demand for the movement of people and goods to the North” said Mark Laroche, President and CEO of the Ottawa International Airport Authority. “This application not only meets the spirit of the National Transportation Corridors Fund, it will make a meaningful difference to communities and individuals inCanada’s North who will benefit from increased availability and lower prices for goods, and we look forward to the federal government’s favourable consideration”.

The application, which requests half of the $17.5 million dollar project, could commence as early as 2018 with the realignment of Alert Road and would continue through to 2020/2021 with construction of the new cargo facilities.

The second and separate proposal pertains to an expansion project for First Air’s Iqaluit Cargo facilities. As the Eastern Arctic hub, the expansion would facilitate the distribution of goods to more than 11 smaller Nunavut communities. The expansion would include construction of a larger warehouse to aid in ensuring the uninterrupted delivery of critical freight. This new facility would also include enhanced inventory management and delivery standards through increased refrigeration capacity and new radio frequency identification (RFID), as well as the integration of Green technology into the design of the structures to maximize energy conservation.

First Air is the largest freight service provider to Arctic communities; the project in Iqaluit is proposed at a cost of $17 million dollars and is looking for a start date in 2018 if funding approvals are obtained.

About First Air

With over 70 years of flying experience, First Air is the leading airline in Canada’s Arctic, providing scheduled service to Northern Communities with connections to OttawaMontrealWinnipeg and Edmonton.

First Air is 100% owned by Makivik Corporation, representing the Inuit beneficiaries of the James Bay and Northern Quebec Agreement.

About the Ottawa International Airport Authority

OMCIAA manages, operates and develops airport facilities and lands in support of the economic growth of Canada’sCapital Region, generating more than $2.2 billion annually in total economic activity in Ottawa and Gatineau.

For further information: MEDIA CONTACTS: First Air, Dan Valin, Manager, Marketing and Communications, dvalin@firstair.ca, 613-254-6294, www.firstair.ca; Ottawa International Airport Authority, Krista Kealey, Vice-President, Communications and Public Affairs, Krista.Kealey@YOW.ca, 613-248-2050, www.yow.ca

Related Links

https://www.yow.ca
www.firstair.ca

NT4

Reminder: Water advisory for Sanikiluaq

January 23, 2018

The Department of Health reminds residents of Sanikiluaq that water for consumption must come from the reverse osmosis units that have been installed in each household.

It is essential to use water from the reverse osmosis units for the following uses:

  • drinking
  • preparing infant formulas
  • preparing juices and ice cubes
  • washing fruits and vegetables
  • cooking
  • brushing of teeth

Store-bought water is also safe to drink.

###

Media Contact:

Ron Wassink
Communications Specialist
Department of Health
867-975-5710
rwassink@gov.nu.ca

NT5

PBO and Finance Canada Long-term Projection Comparison

January 23, 2018

Get the report
PBO and Finance Canada Long-term Projection Comparison.pdf
Summary
This report provides a comparison of long-term economic and fiscal projections prepared by Finance Canada and PBO in 2017.

  • PBO’s projection of real GDP growth is slightly lower than Finance Canada over 2017-2022 and 2023-2035. Over the period 2036-2055, the difference between the projections widens to 0.2 percentage points annually (1.6 per cent versus 1.8 per cent), on average.
  • Both PBO and Finance Canada project the federal budgetary balance (relative to the size of the economy) to increase over the long term.
  • Relative to the size of the economy, PBO and Finance Canada project federal government debt to decline over the long term.
  • Based on PBO and Finance Canada projections, we estimate that over 2017 to 2055 the federal government could increase spending or reduce taxes by 0.6-0.7 per cent of GDP (roughly $13 billion in current dollars) annually while maintaining fiscal sustainability.

NT4

The Latest: Trudeau backs gender balance on boards – CP

Source: The Associated Press
Jan 23, 2018 13:49

DAVOS, Switzerland _ The Latest on the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland (all times local):

7:45 p.m.

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau says corporate leaders should consider gender-balanced boards.

Trudeau made woman’s rights and gender equality a focus of his speech at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland. The prime minister named women to half the positions in his cabinet in 2015 and his succinct “Because it’s 2015” explanation for the move attracted international attention.

Trudeau says the #MeToo movement shows the need to have a critical discussion on women’s rights, equality, and the power. The movement has been credited with unveiling widespread sexual abuse and misconduct.

He says gender equality will be a focus of the G-7 Summit in Canada later this year.

___

6:50 p.m.

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau says his government is working to convince the U.S. of the benefits of the North American Free Trade Agreement.

The government of U.S. President Donald Trump is in talks to revise NAFTA and threatened to withdraw from it, saying it puts the U.S. at a disadvantage.

Trudeau told the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland: “We’re working very hard to make sure that our neighbour to the south recognizes how good NAFTA is and that it’s benefited not just our economy but his economy and the world’s economy.”

He added that Canada is open also to trade deals involving more countries.

Seventy-five per cent of Canada’s trade goes to the U.S.

___

6:00 p.m.

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau says Canada and 10 other countries of the Trans-Pacific Partnership have agreed to a revised trade agreement.

The deal comes exactly one year after U.S. President Donald Trump withdrew his country from the agreement.

The agreement follows two days of high-level talks in Tokyo and was confirmed by Canadian International Trade Minister Francois-Philippe Champagne. The partners are now expected to work toward signing the agreement by early March.

Trudeau told a crowd at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, that the pact meets Canada’s objectives of creating and sustaining growth, prosperity and well-paying middle-class jobs today and for generations to come.

The agreement comes amid worries that Trump will pull the U.S. out of the North American Free Trade deal. Seventy-five per cent of Canada’s trade goes to the U.S.

___

5:10 p.m.

First lady Melania Trump will not accompany U.S. President Donald Trump to a global summit in Davos this week.

Spokeswoman Stephanie Grisham said Tuesday that due to “scheduling and logistical issues,” Mrs. Trump will not attend.

The White House had previously said she would accompany the president on the trip to the annual summit in a Swiss Alpine resort.

A government shutdown had threated to upend the trip, but it is back on with the government reopening.

A Cabinet delegation was expected to leave Tuesday and the president later in the week. The president is set to address the gathering Friday.

___

5:00 p.m.

The World Economic Forum can be a fairly sober event. But on the sidelines it’s packed with interactive exhibits showcasing a particular trend or problem.

One exhibit this year is a 12-minute excerpt of a virtual reality production, Zero Days VR, produced by studio Scatter and based on a 2016 Alex Gibney documentary, Zero Days.

It’s about cyberwarfare, specifically about a computer virus called Stuxnet suspected to have been made by the U.S. and Israel to destroy Iranian centrifuges. Delegates are taken on a ride showing the discovery of the virus, how it works and moves through a computer network and ultimately how it affects the centrifuges.

Director Yasmin Elayat says the WEF found out about the VR film last year from the Sundance Film Festival, where it premiered, and think the film can highlight the stakes in cybersecurity in “an innovative way.”

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has walked past a couple of occasions. Elayat said she would really “love for him to come see it.”

___

3:30 p.m.

While some Davos notables had words of praise about Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s speech, Christine Lagarde was more curt: “I would have loved to hear a bit more about girls.”

The harrumphing quip from the IMF managing director testified to sensitivity on gender inequality that World Economic Forum organizers have been trying to address: Lagarde is one of seven on a new all-woman cast of co-chairs of the Davos meeting this year.

This year’s Davos forum has the event’s highest-ever proportion of women participants, though they still only make up a bit more than one in five attendees.

Another of those co-chairs, Norwegian Prime Minister Erna Solberg, praised Modi for criticizing protectionism and calling for respect of the rule of law.

And former U.S. Vice-President Al Gore gushed: “Prime Minister Modi made climate change the No. 1 priority. On that, I thought he did extremely well.”

___

2:25 p.m.

A leading British investment manager says that a catastrophic IT crash that puts markets out of action for several days could be the catalyst to another financial crisis.

Anna Richards, chief executive of London-based M&G Investments, says the next financial crisis is unlikely to emerge from a geopolitical event, as markets are used to dealing with such events on a regular basis.

More worrying for Richards are the technological innovations that have fundamentally altered the way markets operate and that investors are “somewhat blind to.”

She told the World Economic Forum: “We all have businesses which are absolutely reliant on a very small number of people who provide the pipes that effectively we all put our business though.”

How markets react if no one could trade for “one, two or three days” would be “kind of interesting,” she added.

___

1:50 p.m.

Prime Minister Narendra Modi says India’s economy would more than double and touch $5 trillion by 2025.

Modi made the comments in his keynote speech at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland.

Speaking in Hindi, Modi added that when an Indian prime minister was in Davos last in 1997 India’s GDP was a “little more than $400 billion and now two decades later it’s about six times that amount.”

He said that his government was committed to boosting economic growth and reducing bureaucratic hurdles to doing business in India. He said his government was committed to making the economy attractive for investment.

___

1:00 p.m.

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi says his government is committed to working to save the environment and alleviating the impact of climate change.

Modi said Tuesday that his government had set itself the ambitious target of producing 175 GW of renewable energy by 2022. In the past three years India has been able to produce about 60GW of renewable energy.

He made the comments as he delivered the keynote address to the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland.

Modi added that the developed world needed to do more to help poorer nations combat the effects of climate change.

Modi said that while everyone talked about reducing carbon emissions, very few developed countries backed that up by helping developing nations like India with resources to adopt appropriate new technologies to that end.

___

12:10 p.m.

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi says the recent wave of trade protectionism, in which governments raise barriers to free trade between nations, is “worrisome.”

Modi delivered the warning in a speech Tuesday just hours after the U.S. government of President Donald Trump approved tariffs on imported solar-energy components and large washing machines in a bid to help U.S. manufacturers.

In a keynote address to the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, Modi said that “forces of protectionism are raising their heads against globalization.” Without directly mentioning Trump or the U.S., he said “the solution to this worrisome situation against globalization is not isolation.”

He quoted Mohandas Gandhi: “I don’t want the windows of my house to be closed from all directions. I want the winds of cultures of all countries to enter my house with aplomb and go out also.”

___

11:35 a.m.

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi is drawing a crowd in Davos.

IMF Managing Director Christine Lagarde, Presidents Paul Kagame of Rwanda and Emmerson Mnangagwa of Zimbabwe, and former U.S. Vice-President Al Gore have poured into a Davos ballroom to hear the Indian leader’s keynote speech for the World Economic Forum this year.

Swiss President Alain Berset set up the stage for Modi, appealing to the hundreds of people in the crowd: “Let us make 2018 a year in which we overcome the phase of hand-wringing and self-criticism, in which each of us works to promote social inclusion.”

___

11:15 a.m.

An expert on global financial crises is downplaying fears that the world is set for another downturn.

A decade on from the last crash, Professor Kenneth Rogoff from Harvard University says there is “no plan A” to deal with another crisis given that interest rates remain at super-low levels and public finances remain stretched.

However, Rogoff told an audience at the World Economic Forum that financial crises have a “long afterlife” and that “we’re actually at the tail-end of the last one.”

Fears have risen recently that the global economy may be heading for another downturn, with many worried about the scale of gains in global stock markets and even the huge volatility in trading of virtual currencies like Bitcoin.

Still, he said China is the country that’s exhibiting many of the characteristics of a “typical financial crisis building up.”

___

10:35 a.m.

A German business leader is warning U.S. President Donald Trump that his decision to slap tariffs on imported solar panels and washing machines will backfire.

On Monday, Trump approved the tariffs in a bid to help domestic manufacturers.

However, Frank Appel, CEO of Deutsche Post DHL, told an audience at the World Economic Forum Tuesday that the move will hurt exactly those who Trump is ostensibly trying to help.

He said: “Even if the U.S. does more protectionism, consumers will buy from different places and who pays the bill? All the employees in the U.S. finally.”

Tidjane Thiam, the CEO of Swiss bank Credit Suisse, said he remains bullish on global trade despite the tariffs decision.

He said: “We will need to see how it impacts global trade, how other trading blocs react to that, but I remain optimistic. I think we are in exceptionally favourable context.”

___

9:55 a.m.

Stock markets around the world are flying high amid a synchronized global upturn but a leading U.S. investor is warning of a potential “reckoning.”

Stephen Schwarzman, chairman and CEO of Blackstone, told an audience at the World Economic Forum that the markets have responded to a positive global economic growth story. It is, he said, a time of “enormous ebullience.”

However, he said there are “lurking” geopolitical risks out there that could put the knock markets off track and there will come a time when some of these problems are “not contained.”

U.S. stock markets have been in particularly strong, with the Dow Jones industrial average hitting a run of record highs on the back of confidence around the U.S. economy and President Donald Trump’s big tax reform package.

___

6:00 a.m.

The World Economic Forum officially gets underway Tuesday with Indian leader Narendra Modi delivering the keynote speech.

Modi was meant to be the event’s highlight until President Donald Trump decided to come as well. Trump is due to speak Friday, though the U.S. government shutdown has put his presence in doubt.

There will be much interest in Modi, who follows on from Chinese President Xi Jinping’s address to the global elite at last year’s event. Xi portrayed his country as a champion of free trade on the same week Trump was inaugurated president.

Modi will likely tout India’s economic successes and stress that his country is also open for business.

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is later due to address the Davos crowd, which is gathering in unusually heavy snowfall.

INDEX: INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS

Minister LeBlanc announces new protections for whales

New management measures in place for 2018 season

Moncton, New Brunswick – Canadians care deeply about our oceans and the marine mammals that they’re home to. For endangered North Atlantic Right Whales, time is of the essence to find solutions that will help ensure the survival of the species.

Today, the Honourable Dominic LeBlanc, Minister of Fisheries, Oceans and the Canadian Coast Guard, announced new fishery management measures for gear configuration for the Southern Gulf of St. Lawrence snow crab fishery that will reduce risks to these whales and help ensure their survival.

These new fishery measures take into account feedback that was shared at the Ministerial Roundtable on North Atlantic Right Whales hosted by Minister LeBlanc in Moncton, New Brunswick on November 9, 2017. The meeting included representatives of the fishing and marine transportation industries, non-governmental partners, Indigenous community members and scientists. Participants provided a wide array of perspectives and valuable information that added to a more thorough understanding of the situation.

The changes for the Southern Gulf of St. Lawrence snow crab fishery include:

  • Reducing the amount of rope floating on the surface of the water.
    • A maximum of 3.7 metres – or two fathoms – of rope can be used when attaching a secondary buoy to a primary buoy.
    • No rope attaching a crab trap to a primary buoy can remain floating on the surface of the water after the crab trap has been set.
  • Marking rope with a colour specific to each fishing area
    • Licence holders are required to mark rope that is used to attach a crab trap to a primary buoy with a color specific to the fishing area in which they are authorized to fish.
  • Identifying buoys with a sequential number (This is in addition to the current requirement to mark buoys with the vessel registration number.)
    • Licence holders are required to identify each primary buoy with a sequential number so individual crab trap can be identified.
  • Mandatory reporting of all lost gear
    • Beginning in 2018 all licence holders are now required to report lost gear.

These management measures will contribute to reducing gear entanglements, tracking lost gear, and better understanding the interactions between whales and fishing gear.  Other suggestions included: modifying fishing gear, adjusting fishing seasons, recovering gear from the ocean floor, and better collaborating with partners.

Additional management measures and actions to protect whales are being considered and will be announced in the near future.

What We Heard report, which provides an overview of the key ideas discussed at the meeting, is now available. 

Quotes

“Protecting Canada’s endangered whales from further harm is a responsibility that weighs heavily on all of us. Our government is committed to taking meaningful action to address the threats to whales in a way that is also mindful of our partners. The new fishery measures announced today will help prevent gear entanglements in the future. Our government will continue to work to protect our waters and marine life for generations to come.”

The Honourable Dominic LeBlanc, P.C., Q.C., M.P., Minister of Fisheries, Oceans and the Canadian Coast Guard

Quick Facts

  • The roundtable meeting brought together over 70 participants and observers attending on behalf of all levels of government, Indigenous communities, industry, academia, the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and environmental organizations.

Contacts

Media Relations
Fisheries and Oceans Canada
613-990-7537
Media.xncr@dfo-mpo.gc.ca

Laura Gareau
Press Secretary
Office of the Minister
Fisheries and Oceans Canada
613-992-3474
Laura.Gareau@dfo-mpo.gc.ca

NT5

Canadian patients to benefit from major investment in genomics and precision health research

Tuesday, January 23, 2018

Toronto, ON

Government of Canada and partners invest $255 million in genomics research bringing new hope for Canadians living with cancer, cystic fibrosis, juvenile arthritis, childhood asthma and other diseases.

Precision health promises to transform the way Canadians receive medical care. In the near future, doctors may be able to precisely diagnose symptoms based on a patient’s unique genetic makeup and offer them tailor-made treatments that can save the patient’s life.

To help make that possibility a reality, the Government of Canada announced two new major investments in genomics research totalling $255 million from federal and provincial governments, as well as research institutions and private sector partners.

The federal Minister of Science, the Honourable Kirsty Duncan, made the announcements at The Hospital for Sick Children (SickKids) in Toronto, where she highlighted a $162 million investment through Genome Canada, the Canadian Institutes of Health Research and co-funding partners, in 15 genomics and precision health projects across Canada.

The projects funded at SickKids will provide targeted treatments for children with brain cancer and will transform treatment for children living with arthritis. The funding also supports a targeted initiative to address health challenges facing Indigenous populations, improving diagnostic outcomes for Indigenous children that have genetic diseases.

Minister Duncan also announced a second major investment to support advanced genomics technology platforms across the country. These technology platforms support the development of improved technologies that underpin research advances in health, agriculture and natural resources. A total of $93 million is being invested in 10 platforms nationwide, with $45 million in federal funding through Genome Canada and an additional $48 million from other sources.

The combined totals of these two investments will provide researchers with access to cutting-edge tools, technologies and services while furthering the Government of Canada’s goal to strengthen and support the country’s scientific community.

Quotes

“It is an honour to support some of Canada’s leading genomics and precision health researchers through investments that will allow them to further their discoveries and innovations. Their incredible work brings hope to Canadians living with chronic illnesses, such as cancer, cystic fibrosis and arthritis, while strengthening Canada’s health-care system.”

– Honourable Kirsty Duncan, Minister of Science

“All Canadians stand to benefit from the innovative and collaborative research projects being announced today. The platforms, tools, technologies and services that will be developed through this funding will improve our understanding of many illnesses, particularly those that affect the most vulnerable patients, including children and Indigenous peoples.”

– Honourable Ginette Petitpas Taylor, Minister of Health

“What’s exciting about these genomics and precision health projects is how clinically-oriented they are. Most are led by clinical scientists who deal with patients on a day-to-day basis and are well positioned to apply the research to health-care settings. Further, they are not just about developing new therapies to treat diseases, but about early diagnosis and intervention to better curb or manage diseases at their onset.”

– Mr. Marc LePage, President and CEO, Genome Canada

“Our understanding of the human genome and epigenetics is advancing at an unprecedented pace.  As a result, today we are creating knowledge that will improve health and health care delivery in ways that were unimaginable only years ago. CIHR is proud to partner with Genome Canada on this important initiative, and to support the outstanding scientists who are at the forefront of this rapidly growing field of research.”

– Dr. Roderick R. McInnes, Acting President, Canadian Institutes of Health Research

Quick facts

Associated links

NT5

RCMP Update – Judith Robinson safely located

January 23, 2018

Thompson, Manitoba

On January 9, 2018, at 4:05 pm, the Thompson RCMP received a report of a missing teen from the community. Judith Robinson, 15-years of age, was last seen on January 6 in Winnipeg and was scheduled to return home to Thompson by bus on January 9, but did not return.

Robinson is described as Indigenous, 5’4″, 122 pounds, brown eyes and long brown hair.

The RCMP are concerned for the well-being of Robinson and are asking anyone with information to call the Thompson RCMP at 204-677-6911.

-30-

Contact information

Contact:
Sgt. Paul Manaigre, Media Relations Officer
RCMP Media Relations
204-983-8497
paul.manaigre@rcmp-grc.gc.ca

NT5

Feds’ First Nations drinkable water pledge just got harder – CTV News

January 23, 2018

OTTAWA – The federal government’s pledge to eradicate all drinking water advisories in First Nations communities by March 2021 has just become a bigger task, as the number of water systems with long-term drinking water advisories has increased.

As of Tuesday, there are 91 systems that have long-term drinking water advisories, up from 67 at the end of 2017. The number of communities still turning to alternative water sources for drinking, bathing and cooking has increased because the department has recently responsibility for more systems, including 24 that already had long-term advisories.

These drinking water warnings have been in place for over a year.

Read More: https://www.ctvnews.ca/politics/feds-first-nations-drinkable-water-pledge-just-got-harder-1.3771841

Art Gallery of Windsor launches Indigenous art program – Windsorite.ca

January 23, 2018

The Art Gallery of Windsor has launched a new First Nations, Métis, and Inuit art curriculum-linked program initiative serving Grades 4 to 8 students through the visual arts.

“The Art Gallery of Windsor has been introducing Windsor students to the visual arts for years, and for that we are very fortunate,” said Lisa Gretzky, MPP for Windsor West. “Now, with this wonderful new program, made possible through a grant from the Ontario Trillium Foundation, our students will be exposed to arts from the perspective of the indigenous peoples of Canada,” she added. “This will bring an essential and much-needed dimension to their education.”

In addition to the launch of the program, the gallery is planning a re-installation of its Look Again! AGW collection installation, which will include recent acquisitions of Indigenous art to support the educational experience.

Read More: http://windsorite.ca/2018/01/art-gallery-of-windsor-launches-indigenous-art-program/

Whitecap Dakota First Nation, Canada make steps towards Reconciliation

The Government of Canada and the Whitecap Dakota First Nation took another step towards Reconciliation today, with the signing of the historic Framework Agreement for a Whitecap Dakota Treaty.

“Today’s Framework Agreement commits us to collaborate on the next step: a Canada-Whitecap Dakota Treaty that fully reconciles our relationship with the Crown and Government through honourable and practical arrangements,” said Darcy Bear, Chief of the Whitecap Dakota First Nation.

He added that the historical military and trade alliances with the British Crown dating back to the 1700s helped to create Canada.

Whitecap, which sits just south of Saskatoon, is not currently part of any Treaty. In the 1870s, Dakota Chief Whitecap was present at both Treaty 4 and Treaty 6 discussions, but was not invited to be a signatory to those Treaties.

“The Government is honoured to be signing this historic Agreement, setting the stage for a Whitecap Dakota Treaty and a true nation-to-nation relationship,” said Carolyn Bennett, minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs.

“Together we are charting a path forward that supports their vision of greater self-determination and a sustainable, self-reliant community.”

NT5

Outcomes of Pauktuutit Inuit Women of Canada’s Annual General Meeting

JANUARY 22, 2018

OTTAWA – Pauktuutit Inuit Women of Canada’s Board of Directors and delegates concluded the 2018 Annual General Meeting (AGM) on Saturday, January 20th. The AGM was attended by Pauktuutit’s Board of Directors, delegates, special guests and members of the public. Agenda items included special appearances from the Honourable Minister Carolyn Bennett and President Natan Obed, board member elections, selection of the Woman of the Year award recipient, and a public consultation on Inuit women’s perspectives on the creation of an Arctic Policy Framework.

Pauktuutit was joined by the Honourable Minister Carolyn Bennett for a joint announcement regarding Pauktuutit’s core funding. The Minister for Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs and President Kudloo announced an additional $1 million to support the important work Pauktuutit does to represent Inuit women and girls across the country. This funding, in addition to our current annual funding, will help increase Pauktuutit’s capacity to implement initiatives that directly address the safety and well-being of Inuit women and children, as well as focus on new and emerging issues including youth issues and women’s leadership.

Kudloo had the following statement, “This new funding demonstrates the confidence that Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada has in Pauktuutit and our accomplishments for Inuit women over the past 30 years. We are excited to build on our existing work and continue to advocate for all Inuit women in Canada.”

Pauktuutit was happy to welcome President Natan Obed to officially sign a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between Pauktuutit Inuit Women of Canada and Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami (ITK). We hope this MOU will strengthen the working relationship between Pauktuutit and ITK by respecting and supporting both of our organization’s mandates. We are eager to continue to work with ITK to uplift each other and all Inuit in Canada.

Elections were held for numerous board member positions at this year’s AGM. We extend a warm welcome and congratulations to our new and returning board members. The following are the board member seats that were up for election and the accompanying results:

  • Western Arctic – Anita Pokiak
  • Nunavik Ungava – Pasha Arngaq
  • Nunavik Hudson – Leena Metuq
  • Youth – Alyssa Carpenter
  • Urban – Billie-Jo Barnes
  • Urban – Martha Flaherty
  • South Baffin Region – Geela Maniapik
  • Iqaluit – Parniga Akeeagok

Pauktuutit’s Woman of the Year award has been awarded to Marlene Kunilusie! We congratulate Marlene and encourage her to continue to be a leader in her community and support Inuit women and girls. A gift will be sent to Marlene to commemorate this special achievement.

In addition to our usual agenda items, Pauktuutit held a consultation session with Inuit women on the creation of Canada’s Arctic Policy Framework. We are pleased that Inuit women from every region of Inuit Nunangat and from urban centers could participate and contribute to the development of an Inuit women’s perspective of the Framework. We look forward to sharing the report with our participants, government and the public.

Pauktuutit’s board members, delegates and members of the public were also treated to special performances by the students of Nunavut Sivuniksavut and Twin Flames.

Kudloo reflected on the week’s meetings, “It’s always a pleasure to hear from and work with Inuit women. I am grateful to all the Inuit women who came together this week to share their input on Pauktuutit’s priorities and advocacy. I thank everyone who took the time to join us, particularly the delegates who flew from every corner of Canada to be here.”

We thank all of our board members, delegates and guests for joining us for our 2018 AGM.

-30-

For media inquiries, please contact Amanda Deseure at adeseure@pauktuutit.ca or by phone by 613-238-3977 ext 239.

NT5

Release of report on Name-Blind Recruitment Pilot Project in the federal public service

January 23, 2018 – Gatineau, Quebec – Public Service Commission of Canada

Today, the President of the Public Service Commission of Canada (PSC), Patrick Borbey, released the findings of the Name-Blind Recruitment Pilot Project.

The results indicate that removing identifying candidate information from job applications had no effect on the screening decisions of managers with respect to applications from members of visible minority groups. Additionally, it showed that removing identifying information from applications significantly reduced the overall number of non visible minority candidates who were screened into job processes.

The objective of the pilot project, which was launched in April 2017, was to determine whether concealing personal information regarding a candidate’s origin from their job application had an impact on the screening decisions made by reviewers when compared to the traditional assessment method.

To complement the findings of the Name-Blind Recruitment Pilot Project, the PSC will undertake audit work, beginning in May 2018, to explore the success rates of applicants at key stages of the appointment process.  It will also explore how name-blind principles could be included in the design of any future technology changes to our recruitment systems, should the need arise.  The PSC will also share its methodology with departments and agencies who may decide to use name-blinding in their staffing processes.

Quotes

“The release of today’s report is just one of the many ways the PSC is exploring innovative approaches to ensure a diverse and representative workforce while supporting bias-free recruitment within the federal public service. We will continue to push boundaries in this area while maintaining the integrity of the federal public service’s non-partisan and merit-based staffing system.”

– Patrick Borbey, President of the Public Service Commission of Canada (PSC)

Quick Facts

  • Within the federal public service, all four Employment Equity groups (Women, Members of Visible Minorities, Persons with Disabilities and Aboriginal Peoples) exceed workforce availability. This level of participation has occurred for the fourth year in a row.
  • Removal of identifying information from job applications had no effect on the screening decisions of applications from members of visible minority groups.
  • The pilot examined results from 27 external job processes across 17 participating organizations.  It involved over 2,200 candidates, of which 685 self-declared as visible minorities. 
  • The analysis of the final results included reviews by 3 independent reviewers: Philip Oreopoulos from the University of Toronto, Victor M. Catano from St. Mary’s University and Jean Dumais, from Statistics Canada.

Related Products

Associated Links

Contacts

Media Relations
Public Service Commission
Phone: 819-420-6645
E-mail: CFP.Media.PSC@cfp-psc.gc.ca

NT4

MNBC: Ta Saantii Health & Culture Days Survey

January 22nd, 2018

BC Healthy Living Alliance Funding was secured for several Métis Chartered Communities across the Province to host a total of 18 Métis “Health & Culture” Days, between January and August 2018. These community-designed “Health & Culture” Days will provide an opportunity for Métis community members to get active while reconnecting with Métis culture, their community and the land.

Métis-specific physical activity programs are critical to identifying and addressing Métis health-related needs. As it stands now, Métis health information is primarily based on an assumption that Métis health is equal to that of the First Nations population which results in the delivery of “Aboriginal” or “Indigenous” Health Programs that do not reflect or address the needs of the Métis communities. Alongside the “Health & Culture” Days programming that is underway, we have also put together a brief 5-minute survey to better understand what YOU would like to see in terms of Métis-specific physical activity programs and if there are any barriers to YOUR participation in the existing physical activity programs. This information will allow our team to advise our project partners on best practices for including Métis people in all future physical activity programs.

Please complete the survey to ensure that all “Aboriginal” or “Indigenous” physical activity programs are Métis-inclusive. And, if you are interested in participating in one of the “Health & Culture” Days, stay tuned! We have 3 Métis “Community Activators” – one in the Fraser Health Authority Region, one in the Vancouver Coastal Health Authority Region, and one in Interior Health Authority Region – who are working on behalf of those communities involved in the projects to coordinate and confirm their events!

Thank you for taking the time to fill out the survey and ultimately help create more powerful events.

The link to the survey is as follows:
https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/37ZFNNL

Download Poster.png

Download Poster.jpg

NT5

Department of Indigenous Services Canada provides update on commitment to end long-term drinking water advisories on public systems on reserve

Government adding close to 250 drinking water systems to clean drinking water commitment; 91 long-term advisories to be lifted by March 2021

January, 23, 2018     Ottawa, ON        Department of Indigenous Services Canada

Everyone in Canada deserves access to safe, clean, and reliable drinking water. Our Government is steadfast in our commitment and we remain on track to ending all long-term drinking water advisories on public systems on reserve by March 2021.

Today, the Honourable Jane Philpott, Minister of Indigenous Services, announced that the Department of Indigenous Services Canada will add close to 250 drinking water systems to the total number covered by the federal government’s commitment to ensure clean drinking water on public systems on reserve. As a result, the Government will provide financial support to end 24 additional long-term drinking water advisories by March 2021. This brings the total number of long-term drinking water advisories that remain on public systems on reserve to 91 as of January 23, 2018.

The Government is ready to provide support if any additional drinking water advisories become long term or are at risk of becoming long term, on the more than 1,000 public drinking water systems on reserve covered by its commitment.

Budget 2016 provided investments of $1.8 billion over five years to significantly improve on-reserve water and wastewater infrastructure, ensure proper facility operation, maintenance, and support training of water system operations.

Five-year targeted investments provide communities with the necessary funding security in order to plan, design, and implement required upgrades. Budget 2016 also includes $141.7 million over five years in new funding to improve drinking water monitoring and testing on reserve.

Quotes

“First Nation communities working in partnership with the federal government have started or completed almost 350 projects to improve water and wastewater infrastructure on reserve. As we move into 2018, many of these projects will be completed, and we expect at least 20 additional long-term drinking water advisories will be lifted by the end of the year. We have a lot of hard work ahead, but our Government remains steadfast in our commitment – to lift all long-term drinking water advisories on public systems on reserve by March 2021.”

The Honourable Jane Philpott, M.D., P.C., M.P.
Minister of Indigenous Services

Related Products

Associated Links

Contacts

Andrew MacKendrick
Office of the Honourable Jane Philpott
819-956-5372

Media Relations
Department of Indigenous Affairs Canada
819-953-1160

NT5

OAHS Awarded Indigenous Business of the Year

The Chamber of Commerce Outstanding Business Achievement Awards were held Saturday night in Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario near Whitefish Island. The gala evening event started with an opening address from Acting President Don Mitchell whose remarks had a significant Indigenous focus, which continued throughout the evening. He acknowledged the traditional territory of the Ojibwe people where Sault Ste. Marie is located today and acknowledged the location’s traditional name Bawhating or ‘place of the rapids.’ He also spoke of the Robinson-Huron pre-Confederation Treaty signed in 1850.

Ontario Aboriginal Housing Services (OAHS) was the first recipient of the Indigenous Business of the Year. This award recognizes a business which is operating, or being managed, with a minimum of 51% ownership by an Indigenous person or group. To be considered, the business has distinguished itself by fostering growth, innovation, marketing strategy and consumer excellence, while showing leadership and dedication to the preservation of culture, values and identity.

Acting Executive Director Justin Marchand accepted the award on behalf of OAHS, “Thank you to our awesome staff across the Province and right here in Sault Ste. Marie and to our Board of Directors.” Sandra McBain, widow of the late Don McBain who was the founding Executive Director of OAHS, joined OAHS staff on stage in accepting the award. Justin commented, “Don dedicated his life to our organization but tonight we would like to give an extra
special thank you to Sandra for supporting Don and recognizing the long hours and the travel and the impact to her family. Tonight, we dedicate this award to Sandra.”

Sought-after by stakeholders for his peacemaking approach to consultation and reconciliation, Darrell Boissoneau, former Chief of Garden River First Nation, was the recipient of this year’s President’s Award. Initiated in 1982, the President’s Award recognizes someone who makes an exceptional effort, going above and beyond the call of duty, and in making a unique contribution in any area of business and community development. The recipient of this award is chosen by the Chamber’s Immediate Past President, who for this year, was Paul Johnson. Mr. Johnson remarked, “I was immediately struck by his passion, his openness, and his willingness to travel the path of understanding in relationship building.”

“The spirit of reconciliation and the history of this site is important,” said Chief Boissoneau. He discussed how we are moving forward together in reconciliation and discussed how stereotypes are being broken and noted Ontario Aboriginal Housing Services as an “example of the work our people are doing”. Don Mitchell later added, “with people like Darrell the fight is over, it’s time to work together.”

Media Contact

Angie Kilby
Office Administration/Communications
Telephone: 705-256-1876
Email: angiek@oahssc.ca

Please visit us at www.OntarioAboriginalHousing.ca
Miigwetch!

NT5

Philpott New Department – CP

Source: The Canadian Press – Broadcast wire
Jan 23, 2018 11:02

OTTAWA – Federal briefing documents on the new Indigenous Services Department say Indigenous people in Canada don’t live as long, are more likely to end up in the child welfare system and are less likely to graduate high school.

Indigenous Services Minister Jane Philpott is laying out today the structure and goals of the new department, which is supposed to improve the quality of life and help move away from the top-down approach where Ottawa dictates all that happens in the file.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau announced in August he was splitting the Indigenous Affairs department in two with Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs handling land claims and self-governance and Philpott’s new department taking over government programs on health, child welfare, education and infrastructure.

Philpott’s briefing documents show the difficult job ahead for her new department, with life expectancy for Indigenous people 15 years shorter than other Canadians, infant mortality rates two to three times higher and incidence of diseases such as diabetes four times the rate in non-Indigenous populations.

High school graduation rates on reserve are half of what they are elsewhere, and reserves also have a $30 billion infrastructure deficit for everything from dilapidated, overcrowded housing to water treatment and delivery, roads and broadband services.

Later this week, Philpott is hosting an emergency meeting on child welfare on reserves, which she says is the most pressing issue for her new department.

(The Canadian Press)

INDEX: NATIONAL POLITICS

MNO Grand River Métis Council honours Métis veteran – MNO

January 23, 2018

Submitted by: MNO Grand River Métis Council Councilor Diane Kilby

On November 4, 2017, the Métis Nation of Ontario (MNO) Grand River Métis Council (GRMC) held a special celebration to honour Bernard Pépin, a community hero.

MNO citizen and veteran Pépin served two extended terms with the Canadian military totaling twenty-six years of service. He is also a skilled and award-winning sharpshooter who competes at provincial and national levels.

The MNO GRMC decided that a community celebration was the best way to fete this community hero so they arranged to present him with his Louis Riel medal and certificate that recognize his outstanding military service to Canada during the celebration. Pépin attended with his wife Ella. MNO GRMC President Jennifer Parkinson pinned the Louis Riel medal on Pépin and presented him with his certificate. MNO GRMC Senator Carol Lévis gifted Pépin with a Region 9 sash on behalf of MNO GRMC

Read More: http://www.metisnation.org/news-media/news/bernard-pepin/

Government of Canada makes progress on support for Indigenous Communities

January 23, 2018 Ottawa, Ontario Department of Indigenous Services Canada

The Government of Canada is committed to a renewed relationship with Indigenous peoples; one that is based on the recognition of rights, respect, cooperation and partnership. As part of the Prime Minister’s announcement in August 2017, the department of Indigenous Services Canada (DISC) was created as one of two new departments to bolster this renewed relationship, and ‎address the unacceptable socio-economic gaps that exist between Indigenous peoples and non-Indigenous Canadians.

DISC is building on the work already done in Budget 2016 and 2017 and is responsible for improving the delivery and quality of day-to-day services for First Nations, Inuit, and Métis Nation, while also supporting the path to self-determination of Indigenous peoples who rightfully want and need to control service delivery for their own people.

Over the past two years, progress has been made in many areas; reducing the number of long-term drinking water advisories ‎on public systems on reserve, thousands of new housing units built, new investments for education programming and infrastructure, mental health and crisis supports for communities, and advancing a new fiscal relationship.  But, we know that there is much more work ahead, and we are committed to working in partnership with Indigenous peoples in doing so.

‎To help outline some of the next steps, the Honourable Jane Philpott, Minister of Indigenous Services and Jean-François Tremblay, Deputy Minister of Indigenous Services, today held a media briefing to outline the key priorities of the new department of Indigenous Services Canada.

The presentation outlined some of the current challenges, points of progress since November 2015, and the path forward, in five key priority areas:

• Improving Health outcomes
• Quality Education
• Child & Family Services
• Reliable Infrastructure, including Housing & Water
• A New Fiscal Relationship

Quotes

“The Government of Canada is committed to helping improve the lives of Indigenous Canadians.  There is an incredible amount of important work ahead – work to be done in partnership with Indigenous peoples – to address the inequities and priorities of First Nations, Inuit, and Métis Nation. that is why I was pleased to outline the new department’s key priorities today on how we will improve services for Indigenous peoples and support the path to self-determination.”

The Honourable Jane Philpott, M.D., P.C., M.P.
Minister of Indigenous Services

Associated Links

Contacts

Andrew MacKendrick
Office of the Honourable Jane Philpott
819-956-5372

Media Relations
Department of Indigenous Services Canada
819-953-1160

NT5

MFNERC: Next Education Directors’ Meeting

Mark your calendars for the next Education Directors’ meeting taking place in Winnipeg.

In partnership with the Assembly of Manitoba Chiefs, we will host the next ED meeting on February 5-6, 2018 at the Best Western Plus Winnipeg Airport. You can find the travel/registration form below. Please fill it out and fax back to Christa Lee at 204-942-2490. If you have any questions please contact Christa at 204-594-1290 ext. 2149 or christal@mfnerc.com. An agenda will be forwarded once it is finalized.

Thank you, and we look forward to seeing you in Winnipeg!

Letter of invite and registration form

NT5

Government of Canada provides skills training and job opportunities for young Canadians in Toronto

January 23, 2018                   Toronto, Ontario            Employment and Social Development Canada

Building a strong middle class means giving Canada’s youth the tools they need to find and keep good jobs.

Today, the Honourable Patty Hajdu, Minister of Employment, Workforce Development and Labour, announced funding that will help young Canadians develop their skills and get hands-on work experience during a visit at Youth Employment Services.

The Government of Canada will provide almost $8 million in funding to Youth Employment Services for its BizStart and Youth Collaboration/Job Central projects through the Skills Link program. These projects will help up to 1188 youth gain work experience and develop the skills they need to launch or grow a business, find and keep good-quality jobs or return to school. Through the BizStart project, participants will receive entrepreneurial training, which can include training in marketing, business planning, management, web design and other business-related topics. Youth are then matched with a mentor from the business community for ongoing support and advice. Through the Youth Collaboration/Job Central project, participants get valuable work experience with local employers in industries such as retail, food service, trades/construction, and hospitality/tourism.

Quotes

“We know that our communities are healthier and stronger when everyone can fully participate. Supporting youth as they transition into the workforce and providing them with the training they need to succeed is a key way in which we can grow our economy and strengthen the middle class.”
– The Honourable Patty Hajdu, Minister of Employment, Workforce Development and Labour

“The Government of Canada’s funding and support has helped Youth Employment Services and youth employment providers across the country change countless lives.  For every dollar of funding, it returns several to the economy in terms of tax revenues and reducing social services, and helps create a sense of self-worth and dignity for each individual.”
– Timothy Lang,  President and Chief Executive Officer, Youth Employment Services

Quick Facts

  • Each year, the Government invests more than $330 million in the Youth Employment Strategy to help young people gain the skills, abilities and work experience they need to find and maintain good employment.
  • Budget 2016 invested an additional $165.4 million in the Youth Employment Strategy in 2016–17.
  • Budget 2017 invested an additional $395.5 million over three years in the Youth Employment Strategy, starting in 2017–18. Combined with Budget 2016 measures, these investments will help:
    • more than 33,000 vulnerable youth develop the skills they need to find work or go back to school;
    • create 15,000 new green jobs for youth; and
    • provide over 1,600 new employment opportunities for youth in the heritage sector.

Associated Links

Contacts

Matt Pascuzzo
Press Secretary
Office of the Honourable Patty Hajdu, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Employment, Workforce Development and Labour
matt.pascuzzo@hrsdc-rhdcc.gc.ca
819-654-5613

Media Relations Office
Employment and Social Development Canada
819-994-5559
media@hrsdc-rhdcc.gc.ca

NT4

Project aims to narrow ‘precision medicine’ gap for Indigenous peoples in Canada – The Globe and Mail

January 23, 2018

The ability of researchers and doctors to more easily and cheaply sequence a patient’s entire genome has launched a new era of “precision medicine,” in which treatments can be tailored to the specific genetic variations that may underlie a disorder or disease.

For Indigenous peoples in Canada, however, the technique has only increased the gap in medical care. Not only is it harder for people in Indigenous communities to gain access to the technology, a lack of data on the genetic variations within those communities means the technology is also less effective.

Now a team of British Columbia-based researchers is hoping to narrow the gap by creating a system with which Indigenous people can gather and oversee their own genetic data in order to improve diagnoses and health outcomes related to genetic disease.

Read More: https://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/project-aims-to-narrow-prescision-medicine-gap-for-indigenous-peoples-in-canada/article37698712/

Canada faces angry Americans in pivotal sixth round of NAFTA talks – CP

Source: The Canadian Press
Jan 23, 2018 10:46

By Mike Blanchfield and Alexander Panetta

THE CANADIAN PRESS

Canada will be hosting an annoyed and angry United States as the sixth round of talks in the North American Free Trade Agreement renegotiation unfold over the coming week.

The Trump administration is making known its displeasure about Canada’s contributions to date and demanding progress over the marathon 10-day session.

Multiple sources aware of the U.S. administration’s views say the acrimony has a variety of causes, including Canada’s recent decision to file a sweeping complaint about U.S. trade practices at the World Trade Organization and its pursuit of a progressive trade agenda that includes Indigenous and labour provisions.

The rhetoric around its implacable rejection of the most controversial U.S. positions _ raising continental content provisions on automobiles, scrapping a dispute resolution mechanism, limiting Canadian access to U.S. procurement, and instituting a five-year sunset clause _ as well as bitterness over apparent leaks are all fuelling the U.S. animosity towards Canada, say sources.

Sources familiar with the Canadian position dismiss all that and say the tone at the negotiating table is professional and cordial, and that Canada is prepared to table counter-proposals in order to make progress.

They say Canadian negotiators are making constructive proposals to find common ground with the Americans on what some have called poison pills designed to kill the deal.

Indeed, Canada, the U.S. and Mexico are showing signs they all want to see tangible progress in this round in order keep the negotiations on track, and discourage U.S. President Donald Trump from announcing his intent to withdraw from NAFTA.

It will be another week before Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland, American counterpart Robert Lighthizer and Mexico’s Ildefonso Guajardo arrive in Montreal on Jan. 29 to close the extended round that gets underway earlier than planned on Sunday.

The way some see it, Lighthizer is in no hurry to come back to Canada.

“The feeling of ill will between Bob Lighthizer’s office and the Canadians _ I don’t think you can underestimate it,” said Sarah Goldfeder, a former U.S. diplomat who now represents American clients in an Ottawa consultancy.

“He’s extremely frustrated with China and Canada,” added Goldfeder.

“Those are the two countries he thinks are being most unfair to the United States ? Those are the ones taking up a good chunk of his time, and not in positive ways.”

Goldfeder noted that when Freeland went to Washington two weeks ago she met Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross and members of Congress _ but not Lighthizer.

When Guajardo visited later in the month, Lighthizer’s door was open to him, she said.

Colin Robertson, a retired diplomat with extensive experience in the U.S., said the body language between Lighthizer and Freeland is “terrible,” which is telling.

“He’s a bully and she gets under his skin,” said Robertson. “She and Guajardo are amigos. No one would say that about Freeland and Lighthizer.”

Canadian officials say Freeland and Lighthizer intend to meet this week while the two are in Davos, Switzerland for the annual meeting of the World Economic Forum.

Lighthizer isn’t willing to blow up NAFTA over the WTO challenge, but Canada should brace for some bilateral retaliation. Meanwhile, his office isn’t interested in the Canadian progressive trade agenda _ entrenching Indigenous, gender and workers’ rights issues in the pact _ because it has the whiff of Canada dictating social policy to the U.S., Goldfeder said.

Lori Wallach, the director of Public Citizen’s Global Trade Watch, a group normally at odds with the Republicans, was also critical of the Canadian posture.

“Canada is 100 per cent not engaged. Mexico started engaging in the last month or so,” said Wallach, who knows Lighthizer.

”Probably after the Montreal round, that increases the prospect that there could be a notice of withdrawal.“

Ottawa is defensive. The characterization of Canada as obstructionist is nonsense, and the product of strategic leaking of information, according to another official familiar with the content of talks, and who agreed to speak anonymously citing the sensitivity of the ongoing negotiations.

The official said Canadian and American negotiators, as well as their Mexican counterparts, know each other well and are working methodically in the 30 separate negotiating rooms to make incremental progress.

The official pointed to Freeland’s Jan. 11 comments at the Liberal cabinet retreat in London, Ont. as evidence Canada is doing some “creative thinking” about how to deal with “unconventional” U.S. proposals.

The complaints about Canada’s progressive trade agenda are also a bit rich, the official said, because the real obstacles are more fundamental _ the American poison pill proposals that wouldn’t fly in any trade negotiation.

In particular, the official cited the U.S. proposal to ditch the dispute resolution mechanism, saying Americans remember full well that former Progressive Conservative prime minister Brian Mulroney considered that idea a deal breaker during the original Canada-U.S. free trade talks in 1988.

Freeland told CTV’s Question Period on Sunday that the progressive chapters on labour, gender, environment and Indigenous issues are not a problem. She said the Indigenous chapter would be discussed for the first time in Montreal.

Assembly of First Nations National Chief Perry Bellegarde said it’s about time _ he has pushed Freeland hard on the issue in recent months as part of her NAFTA advisory committee. Bellegarde told The Canadian Press he hopes the Americans and Mexicans support a chapter affirming Indigenous Peoples’ inclusion in the economy.

“Canada is supporting that,” he said.

“Tuesday will be the first formal response by U.S.A., Mexico to that new chapter, and so it’s very important.”

Today’s NAFTA talks are unusual because Canada is being told it needs to give up benefits or lose access to its fundamental trading partner, said Eric Miller, head of the Rideau Potomac Strategy Group in Washington.

“Canada’s economic livelihood is on the line,” said Miller, a former Canadian official who worked on the auto bailout.

“One should expect Canada to be very focused on it, and to react very strongly.”

INDEX: TRADE NATIONAL BUSINESS POLITICS

VIU Writers Tackle Assimilation, Cultural Collaborations and Acceptance in Spring Colloquium Series

January 22, 2018 – 3:45pm

Free public lecture series hosted by the Faculty of Arts and Humanities starts Friday, January 26

From overwriting the Bard, to Seamus Heaney’s contributions to the world, to a unique playwriting collaboration, community members will get to look at the world from several different writers’ perspectives during The Arts and Humanities Colloquium Series spring lineup.

The Colloquium presentations are a way for Vancouver Island University (VIU) Arts and Humanities faculty to share their research and other work with a wider audience. All three spring talks are delivered by professors in the Creative Writing and English departments.

“The spring lineup offers our audience an opportunity to reflect on how and why writers write – their motivation and techniques,” says Dr. Katharine Rollwagen, a VIU History Professor and Chair of The Arts and Humanities Colloquium Committee. “The presentations also underline how poetry and drama often grapple with issues that are central to our culture while also helping us think more about who we are – collectively and as individuals.”

On January 26, VIU English and Creative Writing professor and poet Dr. Sonnet L’Abbé will share her latest large-scale poetic project – Sonnet’s Shakespeare – in which she literally overwrites the Bard. For each of Shakespeare’s 154 sonnets, L’Abbé writes hers over top, overwhelming the original text and assimilating the Bard’s words into hers.

“I’d been thinking a lot about assimilation, how power structures mean that some voices dominate others, and whether as a woman of colour my voice could ever be heard above the most dominant ones,” she says. “I invented a form of poem that allowed me to figuratively take up the space that Shakespeare occupies.”

L’Abbé will discuss her technique, her artistic influences and the personal experiences that informed the work.

On February 16, Dr. Timothy Brownlow, a Professor Emeritus with the English Department, will discuss working with world-renowned poet Seamus Heaney when Brownlow was co-editor of a literary magazine in Dublin in the early 1960s. At the time, Heaney, who went on to receive the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1995, had not yet become well-known. Part of Brownlow’s talk will describe watching Heaney’s rise to fame and what made his work resonate with people.

“Sales of his work vastly outnumbered the sales of any other modern poet,” says Brownlow. “People who don’t normally read poetry find him very accessible. His greatness lies I think in keeping his vision intact – he was very rooted in many old-fashioned values – and being very unassuming and down-to-earth.”

The spring series finishes on March 23 when English Professor Dr. Nelson Gray examines what happens when two playwrights write the same story, but from a different perspective. Growing up in a small mill town in the interior of BC, a traumatic childhood incident inspired Gray to write a fictional play about an Indigenous girl who runs away from residential school.

When he started writing the play in the 1990s, from the perspective of a 15-year-old-boy, he invited Marie Clements, who is now an award-winning Metis playwright, director and film producer, to help flush out her voice. She ended up writing her own version of the play instead – from the perspective of the girl.

“When I read Marie’s play, it was just like stepping through the looking glass – she presented a world view that was astonishing to me because it was so fundamentally different than the experience I had growing up in that place,” says Gray, adding that Talon Books is publishing both manuscripts this spring in one book.

“The book is a positive statement of how people and individuals who come from different world views can be engaged in productive and positive dialogue in a way that respects differences and encourages communication,” he says.

The presentations take place in the Malaspina Theatre (Building 310) from 10 – 11:30 am. Limited complimentary parking is available in lot 5D off Fifth Street. Visit the Colloquium Serieshomepage to learn more.
-30-

MEDIA CONTACT:

Jenn McGarrigle, Communications Officer, Vancouver Island University
P: 250.740.6559 | C: 250.619.6860 | E: Jenn.McGarrigle@viu.ca

NT5

Actua Receives $10 Million in Government of Canada CanCode Program Funding

Ottawa, January 22, 2018/ ​Today the Honourable Navdeep Bains, Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development announced that Actua will receive $10 million in funding from the Government of Canada’s new CanCode program.

“Coding is the next big job. Industries ranging from automotive and agri-food to the life sciences and clean technology need coders, given their increasingly digital nature. That’s why our government is equipping Canadian youth with the digital skills they need for the jobs of the future. By teaching kids to code today, we’re positioning Canada for future success across all indus tries and sectors,” said the Honourable Navdeep Bains, Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development.

The CanCode program is a historic investment by the Government of Canada of $50 million over two years that will support increased access to opportunities for coding and digital skills building for youth in grades K-12. Actua’s funding will be used to increase program delivery across Canada by its 35 network member programs located at universities and colleges across Canada, and its Outreach Team which delivers across the North. It will also support research, teacher training​​(providing teachers training in coding and digital skills as well as resources they can use in the classroom), and Maker Mobile Workshops.

Over the two-year period, ​Actua will engage a total of​​500,000 youth across every province and territory.

“We are honoured to be a recipient of CanCode funding and thrilled to provide additional support to our network members to engage more youth in building digital skills,” said Jennifer Flanagan, President and CEO of Actua. “This support means that hundreds of thousands more youth, including 35,000 Indigenous youth, will have the opportunity to access free, deep-impact, face-to-face learning experiences which are critical to their future success and our future Canadian workforce.”

Actua’s CanCode funding will be matched by several of its corporate supporters including Google Canada and Microsoft.

“We’re thrilled to see an investment in programs that will nurture the next generation of Canada’s technology builders. That’s why we support Actua through our Codemakers program, which has helped hundreds of thousands of young Canadians learn about the technology that is shaping our world. We need more students pursuing an education in Computer Science, particularly those who have historically been underrepresented in the field, and today’s announcement will help make that a reality. ​Computer Science is not the language of ones and zeros. It’s the language of creativity, entrepreneurship and potential,” said Sabrina Geremia, Country Director at Google.

About Actua: ​Actua is Canada’s leading science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) youth outreach network representing 35 university and college based members. Each year 250,000 young Canadians in over 500 communities nationwide are inspired through hands-on educational workshops, camps and community outreach initiatives. Actua focuses on the engagement of underrepresented youth through specialized programs for Indigenous youth, girls and young women, at-risk youth and youth living in Northern and remote communities. Actua’s major funders include: Government of Canada, Google Canada, Suncor Energy Foundation, GE Canada, the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, Ontario Trillium Foundation, Finning, Toyota Canada Foundation and Lockheed Martin. For more information about Actua, visit actua.ca.

​- 30 –

Contact Information:

Kristina Martin, Director of Communications, Actua
111 Murray Street, Ottawa ON K1N 5M5|
Office: (613) 234 4137 Cell: (613) 882-8432
E​mail: ​kristina.martin@actua.ca
Web: ​www.actua.ca

NT5

For the record, January 23, 2018 – Business in Vancouver

Email your For the Record information to: fortherecord@biv.com. Please include a high-resolution, colour headshot where possible.

Jan. 23, 2018

DEVELOPMENT/CONSTRUCTION

Daniel Sorger has been appointed vice-president of corporate finance at Atlas Cloud Enterprises Inc. Sorger is currently a director at Rockshield Capital, a venture fund and merchant bank, as well as co-founder and partner of Cannabis Invest UK. Previously, Sorger worked at RBC in Toronto as vice-president of institutional equities sales and at Macquarie Capital in London, U.K.

FINANCE

Daniel Sorger has been appointed vice-president of corporate finance at Atlas Cloud Enterprises Inc.Sorger is currently a director at Rockshield Capital, a venture fund and merchant bank, as well as co-founder and partner of Cannabis Invest UK. Previously, Sorger worked at RBC in Toronto as vice-president of institutional equities sales and atMacquarie Capital in London, U.K.

Read More: https://www.biv.com/article/2018/1/record-january-23-2018/

Investing in the Arts in Yellowknife

YELLOWKNIFE, January 22, 2018

Today, Michael McLeod, Member of Parliament (Northwest Territories), announced total funding of $727,000 to the Northern Arts and Cultural Centre (NACC), Folk on the Rocks (FOTR) and the Association franco-culturelle de Yellowknife (ACFY). Mr. McLeod made this announcement on behalf of the Honourable Mélanie Joly, Minister of Canadian Heritage and was accompanied by Arif Virani, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Canadian Heritage (Multiculturalism).

Funding is provided through the Canada Arts Presentation Fund which supports organizations that professionally present arts festivals or performing arts series, as well as organizations that offer support to arts presenters. This helps ensure that Canadians have access to a variety of professional artistic experiences in their communities.

Quotes

“Our government is proud to support organizations like these, which provide Canadians with high-quality artistic experiences in their communities. Through Creative Canada, the first-ever federal strategy to grow Canada’s creative industries, our government will continue to support our artists and creators in doing what they do best: telling our stories and bringing our culture to life.”

—The Honourable Mélanie Joly, Minister of Canadian Heritage

“This funding will ensure that these organizations will continue to offer the valuable programming they’ve worked so hard to develop, while ensuring that Northerners continue to enjoy the benefits of their efforts, talents and success.”

—Michael McLeod, Member of Parliament (Northwest Territories)

“The Northern Arts and Cultural Centre has an incredibly supportive community, having established an outstanding record of artistic achievements over the past 33 years. The theatre collaborates with artists and arts organizations across the territory to help create a national stage for the performing arts, and acts as a catalyst for performance, creation and learning. The organization has always been at the front of youth and educational activities, offering artistic presentations, training and programs for youth and children. Thanks to the continued support of Canadian Heritage, we are able to have a renewed focus on growing local performing arts repertoire and nurturing talent by presenting, commissioning, creating and producing works from the North and around the world.”

—Marie Coderre, Executive and Artistic Director, Northern Arts & Cultural Centre

Quick Facts

  • NACC encourages the development of the performing arts from all cultural traditions and provides a venue in the Northwest Territories for communities and professionally produced performances. Funding will be used to support their performing arts series as well as the Storytelling Festival. NACC is receiving $570,000 in funding ($190,000 per year over three years).
  • ACFY is a multi-disciplinary arts presenting organization that serves the Franco-Ténois community in Yellowknife. AFCY offers artistic performances and cultural programming with a focus on attracting families and youth. Funding will be used to support its “Plein feux sur la scène nordique” performing arts series. The AFCY is receiving $120,000 ($30,000 per year over four years).
  • FOTR advances the development of the performing arts in the Northwest Territories and promotes and supports Northern talent in music, art and entertainment. Funding will be used to support the 38th edition of its annual music festival, as well outreach activities, school programming and off-season concerts. FOTR is receiving $37,000 in funding.

Associated Links

Contacts

For more information (media only), please contact:

Simon Ross
Press Secretary
Office of the Minister of Canadian Heritage
819-997-7788

Media Relations
Canadian Heritage
819-994-9101
1-866-569-6155
pch.media-media.pch@canada.ca

NT4

10 Things to Know for Today – CP

Source: The Associated Press
Jan 23, 2018 6:34

Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events and the stories that will be talked about today:

1. ALASKA EARTHQUAKE PROMPTS TSUNAMI WARNING

The temblor with a preliminary magnitude of 8.2 off Kodiak Island prompts a tsunami warning for a large swath of the state’s coast and British Columbia.

2. SENATORS STRIKE DEAL RE-OPENING GOVERNMENT

A stop-gap spending measure will keep the government open until Feb. 8, meaning hundreds of thousands of federal workers can return to work.

3. WHO MADE JOKES IN RARE PUBLIC APPEARANCE

Bill Cosby quips that he “used to be a comedian” and played with a jazz band in Philadelphia as a retrial looms in his criminal sexual assault case.

4. WHAT HAS PAKISTAN SAYING ‘ME TOO’

The brutal rape and killing of a 7-year-old Pakistani girl whose body was left in a garbage dump prompts women to come forward with their stories of sexual abuse.

5. TRUMP’S GLOBAL GAG RULE GOES FAR BEYOND ABORTION

Health groups say impoverished women around the world are being left without treatment for HIV, malaria and other diseases.

6. GUN SHOW GATHERS JUST A FEW MILES FROM MASS SHOOTING

The industry is holding its biggest annual trade show in Las Vegas and what will be on display will be shielded from the public and the general-interest media.

7. MODI GIVES KEYNOTE AT WORLD ECONOMIC FORUM

The Indian prime minister says the recent wave of trade protectionism, in which governments raise barriers to free trade between nations, is “worrisome.”

8. HOPE, FEAR AS PUERTO RICO MOVES TO PRIVATIZE POWER COMPANY

The announcement has many on the island of 3.3 million people asking whether this will finally bring them more affordable electric bills and more reliable service.

9. OSCAR NOMINATIONS SET TO TAKE ‘SHAPE’

Guillermo del Toro’s lavish monster romance “The Shape of Water” has a chance to tie “All About Eve,” ”Titanic“ and ”La La Land“ with a record 14 nominations.

10. BRITAIN GETS OPEN SEMIFINALIST NOT NAMED MURRAY

There will be a British man in the Australian Open semifinals for the seventh time in nine years, but this time it’ll be Kyle Edmund, not Andy Murray.

INDEX: INTERNATIONAL

Nearly 4 years on, a grieving mother prepares to tell her story again – CBC

About 30 families are expected to testify at the MMIWG hearings in Yellowknife this week

Jan 23, 2018

When Louisa Lafferty walks into a hearing room in Yellowknife this week to speak about the horrific murder of her 23-year-old daughter Charlotte, the only people listening will be a support worker and a commissioner from the national inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls.

She won’t be speaking in the large hotel ballroom where the public hearings will be held because she is fearful that she could say something that might jeopardize her daughter’s case and aid an appeal launched by the man convicted in her death.

Approximately 30 families are expected to testify about their cases.

“I feel very nervous,” Lafferty says.

Read More: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/edmonton/mmiwg-fort-good-hope-charlotte-lafferty-1.4499371

Tsunami fears send people in B.C. to higher ground; warning ends after quake – CP

Source: The Associated Press
Jan 23, 2018 8:27

DAVOS, Switzerland _ The Latest on the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland (all times local):

2:25 p.m.

A leading British investment manager says that a catastrophic IT crash that puts markets out of action for several days could be the catalyst to another financial crisis.

Anna Richards, chief executive of London-based M&G Investments, says the next financial crisis is unlikely to emerge from a geopolitical event, as markets are used to dealing with such events on a regular basis.

More worrying for Richards are the technological innovations that have fundamentally altered the way markets operate and that investors are “somewhat blind to.”

She told the World Economic Forum: “We all have businesses which are absolutely reliant on a very small number of people who provide the pipes that effectively we all put our business though.”

How markets react if no one could trade for “one, two or three days” would be “kind of interesting,” she added.

___

1:50 p.m.

Prime Minister Narendra Modi says India’s economy would more than double and touch $5 trillion by 2025.

Modi made the comments in his keynote speech at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland.

Speaking in Hindi, Modi added that when an Indian prime minister was in Davos last in 1997 India’s GDP was a “little more than $400 billion and now two decades later it’s about six times that amount.”

He said that his government was committed to boosting economic growth and reducing bureaucratic hurdles to doing business in India. He said his government was committed to making the economy attractive for investment.

___

1:00 p.m.

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi says his government is committed to working to save the environment and alleviating the impact of climate change.

Modi said Tuesday that his government had set itself the ambitious target of producing 175 GW of renewable energy by 2022. In the past three years India has been able to produce about 60GW of renewable energy.

He made the comments as he delivered the keynote address to the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland.

Modi added that the developed world needed to do more to help poorer nations combat the effects of climate change.

Modi said that while everyone talked about reducing carbon emissions, very few developed countries backed that up by helping developing nations like India with resources to adopt appropriate new technologies to that end.

___

12:10 p.m.

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi says the recent wave of trade protectionism, in which governments raise barriers to free trade between nations, is “worrisome.”

Modi delivered the warning in a speech Tuesday just hours after the U.S. government of President Donald Trump approved tariffs on imported solar-energy components and large washing machines in a bid to help U.S. manufacturers.

In a keynote address to the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, Modi said that “forces of protectionism are raising their heads against globalization.” Without directly mentioning Trump or the U.S., he said “the solution to this worrisome situation against globalization is not isolation.”

He quoted Mohandas Gandhi: “I don’t want the windows of my house to be closed from all directions. I want the winds of cultures of all countries to enter my house with aplomb and go out also.”

___

11:35 a.m.

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi is drawing a crowd in Davos.

IMF Managing Director Christine Lagarde, Presidents Paul Kagame of Rwanda and Emmerson Mnangagwa of Zimbabwe, and former U.S. Vice-President Al Gore have poured into a Davos ballroom to hear the Indian leader’s keynote speech for the World Economic Forum this year.

Swiss President Alain Berset set up the stage for Modi, appealing to the hundreds of people in the crowd: “Let us make 2018 a year in which we overcome the phase of hand-wringing and self-criticism, in which each of us works to promote social inclusion.”

___

11:15 a.m.

An expert on global financial crises is downplaying fears that the world is set for another downturn.

A decade on from the last crash, Professor Kenneth Rogoff from Harvard University says there is “no plan A” to deal with another crisis given that interest rates remain at super-low levels and public finances remain stretched.

However, Rogoff told an audience at the World Economic Forum that financial crises have a “long afterlife” and that “we’re actually at the tail-end of the last one.”

Fears have risen recently that the global economy may be heading for another downturn, with many worried about the scale of gains in global stock markets and even the huge volatility in trading of virtual currencies like Bitcoin.

Still, he said China is the country that’s exhibiting many of the characteristics of a “typical financial crisis building up.”

___

10:35 a.m.

A German business leader is warning U.S. President Donald Trump that his decision to slap tariffs on imported solar panels and washing machines will backfire.

On Monday, Trump approved the tariffs in a bid to help domestic manufacturers.

However, Frank Appel, CEO of Deutsche Post DHL, told an audience at the World Economic Forum Tuesday that the move will hurt exactly those who Trump is ostensibly trying to help.

He said: “Even if the U.S. does more protectionism, consumers will buy from different places and who pays the bill? All the employees in the U.S. finally.”

Tidjane Thiam, the CEO of Swiss bank Credit Suisse, said he remains bullish on global trade despite the tariffs decision.

He said: “We will need to see how it impacts global trade, how other trading blocs react to that, but I remain optimistic. I think we are in exceptionally favourable context.”

___

9:55 a.m.

Stock markets around the world are flying high amid a synchronized global upturn but a leading U.S. investor is warning of a potential “reckoning.”

Stephen Schwarzman, chairman and CEO of Blackstone, told an audience at the World Economic Forum that the markets have responded to a positive global economic growth story. It is, he said, a time of “enormous ebullience.”

However, he said there are “lurking” geopolitical risks out there that could put the knock markets off track and there will come a time when some of these problems are “not contained.”

U.S. stock markets have been in particularly strong, with the Dow Jones industrial average hitting a run of record highs on the back of confidence around the U.S. economy and President Donald Trump’s big tax reform package.

___

6:00 a.m.

The World Economic Forum officially gets underway Tuesday with Indian leader Narendra Modi delivering the keynote speech.

Modi was meant to be the event’s highlight until President Donald Trump decided to come as well. Trump is due to speak Friday, though the U.S. government shutdown has put his presence in doubt.

There will be much interest in Modi, who follows on from Chinese President Xi Jinping’s address to the global elite at last year’s event. Xi portrayed his country as a champion of free trade on the same week Trump was inaugurated president.

Modi will likely tout India’s economic successes and stress that his country is also open for business.

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is later due to address the Davos crowd, which is gathering in unusually heavy snowfall.

INDEX: INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS

2019 National Aboriginal Hockey Championships – Call for Bids

The Aboriginal Sport Circle (ASC) established the National Aboriginal Hockey Championships (NAHC) in 2002 to serve as the premiere competition for young Aboriginal hockey players in Canada. It provides a forum for elite Bantam/Midget aged Aboriginal male and female youth and attracts participation from First Nations, Inuit and Metis across thirteen provinces and territories. This annual event helps foster cultural unity and pride to celebrate the athletic abilities of Aboriginal athletes from across the country.

The ASC will co-host its’ 18th annual National Aboriginal Hockey Championships (NAHC) in May 2019. The bid process and guidelines for the 2019 NAHC as outlined below, will be used by Aboriginal communities and Provincial/Territorial Aboriginal Sport Bodies interested in hosting this prestigious event.

BID PROCESS AND GUIDELINES

Eligibility and Target Dates

The ASC is actively seeking bids to host the 2019 NAHC. To be eligible, the bid must be approved by its Provincial/Territorial Aboriginal Sport Body (P/TASB). Only one community can bid per Province/Territory. (See attached PTASB listing)

As a sanctioned Hockey Canada event, the NAHC are staged annually during the first two weeks in May (ie: May 7-13, 2019). This ensures that the NAHC do not conflict with any of the Provincial/Territorial Bantam and Midget Hockey Championships. The NAHC is a week-long event with opening ceremonies conducted on the first day and closing awards ceremonies conducted following the final Gold Medal Game. A Team Social event may also be hosted mid-week, time permitting. The ASC will only entertain bids from communities that guarantee that no other major event will be staged locally during the dates of the NAHC.

The NAHC facility requirements are as follows: a minimum of two ice surfaces – the primary arena being National Hockey League regulation size (85’ x 200’) with seating for a minimum of 500 spectators. Likewise, the community must be within 150 kilometers from a regional airport, which offers daily flights from major airlines. Should the bidding community be outside the 150-kilometer radius, they must submit a travel plan that includes financial and logistical support for participating teams.

Read More: http://www.aboriginalsportcircle.ca/en/pdf/2019NahcBid.pdf

NT4

Civic Census Takers Required – City of Calgary

Calgary, AB, 22 January 2018

Interested in doing a job that counts? The City of Calgary is recruiting Census Takers.

The Census team collects valuable information used in many aspects of City planning and service delivery. Applications are received in person at The City of Calgary, Election and Census office at 1103 55 Avenue N.E. from Jan. 22 to Feb. 9, Monday to Friday, between 8:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Application forms are available online at calgary.ca/census and can be downloaded and brought in person. In addition to the application form a skills assessment is completed in person at the time of application.

In order to apply to be a Census Taker you must be:

  • 18 years of age or over.
  • available to conduct census collection and voter registration information in late April.
  • able to walk in seasonable weather conditions.
  • able to complete online training at home, and available for an in-person session in March
  • able to operate a tablet computer (training is provided).

Applicants can find more information and download the application form by visiting calgary.ca/census or calling 403-476-4100 (option 3).

Beginning late April, Census Takers go door-to-door visiting all homes in their assigned area to collect census and voter registration information. Assigned census areas vary in size, but are generally between 400 to 600 dwellings. Census Takers set their own schedule to complete their assigned area and may be required to work in the evenings and on weekends when most people are at home. In general, the data collection takes about three weeks.

The online census will begin April 1, where citizens will be able to fill out their own information through our website using an access code sent in the mail. The remainder of households who did not participate in the census online will have their census data collected by Census Takers and Enumerators beginning in late April.

Applicants are being placed as they apply.

For more information on Calgary’s annual Census, visit calgary.ca/Census.

-30-

NT4

Farnworth statement on tsunami warning downgrade – Government of BC

January 23, 2018

VICTORIA – Statement from Minister of Public Safety Mike Farnworth:

“A tsunami warning on the Coast of B.C. has now been cancelled.

“Overnight, several communities along the coast activated their emergency plans and evacuated those at risk.

“Emergency Management BC activated the Provincial Emergency Co-ordination Centre, and five provincial regional operations centers. The agency also supported local governments to evacuate residents. Although the tsunami warning was eventually suspended, this event demonstrates that coast warning systems do work.

“Please do NOT call 911 for information on the tsunami in B.C. – only call 911 when a life is at stake. It is important these lines are freed-up for those in immediate need.

“In the event of a future tsunami warning, stay calm, stay safe; listen to your local officials and head to higher ground.”

Contact:

Jordan Turner
Communications Manager
250 896-1928

NT5

Canada, TPP members agree to revised deal without the U.S. – CP

Source: The Canadian Press
Jan 23, 2018 7:51

By Andy Blatchford

THE CANADIAN PRESS

OTTAWA _ Canada and the remaining members of the Trans-Pacific Partnership agreed Tuesday to a revised trade agreement without the United States.

The deal, confirmed by Singapore’s government, follows two days of high-level talks in Tokyo between Canada and the 10 other remaining TPP economies. The partners will now work toward signing the agreement by early March, Singapore’s trade and industry ministry said in a statement.

The deal was announced just hours after a Canadian government official said Ottawa was optimistic that a revised TPP pact would be reached as early as Tuesday.

The official, who spoke on condition of anonymity, told The Canadian Press that Ottawa believed a deal could be struck, even though it would still like to see more progress on negotiations surrounding the automotive and cultural sectors.

Canada, the second-largest economy among the TPP partners, was widely considered the main holdout in the negotiations.

The Tokyo talks were the first high-level talks since the leaders of the TPP economies met in November on the sidelines of the APEC summit in Danang, Vietnam.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau made international headlines there by deciding not to sign an agreement-in-principle on what has become known as TPP11.

Trudeau’s decision in Vietnam to continue negotiating for a better deal, rather than striking an agreement, led to the abrupt cancellation of a TPP leaders’ meeting in Danang.

Many believed the original TPP took a fatal blow when Donald Trump withdrew from the deal in one of his first acts as U.S. president.

The TPP agreement was reached as Canada faces a tough renegotiation of the North American Free Trade Agreement. NAFTA negotiators from Canada, the United States and Mexico are meeting in Montreal this week.

The government official said Trudeau had been bringing up the Asia-Pacific trade pact in recent months every time he’s had conversations with leaders from the other partner economies. Over the last week, he discussed the deal with the leaders of New Zealand and Chile by phone.

Trudeau also dispatched well-connected Vancouver Economic Commission chief executive Ian McKay as his personal envoy at this

week’s negotiations in Japan, the official said. McKay, a former national director of Trudeau’s Liberal party, has “deep knowledge” of business in Japan and was engaging with the Japanese government at the highest level, they added.

McKay joined Canada’s chief and deputy chief TPP negotiators in Tokyo for two days of talks that were scheduled to wrap up Tuesday.

The 11 remaining TPP economies started working to salvage the deal after Trump withdrew last year.

Many of those leaders thought an agreement-in-principle was within reach in November.

Trudeau made international headlines at the Asia-Pacific Economic Co-operation summit in Danang deciding not to sign an agreement-in-principle on what has become known as TPP11. Partner economies had been expecting him to come to an agreement.

He also made headlines at the summit for how he went about declining the deal.

Trudeau’s decision to continue negotiating for a better deal, rather than striking an agreement, led to the abrupt cancellation of a TPP leaders’ meeting on the sidelines of a summit.

The cancellation set off a confusing day of talks. Media reports directly blamed Canada and Trudeau for helping to scuttle the scheduled meeting.

But Trudeau later argued he had sent signals for days that he would not be rushed into a deal unless it was the right one.

TPP trade ministers did agree to a number of changes to nudge negotiations closer to a deal, including stronger protections for the environment and labour rights. They also suspended controversial provisions from the original TPP related to intellectual property, which the Canadian tech sector had long called on Ottawa to remove from the deal.

The pact was also rebranded the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership.

Besides Canada, the TPP11 partners are Australia, Brunei, Chile, Japan, Malaysia, Mexico, New Zealand, Peru, Singapore, and Vietnam.

Most importantly, the deal would open up access for Canada to Japan’s economy, the third-largest in the world. Canada’s agricultural, seafood and forestry sectors would see some of the greatest benefits, the official said.

The official insisted that International Trade Minister Francois-Philippe Champagne and Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland have also remained engaged with their TPP11 counterparts.

They added that Trudeau’s principal secretary, Gerald Butts, met with Japan’s ambassador last week to discuss the deal.

“We’ve made real progress both before and since Danang,” the official said.

A spokesman for Champagne wrote in an email late Monday that the government is trying to get the best deal for Canadian workers and businesses.

“As success will be determined over decades, it is important to get the details right,” Joseph Pickerill wrote.

“We are committed to being constructive, expeditious and ambitious towards that aim and are working collaboratively with our partners to this end.”

INDEX: TRADE NATIONAL BUSINESS POLITICS

What’s On at Trent University – Week of January 22, 2018

Upcoming events include When They Awake film screening and North at Trent Lecture Series

Monday, January 22, 2018

Every week new and exciting things are happening at Trent University. Come and be inspired through a range of events, public lectures, panel discussions and debates, all open to the community. Here’s what’s on at Trent University this month:

Wednesday, January 24, 2018

Buena Vista Social Club/El club social de Buena Vista – Spanish Movie Screening
Time: 7:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m.
Location: Stohn Hall, room 1.22, Trent Student Centre
About: This documentary traces guitarist Ry Cooder’s collaboration with a group of veteran Cuban musicians. It was directed by Wim Wenders, and was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Documentary in 2000.

Post-Glacial Palaeoecology and the Greening of the Gobi Desert: North at Trent Lecture Series
Time: 7:30 p.m. – 9:30 p.m.
Location: Bagnani Hall, Traill College
About: Dr. Lisa Janz, the Roberta Bondar Postdoctoral Fellow in Northern & Polar Studies, will deliver the first lecture of the 2018 North at Trent series. The Pleistocene-Holocene transition marked an epochal shift in global ecosystems that is closely tied to the emergence of agricultural societies. Dramatic changes in human land-use and diet are closely correlated with environmental change; however, the role that humans may have played in causing these changes, including megafaunal extinctions, is hotly debated. Archaeological research in the Gobi Desert of Mongolia and China has uncovered a number of clues for understanding Holocene ecosystems and the role of humans within them. This talk will focus on post-glacial climate change, the “greening of the Gobi,” and the role that intensive wetlands use may have had on local environments.

Thursday, January 25, 2018

When They Awake Movie Screening with Pedro Marcellino, Producer & Director
Time: 4:30 p.m. – 9:30 p.m.
Location: Stohn Hall, room 1.22, Trent Student Centre
About: When They Awake documents a remarkable generation of established and emerging Indigenous musicians in a moment of cultural and political resurgence. In this era of native resurgence, from Idle No More to Standing Rock, Indigenous musicians across North America are making their voices heard and people are starting to listen. Working in every genre from Hip Hop to Rock to EDM and beyond, a generation of native musicians are channeling the pain of the past into a stirring, hopeful vision of the future. It is this generation and their astonishing music that When They Awake bears witness. Featuring 20+ artists, including modern trailblazers A Tribe Called Red, Tanya Tagaq, Leela Gilday and Iskwé, When They Awake is a magnum opus documenting contemporary indigenous musicians as they transform historical trauma into compelling art.

Tuesday, January 30, 2018

Voices at Hand: Opening Reception at Traill College
Time: 7:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m.
Location: Senior Common Room, Scott House, Traill College
About: Award-winning local artist Wendy Trusler’s newest incarnation, Voices at Hand, is on display at Traill College. The artist will be at Traill College from noon – 4:00 p.m. and from 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m. with her exhibition from January 29 – February 2, 2018.

Wednesday, January 31, 2018

Hahhan Arendt – German Movie Screening
Time: 7:00 p.m. – 9:30 p.m.
Location: Stohn Hall, room 1.22, Trent Student Centre
About: Award-winning film, Hannah Arendt, is a new biopic of the influential German-Jewish philosopher and political theorist. Arendt’s reporting on the 1961 trial of ex-Nazi Adolf Eichmann in The New Yorker introduced her now-famous concept of the “Banality of Evil.” Using footage from the actual Eichmann trial and weaving a narrative that spans three countries, the film beautifully turns the often invisible passion for thought into immersive, dramatic cinema. An Official Selection at the Toronto International and New York Jewish Film Festivals, this movie received two Lola Awards in 2013 (German Grammy’s).

Thursday, February 1, 2018

War Without End? The Conflict over the Korena Peninsula Since 1945
Time: 7:30 p.m. – 9:00 p.m.
Location: Bagnani Hall, Traill College
About: This lecture will explore the historical roots of the present day conflict between North Korea and the United States, starting with the era of the Second World War in Asia and the Korean War. The talk will also highlight longer-term problems with the 1953 armistice, the cold war origins of the current nuclear crisis, and the history of the DPRK in the international system since the fall of the Soviet Union in 1991.

Friday, February 2, 2018

ToursPlus Peterborough: Science
Time: 9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.; 12:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.
Location: Gzowski College room 114
About: On a ToursPlus Science campus tour, future students will be able to explore a variety of different lab spaces. On their campus tour they will also see two student residence buildings, classrooms and college spaces. They’ll also have the chance to attend information sessions and mini lectures, and apply or accept their offer on the spot. Registration is required at trentu.ca/discover

Excalibur Varsity Volleyball
Time: 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m. (women)
8:00 p.m. – 10:00 p.m. (men)
Location: Trent Athletic Centre Gymnasium
About: Come out to cheer on the Trent Excalibur as they take on University of Windsor.

Friday, February 2 – Saturday, February 3, 2018

Populist Responses to Globalization: At Home and Abroad
Location: Sadlier House, 751 George St N,
About: The Trent University Student Association for International Development hosts the 11th annual Community Movements Conference. The two-day event will consist of presentations and workshops presented by academics, social activists, and others interested in local and international ‘populist’ backlashes or responses to globalization, and its relation to development studies. The conference aims to explore how the social and political consequences of neoliberal globalization have spurred, directly and indirectly, the generation or mobilization of various populist movements and ideologies in response. It will examine domestic and international political responses from civil societies and states.

Saturday, February 3, 2018

ToursPlus Peterborough: Arts
Time: 9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.; 12:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.
Location: Wenjack Theatre, Otonabee College
About: On a ToursPlus Arts campus tour, future students will be able to see a variety of spaces on campus including: two student residence buildings, classrooms, and college spaces. Registration is required. Students are invited to attend information sessions and mini lectures, and apply or accept their offer on the spot! Registration is required at trentu.ca/discover

Excalibur Varsity Volleyball
Time: 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m. (women)
8:00 p.m. – 10:00 p.m. (men)
Location: Trent Athletic Centre Gymnasium
About: Come out to cheer on the Trent Excalibur as they take on Western University.

Wednesday, February 7, 2018

Collaging with Texture: Materiality as Narrative
Time: 1:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.
Location: The Gathering Space, Gzowski College
About: A two-hour workshop for everyone, regardless of artistic ability. Within this workshop, swatches of varying textured coloured fabric will serve as a sensory expression of voice, emotion and experience. Each participant will have access to varied shaped fabric, each with a unique texture: silk, lace, cotton, ribbed cotton, polyester, wool, burlap, and sandpaper. Depending on the comfort level of participant, they can either share a story for the group, people of their choosing or share their stories only with themselves. As the story is told, shared or thought, participants can run their hands over the fabrics and choose textured fabric that relates to experience or emotion. As the materiality functions as narrative, participants will have an opportunity to create a work that conveys a timeline or use collage to create a visual.

Thursday, February 8, 2018

Intimate Environments: Considering the Muriel Rukeyser Archive
The Elaine Stavro Distinguished Visiting Scholar in Theory, Politics & Gender
Time: 7:30 p.m. – 9:00 p.m.
Location: Bagnani Hall, Traill College
About: Muriel Rukeyser (1913–1980) is most well-known as a poet who was loosely affiliated with Communist Party activities in her early twenties. Rukeyser travelled to West Virginia accompanied by a photographer friend to report on the deaths of hundreds of miners from silicosis, events she documented in her monumental poem, The Book of the Dead (1938). This work and her research on the history of physical chemistry, together with the archives of her lifelong loves, offer provocations for feminist theory to consider the scope of what we mean by environments and the intimacies they shelter. Dr. Rosemary Hennessy is the L.H. Favrot Professor of Humanities and professor of English at Rice University in Houston, Texas, and is a faculty affiliate with the Center for the Study of Women, Gender, and Sexuality.

Friday, February 9 – Saturday, February 10, 2018

Indigenous Women’s Symposium
Location: Gzowski College
About: The symposium is an event that brings together Indigenous women, their families and allied scholars to celebrate the voices, experiences, and lives of Indigenous women. The symposium will feature keynotes by Anishinaabe scholar Robin Wall Kimmerer and Poet Laureate Rebecca Thomas, as well as various workshops and presentations, Indigenous foods, and land-based learning opportunities over the two days. To learn more about the symposium and to register, visit the http://indigenouswomenssymposium.com/

Thursday, February 15, 2018

Mitsi (the words): North at Trent Lecture Series
Time: 7:30 p.m. – 10:00 p.m.
Location: Bagnani Hall, Traill College
About: The second lecture in the North at Trent 2018 Lecture Series turns literary with a presentation by Norma Dunning who will be reading from her debut collection Annie Muktuk and Other Stories. She will be speaking about the complexities of being an Indigenous woman writer, publishing with a non-Indigenous press. She will also share details into the creation of her work and its importance. Dunning’s book was recently rated 7 of the 99 books published in Canada in 2017. Norma Dunning is an Inuit writer, scholar and grandmother. She is a fourth-year Doctoral student at the University of Alberta, where she explores the intricacies of being a southern Inuk.

For a full calendar of Trent events.

About Trent University

One of Canada’s top universities, Trent University was founded on the ideal of interactive learning that’s personal, purposeful and transformative. Consistently recognized nationally for leadership in teaching, research and student satisfaction, Trent attracts excellent students from across the country and around the world. Here, undergraduate and graduate students connect and collaborate with faculty, staff and their peers through diverse communities that span residential colleges, classrooms, disciplines, hands-on research, co-curricular and community-based activities. Across all disciplines, Trent brings critical, integrative thinking to life every day. Today, Trent’s unique approach to personal development through supportive, collaborative community engagement is in more demand than ever. Students lead the way by co-creating experiences rooted in dialogue, diverse perspectives and collaboration. In a learning environment that builds life-long passion for inclusion, leadership and social change, Trent’s students, alumni, faculty and staff are engaged global citizens who are catalysts in developing sustainable solutions to complex issues. Trent’s Peterborough campus boasts award-winning architecture in a breathtaking natural setting on the banks of the Otonabee River, just 90 minutes from downtown Toronto, while Trent University Durham Greater Toronto Area, delivers a distinct mix of programming in the east GTA.

-30-

For more information, contact:
Kate Weersink, communications and media relations officer, Trent University, (705) 748-1011 x6180 or kateweersink@trentu.ca

NT5

Warrants issued for second-degree murder – Calgary Police

Calgary, AB, 22 January 2018

The Calgary Police Service Homicide Unit has issued warrants for second-degree murder in the death of Darby Chase SHADE.

Christian WHITEBEAR, 25, and Matthew CRANE-WATCHMAKER, 19, were previously sought as persons of interest in the homicide that occurred in the community of Rosscarrock, on Wednesday, Jan. 17, 2018. Warrants have now been issued for their arrest in relation to the murder. Detectives believe they are no longer within Calgary city limits and are seeking public assistance to locate them.

WHITEBEAR is described as Indigenous, approximately 5’11” tall and 190 pounds, with black hair and brown eyes.

CRANE-WATCHMAKER is described as Indigenous, approximately 5’10” tall and 140 pounds, with black hair and brown eyes. He also has a tattoo on the side of his neck.

Photos of WHITEBEAR and CRANE-WATCHMAKER are available on The City of Calgary Newsroom.

Anyone with information about this incident is asked to contact the police non-emergency number, 403-266-1234, or Crime Stoppers.

TALK: 1-800-222-8477

TYPE: www.calgarycrimestoppers.org

Case #18024474/3321

NT5

Meet Brigette Lacquette, the 1st Indigenous woman on Canada’s Olympic hockey team – CBC

A member of the Cote First Nation, she once played for Yorkton at the Saskatchewan First Nations Winter Games

January 23, 2017

When the announcement of the women’s Olympic hockey team roster was made in December, ripples of excitement rolled through Canada’s Indigenous community.

For the first time in Canada’s Olympic history, there is an Indigenous woman on the women’s Olympic hockey team.

“To represent Canada being the first First Nation is such an honour to me,” said Brigette Lacquette, 25.

She’ll be playing defence for the Olympic team in Pyeongchang.

Read More: http://www.cbc.ca/news/indigenous/brigette-lacquette-cote-first-nation-olympic-hockey-team-1.4499136

Muskrat Falls Inquiry: A missed opportunity for reconciliation – Policy Options

The terms of reference of the Muskrat Falls Inquiry don’t address the concerns of Labradorians about the impact of the dam on their lives.

The Muskrat Falls hydroelectric project in Labrador has been plagued by problems and has even been publicly labelled a “boondoggle” by Stan Marshall, CEO of Nalcor Energy, the provincial Crown corporation overseeing it. The most recent estimates predict that the cost of the finished dam will run to $12.7 billion, an increase of almost $5 billion from initial projections. The dam is not expected to produce electricity until 2020 — two years behind schedule. For a project that was supposed to ensure the future economic prosperity of the province, it has not lived up to expectations.

On November 20, 2017, after months of political pressure, Newfoundland and Labrador Premier Dwight Ball announced that the province was setting up a public inquiry into the Muskrat Falls project. Many, including myself, who are concerned about the effects of the project on the people of the province, but especially those in Labrador, were hopeful that this inquiry might address the critical social justice concerns surrounding this dam.

Read More: http://policyoptions.irpp.org/magazines/january-2018/muskrat-falls-inquiry-a-missed-opportunity-for-reconciliation/

Government of Canada accepting project proposals to support Canadians with disabilities

January 23, 2018         Gatineau, Quebec         Employment and Social Development Canada

The Honourable Kent Hehr, Minister of Sport and Persons with Disabilities, today announced that the Government of Canada is now accepting project proposals from organizations interested in receiving funding through the Opportunities Fund for Persons with Disabilities.

People with disabilities have much to offer employers, but they remain under-represented in the workforce. Through programs such as the Opportunities Fund, the Government of Canada provides support to help people with disabilities enter the labour market, thereby contributing to the growth of the middle class.

There are two separate calls for proposals: one at the regional level and one at the national level. Both regional and national applicants can apply for the Skills and Employment Stream. National applicants can also apply for the Working with Employers Stream.

The Skills and Employment Stream offers funding for projects that provide people with disabilities with work experience and training to develop employment-related skills.

The Working with Employers Stream provides funding for projects that raise awareness and help employers create inclusive workplaces. Possible activities include developing employer policies and procedures to accommodate prospective employees with disabilities, supplying inventories of unemployed people with disabilities to employers experiencing labour shortages, and facilitating information sessions supporting the hiring of people with disabilities.

Eligible applicants in all provinces and territories can submit proposals until Tuesday, March 6, 2018.

Quotes

“Canada is at its best and all of society benefits when everyone is included. That is why I strongly encourage community organizations to apply for funding through the Opportunities Fund for Persons with Disabilities, and employers to become fully engaged in this program. Leveraging the talents of all Canadians makes for a stronger, more inclusive Canada.”

– The Honourable Kent Hehr, Minister of Sport and Persons with Disabilities

Quick Facts

  • The Opportunities Fund for Persons with Disabilities (OF) has an annual budget of approximately $40 million.
  • Since its inception in 1997, the OF has helped approximately 110,000 people with disabilities across Canada.
  • The OF provides financial support to community organizations that assist people with a permanent physical or mental disability that restricts their ability to perform daily activities.
  • OF program participants typically have significant detachment from the labour force and are ineligible for assistance under Employment Insurance employment benefits.

Related Products

Associated Links

Contacts

Annabelle Archambault
Press Secretary
Office of the Minister of Sport and Persons with Disabilities
819-934-1122 / TTY: 1-866-702-6967
annabelle.archambault@canada.ca

Media Relations Office
Employment and Social Development Canada
819-994-5559
media@hrsdc-rhdcc.gc.ca

NT4

Investment, women’s rights expected to be key points of Trudeau speech at WEF – CP

Source: The Canadian Press
Jan 23, 2018 5:48

DAVOS, Switzerland _ Investing in Canada and women’s rights are expected to be central themes of a speech by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau on Tuesday at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland.

Trudeau, who arrived there Monday for his second appearance at the world forum as prime minister, will use the trip to try to convince the world’s richest to invest in Canada and to uphold women’s and workers’ rights.

Trudeau’s agenda in Davos includes various bilateral meetings with political leaders as well as meetings with the heads of global giants such as Alibaba, Alphabet and Coca-Cola in addition to an economic roundtable with business leaders on Wednesday.

His scheduled speech at the gathering on Tuesday is likely to focus on the benefits of gender equality and the advancement of women in the workplace and serve as a preview of the themes to be raised at the G7 leaders’ summit Canada will host in June.

Trudeau began his day by meeting with Dr. Ulrich Spiesshofer, the president and CEO of the ABB Group, a key player in the robotics, industrial automation and power grid industries.

ABB Group made an investment in Montreal last year, which Spiesshofer said is going “tremendously well” and that the partnership with Canada is “going the right direction.”

Trudeau also met with James Smith, president and CEO of Thomson Reuters Corp. Trudeau noted that they had met two years ago about the company coming to Canada and they “moved their entire operation from the United States to Toronto.”

The prime minister’s efforts to attract investment in Canada comes amid an uncertain future for the North American Free Trade Agreement, with the sixth round of negotiations to renew the trade pact currently being held in Montreal.

The future of the Trans-Pacific Partnership, meanwhile, may be less cloudy that NAFTA.

The Canadian Press has learned that the federal government is optimistic that a deal may be near that would see Canada agree to the Trans-Pacific Partnership as early as Tuesday.

A government official, who spoke on condition of anonymity, said Ottawa believes a deal can be struck, even though it would still like to see more headway on negotiations surrounding the automotive and cultural sectors.

Negotiations under way in Tokyo are the first high-level talks since leaders of the TPP countries met in November on the sidelines of the APEC summit in Danang, Vietnam, where Canada resisted signing on.

The 11 remaining TPP countries started working to salvage the deal after U.S. President Donald Trump withdrew last year.

INDEX: ECONOMY TRADE NATIONAL POLITICS

Man begins dog sled journey across Canada:’We’re going to face some adversities’ – CP

Source: The Canadian Press
Jan 23, 2018 5:35

By Kevin Bissett

THE CANADIAN PRESS

CHURCHILL, Man. _ A New Brunswick man left northern Manitoba Monday on a highly unlikely journey home _ a 3,000-kilometre trek by dog sled.

Justin Allen will spend the next two months with his 12 dogs making the journey from Churchill, Man., across Ontario and Quebec to his hometown in Saint John, N.B.

“We definitely expect to go through some tough conditions but we’re prepared for it. We know going into it that we’re going to face some adversities. It’s just all part of it,” he said Monday afternoon as he prepared to leave.

“If it was easy then lots of people would be doing it.”

Allen is opening an adventure business with his dogs in New Brunswick: Boss Dog Expeditions will offer adventures including dog sled or cart rides, dog assisted hikes and camping trips.

The route will see him travel from northern Manitoba, along the edge of Hudson Bay in Ontario, across Quebec and through New Brunswick.

It will involve a wheeled rig in places where the snow isn’t sufficient.

“These dogs are a special breed and they’ve been around for a long time and they opened up this country. For me there was no other option. We are going to travel across the country the way they used to do years ago.”

Allen said he has a travel window of eight to 10 weeks _ he hopes to be able to do it in less time, but it will depend on the weather, route conditions and the dogs.

He said the journey has been two years in the planning and involves a support team and lots of supplies to make sure he and the dogs are safe and healthy along the way.

“I love the dogs and this sport is my passion. I didn’t see it fitting for them to put them in a truck and drive them to New Brunswick, or fly them,” he said.

In some sections there will be a snowmobile towing supplies that will travel the trail ahead of him. In other places where there is access, a truck loaded with supplies will be following along.

“We’re going to be stopping in a lot of First Nations communities along the way and we’re going to be paying tribute to the First Nations people,” he said.

Until now, the longest trip he has taken with the dogs was about 380 kilometres, but he said they have gone thousands of kilometres in their training for this trek.

He said the trip will cost about $45,000, but he has been getting a lot of support from sponsors and donations.

“To get the right nutrition, the best food and best equipment for these dogs is not cheap. Everything in the north is twice as expensive,” he said.

He said his website (www.bossdogexpeditions.com) includes a map of the route and will feature live-tracking of his progress.

Allen said he plans to take his time, but the dogs usually try to set the pace.

“I’m not making them run. If anything I have to make them stop,” he said.

INDEX: HUMAN INTEREST NATIONAL ATLANTIC

CCPA: Dramatic change to regional-based forestry needed to best serve British Columbians and forest-dependent communities, says new report

January 22, 2018

VANCOUVER—BC must dramatically change how forestry is managed and governed if it hopes to reverse today’s troubling trends, says Bob Williams, who served as the province’s forest minister in the early 1970s, in a new report for the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives.

Williams says it is essential to shift decision-making away from unaccountable transnational forestry corporations to regional planning councils that are accountable to rural communities and First Nations.

Failure to reverse present trends where millions of raw logs are exported from BC, forest industry jobs continue to decline, and the industry’s share of provincial GDP shrinks is in no one’s interest, he says.

“We have an industry that for the most part is in the cheap commodity lumber business,” Williams says in the report that is part memoir and part research based on five decades involvement with the industry.

“We have pretended that we’ve developed a scientifically sound base for sustainable forestry practice. We’ve pretended we have a successful licensing and cutting program, and we’ve pretended that we get full value for our trees with a competitive system for selling timber and cutting rights. On all of these points, and more, we have failed,” Williams writes in Restoring Forestry in BC: The story of the industry’s decline and the case for regional management.

If managed regionally rather than by corporations BC’s iconic industry can benefit British Columbians and communities around the province, says Williams who has also been a senior government advisor.

In recent years, Williams toured forestry communities on the coast, Vancouver Island, the Kootenays and northern Interior with two registered professional foresters and a land planning researcher to examine the state of BC forests and speak with people who took control of local forests and forestry operations in order to protect valuable public resources for future generations and to create jobs today.

After these visits, Williams, registered professional foresters Ray Travers and Fred Parker and planner Denis O’Gorman determined that regional-based forestry with local input and management would best serve BC’s public forests and communities surrounding them.

Williams recommends that a BC Forest Charter be passed by the Legislature with an overall vision for the province, sustainability principles, standards and goals for this valuable public resource as well as establishment of an independent Forester General to work with regional foresters on local land planning processes.

The Forester General would provide data, information, monitoring and accountability to the regions.

“This would be a significant change from the status quo, which is basically off-loading management of our public forests to the private sector,” Williams believes. “We must grow our forests for value over time rather than simply for the volume of timber we can extract from them today.”

Williams points to Sweden as a country where forests are managed in the public interest for the long term. Sweden’s total forested lands are equal in area to BC’s commercial forests.

“The Swedes manage their lands in a scientific manner. We do not,” he says.

“They intensively replant and thin forests two or three times over a long rotation period and by doing this Sweden has increased the value and volume of trees growing in managed forests. We can learn from them,” he explained.

The report finds that if implemented well, a system of regional forest co-management with First Nations could:

  • maintain or enhance environmental health and sustainability.
  • provide for public involvement at the local level in planning and stewardship.
  • provide fulfilling jobs with a living wage.
  • create economic growth and improve equity and fairness throughout the province.

Read the report.

-30-

For more information, please contact Jean Kavanagh at jean@policyalternatives.caor 604-802-5729.

NT5

SSMCOC: Recognizing Local Business Excellence at the Outstanding Business Achievement Awards

January 20, 2018
Sault Ste. Marie, ON – It was a celebration of innovation, creativity, leadership and entrepreneurship, as the Sault Ste. Marie Chamber of Commerce (SSMCOC) handed out its Outstanding Business Achievement Awards on Saturday evening.

“This year, more than 200 nominations were received by the Chamber, for 21 different awards,” explains Don Mitchell, Acting President of the Sault Chamber. “Each of the nominated businesses were chosen by their customers and their fellow local businesses.”

In addition to the 21 awards that were open for nomination and recognize a diverse range of business activities, an additional 2 awards were presented to the Chamber’s volunteer of the year and to one individual recognized specifically by the Chamber’s Immediate Past President for their contributions to the community.

“Several new awards were introduced for the first time at this year’s event,” says Rory Ring, Chamber of Commerce CEO. “One of the most important attributes that any successful business can have is an ability to adapt and change and as our local business community adapts and changes, embracing new technologies and new business opportunities, we recognized that there were opportunities to acknowledge new management and operational activities, new innovations and emerging sectors. By integrating these new awards with our existing ones, we feel that this year’s roster of Chamber awards is indicative of the various sectors, qualities and attributes of our Chamber members.”

The new awards being presented for the first time this year included: the Community First Award (three different business sizes), the Downtown Business of the Year Award, the Beyond Borders Award, the Innovation Award, the Community Non-Profit Business of the Year Award, the Indigenous Business of the Year Award and the Leader in Accessibility Award.

The recipients of this year’s Outstanding Business Achievement Awards were:

Barry Nanne received the Sault Ste. Marie Chamber of Commerce Volunteer of the Year Award. Initiated in 1985, the Volunteer of the Year Award is given annually to an individual, or individuals, whose time commitment and contributions to the Chamber have been outstanding.

The Community First Awards, sponsored by Community First Credit Union – a Division of Your Neighbourhood Credit Union, highlight outstanding community service. The recipients of these awards contribute to the well-being of the community as a whole through initiatives such as sourcing products and/or services locally, retailing or utilizing local products, employment growth and supporting the community through charitable activities.

The Community First Award (up to 9 employees) was presented to CC Communications.

The Community First Award (10 – 25 employees) was presented to Dr. Floreani, O’Toole and Dool Orthodontists.

The Community First Award (26+ employees) was presented to ARAUCO.

Stone’s Office Supply was the recipient of the Downtown Business of the Year Award, sponsored by the Community Development Corporation of Sault Ste. Marie and Area. In support of the City of Sault Ste. Marie Downtown Strategy, as well as the strategic plan of the Sault Ste. Marie Chamber of Commerce, this award recognizes a business that is invested in the downtown business community and contributes to downtown Sault Ste. Marie. This award honors their commitment to running a business in the heart of our city and their role in creating a vibrant downtown.

Sault College was presented with the Diversity Award, sponsored by the Sault Ste. Marie & Area Local Immigration Partnership and Soo Mill Buildall. This award recognizes a business or organization that embraces, celebrates and applies holistic inclusion and participation of a diverse people, making the workplace a better environment in which to work, and the community a better place in which to live, work and raise a family.

Marlene Hemy of The Water Tower Inn was awarded the Customer First Award – Individual, sponsored by Smyl’s Highland Ford. This award recognizes an individual who continuously raises customer service to new standards of excellence and is a role model for others in customer service.

The Chamber presents three Business of the Year awards based on business size: To be considered, a business will have distinguished themselves by fostering growth, innovation, marketing strategy and consumer service excellence in their sectors.

The Business of the Year Award (up to 9 employees), sponsored by Sault Ste. Marie Economic Development Corporation, was presented to OC Hair, Bath and Body Inc.

The Business of the Year Award (10 – 25 employees), sponsored by the Sault Ste. Marie Innovation Centre, was presented to the Sault Ste. Marie Airport Development Corporation.

The Business of the Year Award (26+ employees), sponsored by Superior Auto Group, was presented to TULLOCH Engineering.

Kristina Koprash of KRUSH was presented with the Young Entrepreneur of the Year Award, sponsored by EAZY Express. The Young Entrepreneur of the Year Award recognizes the outstanding achievement of young entrepreneur(s) between 18 and 39 years of age. The award is given to an individual responsible for the success and growth of a Sault Ste. Marie-based company, who exemplifies the qualities of effective leadership, innovatively applies know-how, demonstrates excellent potential for growth, appreciates the importance in social, cultural, and environmental awareness and has demonstrated commitment to the wider community.

Quattro Hotel & Conference Centre was awarded the Customer First Award – Business, Non-Profit or Agency, sponsored by Great Lakes Honda. This award showcases a business or non-profit that places the customer experience at the heart of their business strategy and builds a sustainable culture of customer service within their organization.

The International Bridge Administration was the recipient of the Innovation Award, sponsored by Algoma Office Equipment. This award recognizes a business that has successfully incorporated a new idea, device or method or has utilized the application of better solutions to meet new requirements, internal needs or market needs.

Sault Ste. Marie YMCA was presented with the Leader in Accessibility Award, sponsored by Accessibility North. This award recognizes an organization that shows leadership in integrating and providing accessible and barrier-free working conditions for employees and accessibility in customer service. This business or organization values the contributions of persons with disabilities, promotes the development of an inclusive workplace culture and is compliant with the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act.

Wardlaw Heating & Cooling was awarded this year’s Safe Work, Sound Business Award, sponsored by Safe Communities Sault Ste. Marie. The Safe Work, Sound Business Award recognizes a business that uses a safe work management system, participates in workplace and/or community injury prevention programs and has outstanding injury-free frequency and injury severity performance.

Ontario Aboriginal Housing Services was the first recipient of the Indigenous Business of the Year, sponsored by Tenaris. This award recognizes a business which is operating, or being managed, with a minimum of 51% ownership by an Indigenous person or group. To be considered, the business has distinguished itself by fostering growth, innovation, marketing strategy and consumer excellence, while showing leadership and dedication to the preservation of culture, values and identity.

Paint Nite Sault Ste. Marie was presented with the Rising Star New Business Award, sponsored by KPMG. This award recognizes a business that has been in operation for no less than 1 year and no more than 3 years and has demonstrated strong potential by way of growth, innovation, and leadership.

Sault Ste. Marie YMCA was awarded the Community Non Profit Business of the Year Award, sponsored by Employment Solutions – Sault College. This award recognizes and rewards excellence and innovation among non-profit organizations resulting in significant social impact within Sault Ste. Marie and the Algoma district.

Tourism Sault Ste. Marie was recognized with the Beyond Borders Award, sponsored by The Sault Ste. Marie Airport Development Corporation: The Beyond Borders Award recognizes a business in any industry for excellence in the development of export markets for their products or services, through the implementation of a new export strategy within the last three years that has positively affected its bottom line.

Pinchin Ltd. was presented with the Employer of Year Award, sponsored by the Algoma Workforce Investment Corporation. This award recognizes an employer who has created cultures and communities, through every aspect of their business.

Darrell Boissoneau was the recipient of this year’s President’s Award. Initiated in 1982, the President’s Award recognizes someone who makes an exceptional effort, going above and beyond the call of duty in any area of business and community development. The recipient of this award is chosen by the Chamber’s Immediate Past President.

La-Na Fragomeni was presented with the Paul Dalseg Community Achievement Award. The Paul Dalseg Award recognizes a businessperson in Sault Ste. Marie who has demonstrated exemplary interest in the community, and in so doing, has made a major, outstanding and unique achievement or contribution to the life of the community.

Sherry Berlinghoff was presented with the Skipper Manzzutti Award for Business Achievement. Named after one of the Sault Ste. Marie Chamber of Commerce’s dedicated past presidents, Captain Feliciano “Skipper” Manzzutti, this award recognizes an individual who has demonstrated outstanding business achievement within the past year, or number of years. Like the award’s name-sake, the recipient of this award has set a high standard for exemplary entrepreneurial and community minded achievement.

The Sault Ste. Marie Chamber of Commerce was proud to welcome Sootoday.com as the presenting sponsor of this year’s Outstanding Business Achievement Awards. A locally grown news agency, Sootoday.com continues to demonstrate that it shares the best attributes of our many award recipients as it has grown to become a national enterprise in recent years.

In addition to this year’s individual award sponsors, the Sault Ste. Marie Chamber of Commerce would like to thank both The Machine Shop, the Northern Grand Gardens and Kevanna Fine Photography.

About the Sault Ste. Marie Chamber of Commerce

The Sault Ste. Marie Chamber of Commerce represents the interests of 700 plus business and agencies in Sault Ste. Marie and has been serving the needs of this community since 1889. The Sault Ste. Marie Chamber of Commerce will lead the way as the voice of business, advancing economic prosperity for its membership and the business community. Learn more about the SSMCOC at http://www.ssmcoc.com/

-30-

Media Contact:

Don Ferguson
Communications Officer
Sault Ste. Marie Chamber of Commerce
705-949-7152 or don@ssmcoc.com

NT5

New Democrat’s 3 day caucus in Saguenay called off by bad weather – CP

Source: The Canadian Press
Jan 23, 2018 0:35

OTTAWA _ Federal New Democrats have cancelled a three-day caucus meeting that was to be begin Tuesday in Saguenay, Que., because of poor weather descending on the region.

Several flights to the area about 200 kilometres north of Quebec City have been cancelled, leaving many NDP MPs unable to get to Saguenay in time for the meetings.

Environment Canada issued a winter storm warning for the Saguenay area Monday night, which said 25 to 40 centimetres of snow and blowing snow were expected over parts of central and eastern Quebec through Wednesday.

A spokeswoman for the NDP said the party would try to hold its caucus later this week in Ottawa.

“Unfortunately, the storm has had an impressive impact on the movement of our MPs in the rest of Canada,” said NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh.

“I am extremely disappointed that we have been forced to postpone our visit to Saguenay. I was really looking forward to coming back to the area, especially after being so well received in the fall.” he added.

INDEX: NATIONAL POLITICS

North’s only senator promises ‘extraordinary’ effort to hear from Nunavummiut – CBC

Dennis Patterson says he will visit all 25 Nunavut communities this year

January 23, 2018

Senator Dennis Patterson said he wants to make sure the concerns of the Nunavummiut are heard in Ottawa this year.

Currently, Nunavut is the only northern jurisdiction with representation in Canada’s Senate, because three northern senators resigned in the past year.

Senator Charlie Watt is in the process of resigning his Senate seat.

Watt was outspoken on issues affecting Nunavik in Northern Quebec. Last week, he was elected president of Nunavik’s Inuit advocacy group, the Makivik Corportation, and won’t serve in both roles.

The Senate seats in Yukon and the Northwest Territories have been vacant since August and September respectively.

Read More: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/north/nunavut-only-northern-senator-nunavummiut-1.4499015

NationTalk Partners & Sponsors Learn More